entertainment

Laurie Hernandez And Camila Cabello Made It To One Of The Most Prestigious Lists

Instagram/@LaurieHernandez_ , @Camila_Cabello

Time magazine released its annual “30 Most Influential Teens” list and two very empowering and very awesome Latinas nabbed a spot this year.

Olympic champ, Laurie Hernandez, came in at no. 7 on the list.

Laurie Hernandez
credit: “Dancing with the Stars” / ABC via giphy

“They say, ‘You made Latinas proud! And that hits me hard,’” she said to Time. “It helps me realize that I’ve done something bigger than just gymnastics.”

At only 16 years old, this charismatic gymnast of Puerto Rican descent cartwheeled her way into our hearts after slaying at the 2016 Olympics in Rio. She’s a gold and silver medalist already. If that’s impressive enough, Laurie, who ranked #7 on the list, signed an endorsement deal with Crest and is sweeping the dance floor as a contestant on “Dancing with the Stars.”

Also on the list taking at 25th spot, Fifth Harmony member, Camila Cabello.

Camila Cabello
credit: giphy.com

The youngest Fifth Harmony member is killing the charts as part of the girl group, but Cabello is also achieving great things on her own. Not only is she venturing out as a solo artist having released hits such as “I Know What You Did Last Summer” with Shawn Mendes, and “Bad Things” with Machine Gun Kelly, but this 19-year-old Cuban native is also an activist.

In a heartfelt article titled: “Our dreams were bigger than our fears” published on PopSugar, Cabello opened up about her family leaving Cuba in the mid-2000s in search of better opportunities. And she also got super candid about her views on Trump’s infamous proposed wall. “When anybody wants to tell you they want to build a ‘wall’ on our border, remember behind that wall is struggle, determination, hunger. Behind that wall could be the next cure for cancer,” she wrote.

Find out which other amazing teens made Time’s 2016 list, here

READ: Camila Cabello’s Immigrant Parents Always Told Her To ‘Ponte Las Pilas’

What other influential Latino teen would you like to see on this list? Let us know in the comments below and don’t forget to share this post!

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This Children's Cooking Show Wants To Know Why Their Grant Was Rejected

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This Children’s Cooking Show Wants To Know Why Their Grant Was Rejected

Sup Kids Cooking and Culture Show / Facebook

Meet Sara and Sammy, the little stars of “Sup! Kids Cooking.”

Sup! Kids Cooking and Culture Show / YouTube
CREDIT: Sup! Kids Cooking and Culture Show / YouTube

“On ‘Sup!’ dinner is the catalyst for exploring a whole universe,” the show’s co-producer Beth Baunoch told mitú. “The show’s primary aims are to foster cross-cultural understanding and empower young people. ‘Sup!’ uses cooking to educate, empower and inspire global citizens.”

Not only are they trying to show kids the fun and healthy side of cooking…

Sup Kids Cooking and Culture Show / Facebook
CREDIT: Sup Kids Cooking and Culture Show / Facebook

…the show is also encouraging children to learn about different cultures.

Sup! Kids Cooking and Culture Show / YouTube
CREDIT: Sup! Kids Cooking and Culture Show / YouTube

Sara and Sammy have even traveled to cook food from places they visit.

Enter the National Endowment for the Humanities.

National Endowment for the Humanities / Facebook
CREDIT: National Endowment for the Humanities / Facebook

Bausch told mitú that they applied for a NEH Development Grant to further fund the project and make eight additional episodes. They consulted with humanities advisers and filled out the application with the backing of different local organizations and made sure they followed the NEH’s guidelines.

“The NEH grant requirements focus on the humanities, and our show uses food as a way to explore the humanities. So yes, kids are learning to cook, but the idea is that they learn about the world through cooking [like] music, theatre, art, dance, philosophy, religion, film and language,” Baunoch told mitú. “Each of these themes are explored organically as the hosts contextualize what they are cooking.  We also feel strongly that middle school kids, our target demographic, are not getting this type of information on television.”

After sending an application for funding, this is the response that Sup! received from NEH.

supcooking-700x467

According to Baunoch, everyone involved with the show was surprised and saddened by the response from NEH.

“We were frustrated that the powers that be see brown skin and the first thing they do is pigeon hole them and assume they won’t have a large audience appeal,” Baunoch told mitú. “We don’t believe most people think like this. However, the people in power do which affects everyone because they decide what we see on TV. We understood that we don’t have a lot of experience as producers, and that our show is produced right now with no budget. But we have a great show that is backed by organizations that can help raise the production value of if we have money.”

“Fulfilling NEH’s mission, our show will be aided by humanities scholars in anthropology, art, music, language, history and communication,” Baunoch told mitú.

Sup! Kids Cooking and Culture Show / YouTube
CREDIT: Sup! Kids Cooking and Culture Show / YouTube

Keep your heads up, Sara and Sammy.

Sup Kids Cooking and Culture Show / Facebook
CREDIT: Sup Kids Cooking and Culture Show / Facebook

There are more people that support you than don’t.


Editor’s Note: The National Endowment of the Humanities has not responded to a request for comment, though they did tell Latino Rebels that they would never turn down a project based on someone’s ethnicity, but that they couldn’t disclose more information because their selection process was confidential.


READ: Here’s The Amazing Way This Mexican Doctor Is Helping Children Fight Cancer

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