Entertainment

This is Why René Pérez of Calle 13 Won a Nobel Peace Summit Award

So, Residente of Calle 13 just received a Nobel Peace Summit Award, which is awarded to personalities in entertainment and culture who stand up bring awareness to social issues. How did that happen you ask? Residente, a.k.a. René Pérez, has been a very loud and progressive voice for several causes throughout his time with Calle 13. He’s supported everything from LGBT rights to the eradication of human trafficking, all while making pulse-pounding music. Here are just some of the things René Pérez did to deserve the Nobel Peace Summit Award.

Dude supports LGBT rights globally and has not been shy about saying so.

Calle 13 teamed up with MTV and UNICEF to make a movie called Invisible Slaves which tackled human trafficking.

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Credit: MTV / UNICEF / Invisible Slaves / ¡Luchemos contra la trata de personas! / YouTube

The film, which was directed by Pérez, highlighted the problems and conditions many children and young girls find themselves after they forced into sex work.

READ: Rape, Murder, Kidnapping: The Reality of Teenage Girls in El Salvador

The Calle 13 frontman sat down with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to write “Multi_Viral,” a song addressing government censorship.

In Calle 13’s “Adentro” music video, René destroys his Maserati in a protest against consumerism.

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Credit: Calle13VEVO / YouTube

“When I started using the car, it made me feel uncomfortable owning it … because I realized that the car stood for everything that is wrong with society,” René told DailyMail. “Material goods aren’t what makes life worthwhile.”

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Credit: Calle13VEVO / YouTube

Residente has taken part in marches against police brutality in the U.S., standing in solidarity with his African-American peers.

René has used his fame in the Latino community to bring awareness to the 43 missing Ayotzinapa students in Mexico.

He has been fighting against the political imprisonment of Oscar López Rivera.

Hoy en la parada Boricua en NY dedicada a Julia de Burgos marchando por Oscar Lopez

A photo posted by Rene Perez Joglar (@residente) on

The Nobel Prize was also awarded, in part, to the use of his lyrics to promote social causes like…

Immigration with “Pa’l Norte”

Credit: Calle13VEVO / YouTube

?En tu sonrisa yo veo una guerrilla, una aventura, un movimiento tu lenguaje, tu acento. Yo quiero descubrir lo que ya estaba descubierto.?

Consumerism and Violence with “Adentro”

Credit: Calle13VEVO / YouTube

?Mi honestidad es color transparente, me puedes ver por dentro con solo mirarme de frente.?

Censorship with “Multi_Viral”

Credit: elvecindariocalle13 / YouTube

?Y no nos paran porque un mensaje contundente. Convierte a cualquier teniente en un tiburón sin dientes.?

Death of Filiberto Queda with “Querido FBI”

Credit: pegao / YouTube

?Ahora voy a explotar con estilo en el nombre de Filiberto Ojeda Ríos. Me tumbaron el pulmón derecho pero todavía respiro. Me voy a los tiros, pero todavía respiro.?

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These Spanish-Language Albums Changed The Face And Feel Of The Music Industry

Entertainment

These Spanish-Language Albums Changed The Face And Feel Of The Music Industry

Los de atras vienen conmigo / Sony Music Latin / Celia & Johnny / Vaya

Whenever anyone dares to write a list of the most influential albums of all time, there are generally detractors who come up in arms. We do not wish to upset anybody with this selection of amazing albums, though. We just want to show you the depth and breath of the music that has come out of Latin America and out of the Latino diaspora in the United States. It is pretty easy to listen to all of these, so fire up your Spotify, get your headphones on and just let yourself go.

Música maestro.

“Re” by Cafe Tacvba

Year released: 1994

Genre: rock mexicano

Credit: R-4391373-1363636582-9482.jpeg.jpg. Digital image. Discogs

Widely regarded as the best Mexican rock album ever released, this masterpiece has been appreciated by people like Madonna. The album borrows from genres such as danzon and Tex-Mex music and produces indelible sounds that will make you laugh, dance and cry.

“Dónde están los ladrones?” by Shakira

Year released: 1998

Genre: Rock en español

Credit: R-5843968-1439639530-5572.jpeg.jpg Discogs. Digital image.Discogs.

Before she told us that her hips don’t lie and became a world phenomenon, Shakira released this mellow album that revealed her talent as a songwriter. She was young, beautiful and intelligent, a true example of the power of Latina women.

“Siembra” by Willie Colón y Rubén Blades

Year released: 1978

Genre: Salsa

Credit: Siembra-Colón-Blades. Digital image. Revista Replicante

It is not often that true legends collaborate. The New York native Willia and Blades from Panama released this album, which includes the classic “Pedro Navajas,” a true masterpiece that is violent and joyful at once.

“Una década” by Rubén Blades

Year released: 2003

Genre: Salsa

Credit: Una-década-Blades. Digital image. Revista Replicante

This is an amazing collection with Blades’ recordings from the 1990s. What makes him special is the skillful combination of musical skill and social commentary in the poignant lyrics.

“Tijuana Sessions Vol. I” by Nortec Collective

Year released: 2001

Genre: Electronic

Credit: 64. Digital image. Lado B.

