Culture

This Artist Gave Pokémon The Mayan Makeover You Didn’t Know They Needed

Indie artist Mona Robot (Mona Robles) is giving the Pokémon you grew up loving that Latino flair you didn’t know they were missing. But don’t worry. She isn’t giving them mariachi outfits or showing them eating tamales. She is applying some stunning Mayan aesthetics to these Japanese monsters to create art that is truly jaw-dropping.

It all started three years ago, according to Mexican artist Mona Robots, who had just started experimenting with Mayan aesthetics.

unnamed
Courtesy of Mona Robots

“It all started because the Pokémonathon was going on, it’s a creative project were artists reimagined Pokémon in their own style. By then I had started experimenting a bit with this aesthetic, so I decided to go for it,” Mona Robots told mitú. “I’m from Chiapas, where there are several Mayan ruins I’ve visited, this is a mythology and aesthetic I love and am familiar with, I think it’s really interesting and has a lot of potential to adapt to modern ideas. ”

The artist credits the Pokémonathon project to helping her create some her first proper digital artworks: like this Bulbasaur evolution.

bulbasaurs
Courtesy of Mona Robots

“I don’t intend to make Pokemayas exclusively or forever, but I’d love to set out to re-work some of my favs,” Mona Robot told mitú. “It would basically just be reworking the lines so they don’t look so dated, and perhaps include a few new ones I never got around to make.”

Not to mention her sick rendition of the Charmander evolution.

charmander
Courtesy of Mona Robots

“I decided it would be neato to apply elements of the Maya aesthetic and cosmovision to Pokémon because there are so many creative works out there inspired in oriental mythologies, but you don’t see the same phenomenon happening with other cultures,” the artist told mitú.

The artist says she wasn’t a huge fan of the game when she was younger, but she knew enough to reimagine fan favorites like Squirtle.

squirtle-evo
Courtesy of Mona Robots

“Pokémon was a huge phenomenon while I was growing up,” Mona Robots recalled to mitú. “Everything Pokémon was popular and exciting and new.”

Of course she included the three legendary birds: Articuno [Ice]…

articuno
Courtesy of Mona Robots

…Zapdos [Electric]…

zapdos
Courtesy of Mona Robots

…and Moltres [Fire].

moltres
Courtesy of Mona Robots

“I love the concept of creatures with powers and skills based off the elements, and the idea that they evolve,” Mona Robots told mitú. “They are important because they’ve always been there, and it’s something familiar me and a ton of other people can connect with, even if we are not exactly the same age, that’s pretty dang cool.”

She has even given all the Eevee fans something to celebrate.

eeveeevo
Courtesy of Mona Robots

#Hallelujah

And yes, she even drew her favorite Pokémon, Nidoking.

nidoking
Courtesy of Mona Robots

If you want to support the artist, you can click here for her Patreon page.

H/T: Remezcla

READ: This Guy’s Pokemon Go Corrido Is Funny And Actually Pretty Sweet

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Hundreds Of Mexicans Being Treated For HIV Were Being Given Obsolete Medications From The 1980s

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Hundreds Of Mexicans Being Treated For HIV Were Being Given Obsolete Medications From The 1980s

Gobierno de Mexico

For a long time, it was considered that Mexico had averted the worst of the HIV/AIDS crisis that has plagued much of the Americas. For a country of its size and population, Mexico historically has had a very low incidence rate of HIV infection – even among populations considered at a high-risk.

Mexico is also a nation that has a robust public healthcare system that provides medical care to its citizens free-of-charge or at very low prices, including HIV medications.

Many looked to Mexico as a role model for developing countries confronting the worldwide HIV epidemic. However, after recent reports about obsolete medications being given to HIV and AIDS patients many are beginning to question that way of thinking.

Mexico’s Health ministry revealed that Mexico had been buying outdated medications from suppliers that no longer worked.

Credit: Gobierno de Mexico

Hugo López-Gatell, Undersecretary of the Ministry of Health, revealed this morning that some drug providers were selling outdated and obsolete HIV drugs to the federal government. Many of the drug being used by the government to treat HIV-positive patients were from the 1980s and have been proven ineffective around the world.

At a press conference, he explained that in late 2019, authorities realized that drug companies were intentionally manipulating the public bidding process in a scheme to sell outdated drugs to the public health ministry.

“The combination of medicines tells us about the enormous lack of proper HIV treatment because they [the HIV medications] are not adequate. In many cases we found the use of old medicines, we found the use of the first HIV drug that was invented or discovered at the beginning of the 80s. It is a drug that is already obsolete worldwide and in Mexico was still being used,” he said.

According to the government, however, it was the fault of the drug companies that were gaming a public health system.

Credit: Gobierno de Mexico

“What did we find?” That here were pressures from representatives of the pharmaceutical industry. We discovered that it was one group who made the medicines and that there were very few who distributed them. But they tie up the government with exclusive agreements to the different companies that manufacture the medicines,” he explained.

