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These Two Latino Dance Sensations Are Everything You Wish You And Your Siblings Were

The Morales family of Fresno, Calif., must be super proud, because siblings Gavin and McKenzie Morales are two adorable dance sensations. They ROCK so much that their wicked dancing has been featured on some of your favorite television shows.

Gavin Morales, 11, had only been dancing for four years when he first appeared on “The Ellen Show.”

TwirlGavin
Credit: TheEllenShow / EllenTube / YouTube

Me after watching Gavin spin: ?

And he did NOT hold back when it came to showing off his skills.

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Credit: TheEllenShow / EllenTube / YouTube

McKenzie, 13, has a little more dance experience under her belt, and she is slaying in her own right.

TwirlMcKenzie
Credit: TheEllenShow / EllenTube / YouTube

Let’s take a moment to appreciate this teen’s super strong toes.

GetUpSkills
Credit: TheEllenShow / EllenTube / YouTube

Umm…

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Credit: Steve Harvey TV / NBC Universal / Giphy

Here’s how much Gavin and McKenzie Morales are SLAYING the dance game right now:

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Credit: Gavin Morales / Facebook

McKenzie and Gavin have won numerous dance awards, including some top national honors, and have now been featured on two different Ellen Degeneres shows.

McKenzie first started dancing at 7 years old because her parents thought it would help her overcome her “severe anxiety.”

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Credit: McKenzie Morales / Facebook

“I suffer from severe anxiety and most of the time I just want to stay in my room and don’t want to face the world,” McKenzie told judges of EllenTube’s first original series “‘tWitch & Allison’s Dance Challenge.” McKenzie added, “Dance and my parents help me get through those tough times.”

Gavin started dancing when he was 6 years old. His biggest inspiration? Watching his sister practice.

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Credit: Gavin Morales / Facebook

“I started dancing because I was watching my sister dance and I was like, ‘That’s so easy. I could do that,'” Gavin told Ellen Degeneres. “And then I was in the lobby of the dance studio, and I just started teaching myself all these moves. Now I am at a dance studio training, and now I’m on The Ellen Show!”

Oh, they have even been on Lifetime’s popular reality TV show “Dance Moms.”

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Credit: Gavin Morales / Facebook

And you can find plenty of drama on momma Morales’ Twitter page.

Keep it up, you two. Your future is looking suuuper bright.

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Credit: TODAY / NBC / austex_mike / Reddit

Watch Gavin’s full “The Ellen Show” performance here.

Credit: TheEllenShow / EllenTube / YouTube

Watch McKenzie’s full “‘tWitch and Allison Dance Challenge” audition here.

Credit: TheEllenShow / EllenTube / YouTube

READ: Beyoncé, Imma Let You Finish, But… This Afro-Latina Gymnast Had The Best Dance Of The Week

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Latinas Talk About Their Fave Dance Craze

Culture

Latinas Talk About Their Fave Dance Craze

Lawrence Manning

There’s no denying the fact that dance has a pretty firm place in the hearts of just about every Latin American culture. Across our countries and cultures, and thanks to native and Afro roots, Latin Americans know how to toe step and grind better than the rest of them. From salsa and bachata to danzón and merengue dance has permeated our lives making parties, ceremonies, and even sad occasions some of the most memorable and colorful.

As we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, we turned to Latinas to ask about their favorite dances from their cultures and how it has made their life better.

We posed the question “Latin America consists of many different cultural dances. What can you say about the ones from your país? We will be featuring your answers on one of our editorial pieces.⁠”

Check out the answers below!

“CUMBIA! And Joe Arroyo so beautiful said, ‘del Indio tiene la fuerza, y el Negro la fortaleza, que le imprime el movimiento.’”- lauraarendonn


“Ritmos africanos combinados con tambores pre-colombinos y la flambuya y elegancia de los gitanos y corte española. Mi herencia cultural es un sabroso pozole.”- mercedesmelugutierrez

“Chamamé, vanera… – Southern Brazil. Super important to the gaucho culture that southern Brazil shares with argentina and uruguay.”- its.lilas.world

“El baile de los viejitos, Michoacán, México.”- angelyly_



“Punta!! Like ‘Sopa de Caracol.’”- laura_gamez27

“Samba — originated in Brazil from men and women ( mostly from West African region) that were enslaved by Portugal — and brought to Brazil.”- la_licorne_en_velours_

“BOMBA!!! A style of dance in Puerto Rico heavily influenced by our African roots.”-xosamanthaotero


“Festejo… “- jesthefania

“Danza.”- karifornialove

“Cueca from Chile.”- calisunchine



“Huapango Arribeño- San Luis Potosí, Mexico.”-hijxsdetonatiuh



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A Petition Is Going Around Highlighting Racism in The Ballet World

Entertainment

A Petition Is Going Around Highlighting Racism in The Ballet World

@BriianaBell / Twitter

Like so many corners of the globe, the Ballet world has long poured over and favored the concept of whiteness.

The “ballet blanc” is a perfect example of that. Ballet blanc or “white ballet” is a scene in a ballet performance where the performers all wear white dresses or tutus. Deeply tied to its performance is a school of thought that suggests there shouldn’t be any black dancers in the corps de ballet because the identical nature of the performers is key to the performance.

If you ever took a ballet class yourself, you also know that racism exists in ballet thanks to your first-hand experiences with the tights and shoes you bought for your classes. Most likely you noticed that the “nude” color tights and slippers you were required to wear only came in colors called “European pink.” The issue has brought about a long and laborious process Black ballerinas are subjected to endure called “pancaking.” To make the pink and peach-colored ballet shoes match their skin tones, Black dancers beat their shoes with makeup so that they match their skin tones.

In light of the current fight against ongoing racial injustices, thousands are signing petitions calling on ballet shoes makers to add darker color options to their line of shoes.

To promote the petitions, Briana Bell, a Twitter user and an 18-year-old black dancer from Dallas, explained that ballet shoes are just one of several ways that dancers of color are made to feel as if they do not belong in the world of ballet. “Black ballerinas have constantly been pushed out of the typically and traditionally white ballet world because our bodies aren’t like theirs and this is just another way to make us feel unwanted!” went onto explain in a series of tweets

In an interview with Daily Mail.com Bell explained that “Racial discrimination within the dance world is passive in my experience, but very much still there. Little things like not being able to find your skin tone in leotards, tights, and shoes may seem insignificant, but imagine how embarrassing it is to have to wear tights/leotards/shoes that do not blend with your skin and your white counterpart’s dance attire matches them perfectly. Recently, of course, efforts have been made in the way of leotards and tights but pointe shoes have fallen behind.”

Bell also highlighted the lack of support and awareness of non-POC dancers is what has continued such microaggressions.

“I’ve come to learn from the comments of my post that simple things like this never crossed the minds of many non-POC, because this seems very basic and not like a luxury to them,” she went onto explain in her interview. “But to us it’s a luxury that hasn’t been afforded yet. And while I do understand that there are some businesses that sell various shades of brown pointe shoes online, finding a pointe shoe for you isn’t so easy that you can do it online. We need to go into the shop, get our feet measured, and find the exact shoe for you because there are so many different shapes. If done incorrectly, you can injure yourself.”

Here’s hoping Belle’s petition sparks a change amongst big ballet brands like Capezio and Block.

“These big brands like Capezio and Bloch are more accessible for us because they have shops locally we can walk into,” Belle underlined. “So at this point, it’s either you sacrifice comfort and safety for the color, or you suck it up and paint your shoes after you get them.”

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