This duo from the border city of Tijuana really got what it means to live in a liminal zone that is equally influenced by Anglo and Latino cultures. The result is as enigmatic as, say, Radiohead’s “OK Computer.” A real masterpiece that will make you fly.

“Leche” by Fobia

Year released: 1993

Genre: Latin Rock

Credit: 81. Digital image. Lado B.

The intellectual offspring of the likes of Lou Reed and David Bowie. The front singer Leonardo de Lozane held an enigmatic, androgynous vibe. This album is like a shot of tequila: kitsch, yet punchy. 

“Mucho barato” by Control Machete

Year released: 1997

Genre: Hip Hop

Credit: 41. Digital image. Lado B.

The precursors of hip hop south of the Border. This album was revolutionary: as angry as Rage Against the Machine, yet using Spanglish in newfound ways that touched the vulgar and poetic.

“Chavela Live at Carnegie Hall” by Chavela Vargas

Year released: 2003

Genre: Ranchera

Credit: MI0001307534. Digital image. All Music

Chavela Vargas was a revolutionary on many fronts. She was one of the first openly queer personalities in Latin American music, and she revived her career well into her golden years. This album is a live performance in the legendary Carnegie Hall in New York: it is the stuff legends and dreams are made of.

“Adios Nonino” by Astor Pizzolla

Year released: 1969

Genre: Tango

Credit: 50-latin-albums-46.-astor-piazolla-y-su-quinteto-adios-nonino-1969-billboard-500×500 (1). Digital image. Billboard

After Carlos Gardel, Astor Piazzolla is perhaps the most representative tango musician in history. He revolutionized tango by giving the classic Argentinian and Uruguayan genre a modern twist. His accordion is damn sexy, the stuff that makes the blood and passions pump.

“Buena Vista Social Club” by Ry Cooder, Compay Segundo, Ruben Gonzalez, Eliades Ochoa and Ibrahim Ferrer

Year released: 1997

Genre: Son cubano

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-18.buena-vista-social-club-buena-vista-social-club-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard

This is the soundtrack for Wim Wenders now-legendary film that follows a group of Cuban musicians. The album smells of rum, cigars and sunset at Havana. The album is groundbreaking because it helped Western countries get acquainted with the complexity of Latin music.

“El circo” by La Maldita Vecindad

Year released: 1991

Genre: Urban rock / danzon

Credit: 18. Digital image. Lado B.

One of the great ways in which Latin American culture has pushed back against foreign cultural influence is of course music. This album tells everyday sad, courageous and unbelievable stories from Mexico City. From kids who live in the sewers to a bar where the saddest souls in the city dance, this is a true joya that mixes traditional and modern genres. “Kumbala” is one of the best songs ever written, period.

“Mundo Colombia” by Celso Piña

Year released: 2002

Genre: Cumbia

Credit: 51OKb1oU4CL._SX466_. Digital image. Amazon.

The great Celso is a musician from Monterrey, Mexico, who has nevertheless become one of the leading cumbia musicians. The genre is originally from Colombia, so in this album Celso offers an homage to the ritmos sabrosos of Colombian lands.

“Nada personal” by Soda Stereo

Year released: 1985

Genre: Rock argentino

Credit: 65. Digital image. Lado B.

We could argue that this band led by the late Gustavo Cerati was even better than Anglo groups like Duran Duran. This album is all energy and 1980s vibe. New Wave sounds that are still listed to by Latin American youth.

“Suavemente” by Elvis Crespo

Year released: 1998

Genre: Merengue

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-17.elvis-crespo-suavemente-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard

Suavemente, besame…. we are sure you have listened to this song at a wedding or at unos quince. Crespo brought Merengue to the mainstream and that is something that will never be taken away from him.

“Cielo de tambores” by Grupo Niche

Year released: 1990

Genre: Cumbia/salsa

Credit: R-5071556-1454493188-1038.jpeg. Digital image. Discog.

Perhaps the most influential Colombian album of all time. This album is energetic and sounds like the dark roast of Colombian coffee. Con sangre y con sudor su historia escribio.

“Secretos” by José José

Year released: 1983

Genre: Ballad

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-27.-jose-jose-secretos-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard.

The Mexican Frank Sinatra. This album is the epitome of his estilo llegador: songs like “El Amor Acaba” and “Lagrimas” will play in the late hours of the night while you sip a tequila and think of amores perdidos.

“En cico en la cárcel de Santa Martha” by El Tri

Year released: 1989

Genre: Rock mexicano

Credit: 19. Digital image. Lado B.

Just like Johnny Cash did in Saint Quentin and other prisons, the legendary band El Tri (think of a Mexican version of The Ramones) played for the inmates, creating one of the most lively records in the history of Latin American rock.

“Celia & Johnny” by Celia Cruz and Johnny Pacheco

Year released: 1974

Genre: Salsa

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-14.celia-cruz-celia-johnny-billboard-500×50. Digital image. Billboard

Every legend has a beginning, and this was it for Celia Cruz, the absolute queen of salsa. Azuuuuuuucar!

