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This Insane Video Game Out Of Mexico Will Break Your Reality

CREDIT: Broken リアリティー / YOUTUBE

A group of video game developers in Mexico are working on a game so weird that its trailer is enough to make you think you’ve just taken a hit of LSD. The trailer for “Broken Reality,” a game that was just listed on crowdfunding site Kickstarter, shows off a world that is an obvious nod to the unrefined 3D graphics found in many ’90s computer games. However, the developers ramped up the graphics to showcase a stunning game that could only be made with today’s technology.

The game’s visual style was carefully chosen to highlight the abstract world of “Broken Reality.”

CREDIT: Broken リアリティー / YOUTUBE

Rather than create a game with the polished, realistic look that most mainstream games go for, the Mexico City-based team embraced a surreal experience one might expect from playing on an old computer that’s about to crash. The backgrounds are all wrong. The graphics are glitchy. And the colors clash and bleed like a corrupt video file. All of these features are based around the game’s location.

“Broken Reality,” developers said, “is a single player first person adventure game set on a 3D reimagining of the World Wide Web.”

CREDIT: Broken リアリティー / YOUTUBE

The trailer opens with the sound of an old 56k modem connecting to the internet, immediately letting players know where and when the game draws its inspiration. For those who remember, mid to late ’90s Internet was a very experimental and confusing time. Every website had bizarre backgrounds, low-resolution graphics, and all videos were pixelated and barely watchable by today’s standards. Rather than trying to forget that era of online experience, the game’s developers borrowed heavily from it, saying, “[Broken Reality] is all about its atmosphere. Mostly inspired by internet subcultures, the game is driven by a musical and visual style reminiscent of late ’80s and early ’90s computer graphics.”

Not much is known about the gameplay at the moment.

CREDIT: Broken リアリティー / YOUTUBE

According to the Kickstarter, the game is still in its early phases and scheduled for released in late 2017. What we know is that players “will be able to surf back and forth between levels, unlocking new areas within them through the use of flavorful tools.” And “players are able to explore the interconnected world since the beginning, and may even find endings to the game early on although some endings will require more elaborate conditions to be met.” Many of the game’s goals are similar to that of being online, like making friends, giving thumbs up and collecting items.

We can’t talk about “Broken Reality” without bringing up Vaporwave.

CREDIT: NOSTALWAVE / YOUTUBE

Drawing influence from late ’90s internet culture is not a new idea. For the last several years, Vaporwave (a music/video genre) has slowly found a home on websites like YouTube and Bandcamp. Visually, Vaporwave videos tend to feature primitive computer graphics and old commercials that look like they’ve been copied off a dying VHS cassette. The music is harder to explain, but it tends to sound like smooth jazz that’s been chopped and screwed into a nice jam. “Broken Reality” might be the first video game to really embrace this kind of look on purpose, but it’s definitely not the first experiment like this to hit the internet.


READ: There Aren’t Many Iconic Latinos in Video Games, but This Guy is One of Them

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Residents Cite Negligence After Mexico City Train Collapse Leaves At Least 23 Dead

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Residents Cite Negligence After Mexico City Train Collapse Leaves At Least 23 Dead

A segment of a Mexico City Metro train line with a history of structural problems collapsed on Monday night leaving nearly two dozen dead and many more injured. As the dust begins to settle, many residents of the city are already pointing fingers at local officials who have done little to ensure the line’s safety.

Mexico’s President Andres Manuel López Obrador has said that his government will allow for a transparent investigation and will “hide nothing” from the public but many have little faith in the government to do what’s right.

Mexico City Metro train collapses and leaves 23 people dead and many more injured.

A metro train traveling on an overpass in the southeastern part of Mexico City collapsed late on Monday, killing at least 23 people and injuring more than 70. One person trapped in a car underneath the wreckage was pulled out alive.

The two train carriages were seen hanging from the structure, above a busy road. This is the deadliest incident in decades in the city’s metro system, one of the busiest in the world.

A crane was sent to the scene to stabilize the carriages amid concerns they could fall onto the road, which forced officials to temporarily halt rescue efforts at night.

In chaotic scenes, anxious friends and relatives of those believed to be on the train gathered in the area. Efraín Juárez told AFP news agency that his son was in the wreckage. “My daughter-in-law called us. She was with him and she told us the structure fell down over them.”

Gisela Rioja Castro, 43, was looking for her 42-year-old husband, who always take that train after work and had not been answering his phone. She said the authorities had no information about him. “Nobody knows anything,” she told the Associated Press.

Mexico City’s metro system is one of the world’s busiest but has long suffered from underfunding.

Mexico City’s metro system is one of the most used in the world, carrying tens of millions of passengers a week. In North America, only New York’s subway carries more people every day. Yet the incident did not occur on one of the older lines, which have been through at least two major earthquakes in the past 35 years. Rather it happened on Line 12, completed as recently as October 2012.

There will be difficult questions for the mayor’s office to come about the construction of the line, including for several former mayors.

They include Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard, who was in office when Line 12 was unveiled and who championed the metro’s expansion. He called the accident a “terrible tragedy”.

Mexico City’s current mayor has promised a thorough investigation.

The tragedy puts the spotlight on Mayor Sheinbaum and Foreign Affairs Minister Marcelo Ebrard, two key allies of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador who are both seen as early front-runners to be Mexico’s next president. Lopez Obrador said at the Tuesday briefing that his government would “hide nothing” from the public about the accident.

Sheinbaum, who has been mayor for more than two years, said the city was going to inspect the entire Line 12, on the southeast side of the city, which she said had been undergoing regular maintenance. She said the rest of the subway lines are safe, though she pointed out that as recently as January, the metro system had had another major problem, a fire in the main control room that stalled operations through mid-February.

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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