So basically, the distributors put pressure on doctors who specifically prescribed retroviral medications. He also clarified that purchases have always been made at the national level, however, they made no sense with the amounts of what they asked for in each state.

Despite this troubling revelation, the Ministry of Health has restated its commitment to securing the best care for those in need of HIV treatment.

Credit: Gilead Sciences

The undersecretary added: “In May, we completely modified the HIV treatment scheme. First, we made it clear that we wanted the best medications, the most effective, the safest; second, we identified how many people could have this ideal medication scheme and it turns out that there were many more than those who were taking advantage of it.”

This latest news comes just months after the country reformed its HIV treatment regime, leaving many fearful of shortages.

Public health officials warned of the possibility that thousands of Mexicans who rely on HIV treatment could be left without life-saving services after the government changed the way it funds treatment.

Reforms announced last month to centralize drug procurement risk sparking shortages, they say, while the government counters that it has ample supplies and hopes its changes will save money and cut corruption in the drug buying process. It’s these reforms they say that will help combat problems such as being sold outdated and obsolete drugs.

However, many HIV activists warn of a public health crisis.

In February, the government also said that it would no longer fund civil society organizations, leaving more than 200 groups fighting the disease without resources for core activities, such as HIV testing.

Mexico Pushes Back Against Migrant Caravan: Children Are Missing And Families Separated

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Mexico Pushes Back Against Migrant Caravan: Children Are Missing And Families Separated

Jose Torres / Getty

Last week news broke that another migrant caravan was forming in Honduras, in an attempt to safely cross Guatemala and Mexico on the way to the United States. Immediately, the reports were met with a mix of panic and indignity among Central American leaders who vowed to stop the caravan before reaching the US-Mexican border.

And it looks like that plan has been put into motion. Although Guatemala allowed many migrants through its territory, upon reaching the border with Mexico, many migrants were turned away, or worse.

A caravan of nearly 3,000 people has been met with force as they’ve tried to cross into Mexico from Guatemala.

Credit: Jose Torres / Getty

According to Guatemala, at least 4,000 people entered from Honduras since Wednesday, making for one of the biggest surges since three Central American governments signed agreements with the Trump administration giving them more of the responsibility for dealing with migrants. Even though these exact same countries are ill-equipped to handle the influx of migrants – let alone fight back against their country’s own poverty, violence, and corruption that force many migrants to flee in the first place.

Mexican government officials ordered them to block entry into the country. 

Mexico’s National Immigration Institute issued a statement saying it would detain any migrants without legal status, and deport them if they couldn’t legalize their status. 

Video footage showed scattered groups of migrants throwing rocks at a few members of the National Guard militarized police who were on the banks of the river attempting to thwart illegal crossings, while hundreds of others ran past into Mexico.

Hopes were raised on Friday after Mexican President AMLO announced that there were 4,000 jobs along the southern border available to migrants.

The day after AMLO’s statement regarding possible job opportunities, more than 1,000 migrants attempted to cross into Mexico. According to the country’s National Institute of Migration (INM), each migrant was interviewed and told about opportunities with two government development programs. which will be implemented along the southern border and in both El Salvador and Honduras.

Meanwhile, as migrants waited to be processed for entry into Mexico, a loudspeakers warned migrants against applying for asylum in the US. However, many migrants are doubtful when it comes to Mexico’s offer of work.

“I don’t believe that. It is a lie,” one migrant told Al Jazeera. “They are just trying to find a means trap us and to debilitate the caravan.”

The violence at the Mexico-Guatemala border has left children separated from their families as crowds were sent fleeing from pepper spray.

Credit: Jeff Abbott / Flickr

As Mexican security forces launched tear gas and pepper spray into a crowd of migrants attempting to enter the country – hundreds were forced to flee. The ensuing chaos left children lost without their parents and mothers and fathers desperately searching for their children.

A Reuters witness spoke to at least two mothers said their children went missing amid the chaos, as the migrants on Mexican soil scattered in an attempt to avoid being detained by Mexican officials.

“We didn’t come to stay here. We just want to cross to the other side,” said Ingrid, 18, a Honduran migrant. “I don’t want to go back to my country because there is nothing there, just hunger.”

Many have harsh words for Mexico’s President AMLO – calling him a puppet and a coward.

Although most agree that every country has the right to enforce its own immigration laws, many are upset with AMLO for the way his administration has cracked down on Central American migrants. Many see the crackdown as little more than bowing to pressure from Trump – turning him into a puppet of the US.

So what should AMLO do when dealing with unauthorized migrants and pressure from a US President?

First, violence and attacks on migrants simply crossing territory should never be on the table. Second, AMLO’s administration should let the caravan reach the US-border and let the asylum process play out as it was meant to do under international law. Just because Trump wants AMLO to join him in breaking international norms, doesn’t mean he should.

But many doubt that will ever happen. Neither of these presidents, Trump nor AMLO, will change course to support legal asylum claims.

So what’s next? Will Mexico relent and agree to pay for Trump’s border wall? Don’t dismiss the idea, not when the Mexican president has so far carried out Trump’s every whim.