“Bachata Rosa” by Juan Luis Guerra y sus 4.40

Year released: 1990

Genre: Bachata

Credit: 94756091. Digital image. Toda coleccion.

This Dominican legend took pop music by storm with songs like “Burbujas de amor”. Quisiera ser un pezzzzz.

“Los de atras vienen conmigo” by Calle 13

Year released: 2008

Genre: Raeggeton

Credit: 50-spanish-language-albums-5.-calle-13-los-de-atras-vienen-conmigo-billboard-500×500. Digital image. Billboard.

Residente and Visitante poured it all in this album, which is fun to listen to, but also contains some very punchy and politically incendiary lyrics.

“La espada y la pared” by Los Tres

Year released: 1995

Genre: Rock chileno

Credit: 56. Digital image. Lado B.

This Chilean band mixes rock, jazz, and cueca, a traditional genre of the indigenous peoples of Chile. This album was one of the first to be produced after Pinochet’s dictatorship and the energy is palpable: a new era of freedom was coming.


READ: Country Music Is Losing Steam As Latin Music Experienced Major Growth In Popularity Last Year

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People Are Pleading Obama To Pardon Oscar Lopez Rivera After 35 Years In Prison

Things That Matter

People Are Pleading Obama To Pardon Oscar Lopez Rivera After 35 Years In Prison

@TupamaroMRT / Twitter / @residente / Instagram

You’ve probably heard a lot of people talking about Oscar López Rivera, but who is he? For one, he’s the longest-held political prisoner in Puerto Rico’s history. Second, he’s been in prison for more than 35 years for a nonviolent conviction, according to Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez.

Puerto Rican Oscar López Rivera has been a political prisoner for more than 35 years.


López Rivera was convicted of seditious conspiracy.

According to Cornell Law, seditious conspiracy is defined as “two or more persons” attempting to “conspire to overthrow, put down, or to destroy by force the Government of the United States.”

López Rivera is currently being held in prison in Terre Haute, Indiana.

López Rivera is accused of being a part of the Armed Forces of National Liberation (Fuerzas Armadas de Liberación Nacional or FALN).


According to Encyclopedia Britannica, FALN formed in the mid-1970s and its members were responsible for several bombings in the U.S. and Puerto Rico from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s. One such bombing led to the death of four people in New York City.

Now that President Obama’s time left in the White House is coming to an end, there is a renewed push to have López Rivera pardoned.


“Do you think that if the U.S. government had any evidence against him of any involvement that they wouldn’t have prosecuted him? Of course they would have,” Jan Susler, López’s attorney, told NBC News. “Oscar had no victims. He was never part of any bombings.”

And the campaign to have López Rivera pardoned has drawn some big Puerto Rican names like Ricky Martin…


And most recently, Calle 13’s Residente.


“Oscar López didn’t kill anyone, he was a pacifist,” Residente said in a Facebook video. “His story has been taken out of context and they’ve even called him a terrorist but that’s false. He was only fighting for Puerto Rico’s independence, he even fought in Vietnam for the U.S.”

And the call for his release from prison is coming from more countries that just the U.S. and Puerto Rico.

@CubanitoEnCuba / Twitter
CREDIT: @CubanitoEnCuba / Twitter

“Mr. President, throughout your presidential term, the people of Puerto Rico have united behind one common cause; the freedom of Oscar López Rivera,” Swedish politicians told President Obama in a letter, according to Tele Sur TV. “As your administration is winding down you and only you have the opportunity to allow Oscar López Rivera to live out the final part of his life in his homeland with his family.”

A petition on the White House website has received enough signatures needed to prompt a response.

petitions.whitehouse.gov
CREDIT: petitions.whitehouse.gov

“Due to Mr. López’s age, health condition, and desire to return home, we believe he should be pardoned for the crimes he committed. Oscar López has already spent 35 years in federal prison for nonviolent offenses,” Ricardo Rosselló, Puerto Rico’s Governor-elect, told President Obama in the letter, according to NBC News. “Although the charges against him are very serious, so are our compassion and mercy.”

Several politicians have started to pressure the president to make a decision.


“He [López Rivera] was not convicted of committing a violent crime,” Rep. Luis Gutierrez said on the House floor. “Rather, he was convicted of seditious conspiracy: espousing the belief that Puerto Rico are capable of, entitled to, and have the unalienable right to self-determination and freedom.”

Even everybody’s favorite grandpa, Bernie Sanders, has been campaigning for López Rivera’s release.

Con Senator Bernie Sanders #FreeOscarLopezRivera

Posted by Residente on Thursday, December 8, 2016


López Rivera was offered a deal by President Bill Clinton in 1999 but didn’t take it. According to The Guardian, López Rivera turned down the deal because it required an additional 10 years in prison and would leave two of his co-defendants behind.

“He refused to leave anyone behind,” Susler told The Guardian. “He is a Vietnam veteran, and still strongly believes that you do not leave your friends behind. However, since [López Rivera] is the last Puerto Rican political prisoner, those conditions no longer apply.”


READ: Monica Puig Won Puerto Rico’s First Olympic Gold Medal And People Went Nuts

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