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Tourists Bring Millions Of Dollars To The Amazon Just To Try This Drug

CREDIT: Jairo Galvis Henao/FLICKR

Every year, thousands of tourists travel to the Amazon to participate in ayahuasca rituals, which are said to be life-changing spiritual experiences. Ayahuasca is a powerful drug that, when prepared correctly, allegedly has the ability to blast the most skeptical user into a hallucinogenic trance that opens their eyes to the true nature of the universe. However, the popularity of the drug is putting a drain on the Amazon region, especially in Peru, where tourist demand is creating a shortage of ayahuasca’s main ingredient, the Guardian reports.

Tourists bring fat wallets to the area, but they are putting a strain on the supply of caapi vine available to “indigenous healers.”

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CREDIT: Ryan Haran / Flickr

Every year, tourists bring in over 6 million dollars to the region, but the economic boom has created a crisis among the curanderos who rely on supplies that are becoming increasingly difficult to acquire. The caapi vine, a vital ingredient, can take several years to mature, and growers are currently having trouble meeting local needs. Adding to the demand, exporters are sending Amazonian ayahuasca materials to foreign countries, contributing to the overall depletion in the Amazonian region. The Guardian reports that many shamans have had to seek out alternative ingredients to accommodate the growing demand, but this has contributed to problems in the quality of the ayahuasca tea that tourists consume. Is there a solution to this current crisis? Check out the Guardian‘s piece to see what steps growers and shamans taking.

[READ MORE] The Guardian: Tourist boom for ayahuasca a mixed blessing for Amazon


READ: You’ve Seen These Landmarks Many Times Before, But Can you Name Where They’re From?

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My Parents Made Way Less Money Than I Do, But This Is How They Managed Their Budget To Raise 5 Kids

Finance

My Parents Made Way Less Money Than I Do, But This Is How They Managed Their Budget To Raise 5 Kids

Growing up, I had no idea that my family was poor, because we always had everything we needed and I never heard my parents argue about money.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

But long after I moved out and started making my own money, my dad gave me a reality check. I complained to him about my salary and he told me that my earnings were way more than he ever made. That got me to thinking…

How did my parents raise five kids on so little?

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Workin hard af! 💯💯💯 By @mexicancomedy

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One thing that made me feel like a complete failure at being independent was that while I made more than my parents ever did, I didn’t own a home and didn’t have a car the way they had my entire life — and I was only providing for myself, not a whole family. So how did my parents accommodate for five kids on a really small budget? Here’s how they did it, and how I’m learning to budget my own money today thanks to them:

90 percent of the things my parents bought were purchased at the swap meet and yard sales.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BOK7mwXgKu4/?taken-by=mexicancomedy


From produce to home appliances, almost everything in our house came from the swap meet, where my mom could haggle for cheaper prices.

We almost never had fast food or went out to eat.

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Mexican Moms 😒😩😂 FOLLOW @puro_jajaja

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On the rare occasion that my mom didn’t want to make food, my dad would get us hamburgers — but without cheese, because we’d add slices of cheese once we got home.

Our annual vacations were strictly road trips.


And we almost never stayed at hotels.

Half the trips we took were camping vacations.


And you can bet we took everything with us.

When we weren’t camping, we crashed with family.


There’s no way to you can go to the town your family lives in and not call them. You’d be in big trouble.

My parents only ever bought used cars.


They’ve always said the number one investment is owning a home, which they always did. However, when it came to cars, they taught me the value lessons each year. The added bonus of buying a used car: you can pass it down to a primo when you’re done with it.

The only socializing we did was at family functions.

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There’s no need to spend money at the club or a movie theater when you have a cousin’s quinceañera or tía’s birthday party every Saturday.

If anyone got sick, we never used typical medicine.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BPItuzCjRXz/?tagged=vaporub


If you had a cold, a cough, a broken limb, or even a fatal disease, it wasn’t anything a little vaporú, tequila, and a prayer couldn’t handle.

We never bought name brand items.


If we wanted Nikes or a Barbie, we’d head straight for the swap meet.

We didn’t pay for childcare. Family takes care of family.


Why pay for a babysitter when your oldest daughter can do the job for free?

If we needed a haircut, we’d make an appointment with the lady down the street.


Letting Lupe cut your hair was always a risk, but we had no choice. If the haircut was super bad, it would make for a good story later.

To some, this way of life might seem sad, but it wasn’t. I had the best childhood ever and it really made me value the stuff I did have. I didn’t take things for granted and realized the most important things in life could never be purchased.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz


READ: Here Are Some Of The Most Annoying Things That Happen To Latinos In Small Towns Can you relate to this? Let us know by sharing this story and commenting below. 

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