Things That Matter

This Latina Single Mom Dressed As A Man So Her Son Wouldn’t Feel Excluded At School

When Yevette Vazquez dropped off her son Elijah at school last week, she noticed more cars were parked than usual. It turns out it was “Donuts with Dad” day at Sue Crouch Intermediate School in Fort Worth, Texas.

momdad2 Credit: Yevette Vazquez/Facebook

Vazquez is a single mom, but that didn’t stop her from being there for her son. Instead of letting Elijah feel excluded, she drove home and quickly transformed herself from this:

mom1
Credit: Yevette Vazquez/Facebook

To this:

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Credit: Yevette Vazquez/Facebook

Vazquez posted photos of her transformation on Facebook. ” I know seeing other dads with there [sic] kids isn’t easy for mine but its [sic] life,” she wrote in her post. “[At] least I can do whatever it takes to put a smile on that face, so here it goes.”

momdad1
Credit: Yevette Vazquez/Facebook

The post has gone viral, having been shared more than 5,700 times as of this writing. Vazquez has also been bombarded with support and interview requests from around the globe, according to an update on her Facebook page.

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Credit: Yevette Vazquez/Facebook

“It’s so much more than I ever expected to happen,” Vazquez expressed on the social media platform. “Me and my little ones are grateful because it was definitely a moment we will never forget!”


READ: Watch A Tejano Explain What It Means To Be A Mexican Man In Texas

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Women Are Opening Up On How To Address Postpartum Depression During The Lockdown

Fierce

Women Are Opening Up On How To Address Postpartum Depression During The Lockdown

ABC

At some time or another everyone struggles with their mental health. These days, with the world in lockdown and so many of our human interactions limited, things can feel at best bleak and at worst a complete nightmare. This truth can be doubly true for women who are in the throes of a postpartum.

New mothers are facing a different type of difficulty when it comes to the after-effects of giving birth. Postpartum or postnatal depression affects one out of every 10 new mothers. According to the PANDAS (Pre and Post-Natal Depression Advice and Support organization, during the first week of the pandemic, there was a 75% increase in calls to its helpline, underlining the fact that new mothers need support more than ever.

We asked women for advice on how to cope with Postnatal depression and found some enlightening answers. Check them out below!

“We must be more open to being supportive instead of telling us things like “querías niños no??”. ” This is what u signed up for”. I never received the support from family and when shit finally hit the fan I was judged for my extreme actions. My attempts and self harm were seen as attention seeking.” –flor___venenosa

“This is so cultural. I am so sorry you went through this. It’s no wonder we don’t seek help, we are ridiculed for it.”- mrs_tori_rose@flor___venenosa 

“I think I had PPD when I talked to my mom about it she brushed it off and til this when she brings it up in front of others saying, “I thought she didn’t love her daughter. She kept crying and saying how hard it was. It’s not hard I really thought you didn’t want your daughter.” It is so hurtful every time she makes those comments and really makes me angry. Because it’s not that I didn’t love my baby I was having a hard time adjusting to motherhood. I need to figure out a way to tell to stop saying or making those comments because they aren’t helpful. For me it lasted for about a year. It got better as time went on. I was scared to talk to my doctor about it and was never on medication or anything.” –poncigue

“Did you know even when women finally speak up and say I THINK I HAVE POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION THAT THERES IS NO REAL HELP? You can google all you want and call all the hotlines you want but if you don’t have insurance- you are getting much help.” –90dayfrump

“I did after my daughter was born. I couldn’t figure out why I was so angry & sad when it should’ve been one of the happiest times in my life. This lasted for about a year & half for me.” –dee_mahree

“It would have been so helpful to have known this. My first year of motherhood was so challenging; I had no idea how depressed I was until I went to therapy.” –gg_luv

“I had PPD after my three pregnancies. During the third one I also had perinatal depression which is even less talked about. Like a lot of mental health issues I think it’s hard for people to understand especially when you are expected to be happy all the time because you have a bebé.” –piraguadeframbuesa

“I can believe this because I had postpartum depression with my first pregnancy for 9 months.” –mjtobeone

“Generational healing together.” –cynthiarey_jefa

“More post like this please!”- stephreyesfig

“I was just talking about this last night on how I didn’t get any help from anyone around me I still had to do everything! And I would forget to eat! To feed my new born baby I was detached and I would scream and I hit my 3yr old and still crying right now because my family still tries to throw it in my face that I was a bad mom! I said with people like you around me yes now I regret not leaving when I could I probably would of been better off for my kids and especially for my self I hardly smile now, I’m bitter, I try to make things better but I can’t take back what I did.” –ambelly11212

“I think I had both.” –claudia_renee@rrsls10 

“do you follow this page? If not, you should.. and get yourself highlighted here!” –nicleff@lescarbajalxo 

“*nuestro poder*” – florycantoacademy@fiercebymitu

“I ‘m still surprise on how I made so much profit after seeing many people complains of being scammed this is just amazing am still shocked thanks.” –investor_with_johnw22

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Showtime’s ‘Bad Hombres’ Is A Documentary Highlighting The World’s Only Binational Baseball Team

Entertainment

Showtime’s ‘Bad Hombres’ Is A Documentary Highlighting The World’s Only Binational Baseball Team

tecolotes_2_laredos / Instagram

Sports have a way of bringing people together. The experience of rooting for your team is a unifying feeling that transcends borders and culture. Showtime is exploring the importance of sports through the lens of the Tecolotes de los Dos Laredos.

“Bad Hombres” is a documentary highlighting immigration under President Trump through baseball.

Tecolotes de los Dos Laredos are the only binational professional baseball team in the world. The team splits their home games between stadiums in Laredo, Texas and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. Director Andrew Glazer wanted to highlight the immigration issue through a sports lens to offer a different layer to the narrative.

“Most of the people trying to come into the U.S. are families and children trying to escape horrible violence in Central America,” Glazer told CBS Local’s DJ Sixsmith. “That story has been told, so what I wanted to do was show people in a way that I thought would be relatable to what life is like on the border. What life is like on those two sides and how interconnected they are. The thing that struck me to be honest is that initially in Laredo, Texas was how pervasive Spanish is spoken.”

The documentary shows the struggles of the baseball team trying to make sense of the volatile U.S.-Mexico border relations.

The Tecolotes de los Dos Laredos split time playing their home games between two stadiums in the U.S. and Mexico. The Trump administration’s constant battle with Mexico and threats to close the border put the team’s season in jeopardy. A first look teaser shows team managers trying to coordinate the release of game tickets in time with the ever-changing immigration announcements from the Trump administration.

“Bad Hombres” speaks politics without directly addressing politics.

“Even though my film has an overarching political message, the players are not covertly or overtly political in any way,” Glazer told CBS Local’s DJ Sixsmith. “They are baseball players and they are living their lives and a lot of them are trying to make it to the majors and some of them were in the majors and are now finishing their careers. There wasn’t a whole lot of political discussions.”

Glazer made sure to highlight the depths and complexities of the team members dealing with the political climate without politics.

“Inherently, what made the team fascinating is you had players from the U.S. who were Anglo-American players and Mexican American players who had a different perspective,” Glazer told DJ Sixsmith. “Then you had Mexican players and some Dominican players and Cuban and people from everywhere else. There were different languages and different perspectives. Seeing how that developed over time was pretty fascinating.”

“Bad Hombres” is streaming on Showtime.

READ: Veronica Alvarez Is The Coach For The Oakland A’s And Her Presence Is Giving Girls A Chance To Pursue Baseball

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