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Here’s How These Huaraches Are Helping Guatemala’s Mayans Fight Pollution

Lake Atitlan in Guatemala was once known throughout the world for its pristine waters. Fishermen made a living from the lake, and tourists funneled much-needed money into the nearby communities. But all that has changed.

Over the last several years, Lake Atitlan has slowly become polluted by sewage, agricultural waste, and toxic bacteria.

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CREDIT: jessicafaye__ / InstagramDavid Mercer / YouTube

The once-clear waters of Lake Atitlan are now filled with contaminants like E.coli and a toxic blue-green algae called cyanobacteria, which can affect the kidneys, liver, and central nervous system. These pose serious problems for the indigenous population that depend on the lake for food, water, and their livelihood. To make matters worse, the only water treatment plant for the lake was destroyed in 2005 by Hurricane Stan and the local government has not made it a priority to help the indigenous Mayan population living off the lake.

Enter Francesca Kennedy, whose family is originally from Guatemala.

CREDIT: francesca.m.kennedy / INSTAGRAM

As a child, Kennedy spent summers visiting Panajachel, Guatemala. She was baptized in Lake Atitlan. However, in 2010, when she was visiting her grandfather, Kennedy noticed the poor condition of the lake, and worse, she saw children collecting the water to drink. When locals told Kennedy how the quality of the lake had adversely affected the economy, she decided to use her entrepreneurial know-how to help the community.

Kennedy created I.X. Style and began selling handmade huaraches, bags, and jewelry through several well-known retail establishments.

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CREDIT: IX STYLE / INSTAGRAM

The company, which was named after the Mayan word for “water,” employs about 800 female Mayan artisans from Guatemala. It donates 15 percent of its sales to organizations devoted to improving the quality of the lake’s water and the lives of those who depend on it.

The company, which started with very little money, now sees sales in excess of $500K.

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CREDIT: I.X. STYLE / INSTAGRAM

Kennedy told Forbes in a recent interview, “If you are creating a business for the right reasons, with purpose and passion, your customers will feel your authenticity.”

Read the entire Forbes interview below.

[H/T] FORBES: How This Latina Turned Her Aha Moment Into A Profitable, Socially Responsible Business


READ: Here’s What Happens When Industry Displaced Peru’s Indigenous People

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Apple Named The Top App Of 2020 And It Was Developed By Two Guatemalans

Things That Matter

Apple Named The Top App Of 2020 And It Was Developed By Two Guatemalans

pddro / Instagram

The winner of this year’s iPhone App of the Year by Apple went to Wakeout. The app is a workout app created by two Guatemalan developers and has grown in popularity since it was first released.

Pedro Wunderlich and Andrés Canella are the minds behind Apple’s top app of 2020.

Every year, Apple picks an app to be celebrated as the best app of the year. This year, Wakeout, the brainchild of two men in Guatemala, took home the coveted prize. It is a fun app, especially in the time of Covid and self-isolation.

The app is designed to motivate people to wake up and move to start their day on an active note. This lowers the user’s stress level throughout the day giving them a more successful day.

Apple focused on the apps that helped the world connect and stay healthy this year.

This years was a wild ride for everyone around the world. We had to find new ways to stay active, stay connected, and stay happy while the world stood still. Wakeout was the top app to make sure that people stayed active and motivated during these days.

The two men behind the app were clearly very excited to be the best of the year. The two of them sent tweets back and forth congratulating each other in surprise over the honor.

Tbh, seeing the two shower each other with love and praise is so sweet to see.

It is nice to see the two celebrate each other and give each other so much recognition. It was a team effort and these two are unapologetically showing the world what it looks like to be true team players.

Wakeout has become a valuable part of thousands of people’s mornings. The app gets people moving in ways that can be done anywhere. It is so important to have tools like this when your world is on pause. Being physically active is important for so many reasons.

We can’t wait to see what the duo comes up with next.

Clearly, if they are able to make something so successful during this wild imagine what they can do in normal times.

READ: Many Native Languages Are Dying Off But Here’s How Indigenous Millennials Are Using Tech To Save Them

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Here Are Some Christmas Traditions From Around Latin America

Culture

Here Are Some Christmas Traditions From Around Latin America

Henry Sadura / Getty Images

Christmas is a special time of year. Families have their traditions to mark the festive year and some of those traditions are rooted in culture. Here are some of the ways various countries in Latin America celebrate Christmas.

El Pase Del Niño Viajero – Ecuador

El Pase del Niño Viajero is a pageant that happens in Ecuador that lasts weeks. The parade is meant to represent the journey of Mary and Joseph. The parade highlights the religious importance of Christmas in Ecuador and is most common in the Andean region of the country.

The biggest and most important parade is in Cuenca, a deeply religious city. Citizens near the city have all day to see the parade as it starts in the early morning and runs through the late afternoon. This gives people a lot of time to make it to the city to witness the parade.

La Gritería – Nicaragua

La Gritería comes after La Purisma. La Purisma is celebrated at the end of November and is meant to celebrate the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary. La Gritería is celebrated in early December and involves literal yelling. Someone would shout “Que causa tanta alegria?” (“What causes so much happiness?”) People respond “La Concepción de María.” (“Mary’s Conception.”)

Las Posadas – Mexico

Mexican posadas are the most recognizable. Posadas take place in Mexico from Dec. 16-24, though this year they are most likely to be virtual. The posada begins with a procession in the neighborhood filled with people singing and sometimes led by two people dressed as Mary and Joseph.

Another part is the posada party. Before guests can enter, there is a song exchange with the people outside playing Joseph looking for shelter. The hosts sing the side of the innkeeper saying there is no room. Eventually, the guests are welcomed into the home to celebrate Christmas.

Aguinaldos – Colombia

Aguinaldos are a series of games played by people in Colombia leading up to Christmas. There are certain games that are common among people in Colombia. One is pajita en boca, which requires holding a straw in your mouth the entire time of a social event. Another is dar y no recibir, which is about getting people to take something you are giving to score a point.

El Quema Del Diablo – Guatemala

El quema del diablo is celebrated in early December and is a way of letting go of the previous year. People burn piñatas and effigies of the devil to let go of all negative feelings and moments from the previous year. If there was every to try a new tradition, this would be the year. Burn an effigy and banish 2020 to the past, where it belongs.

READ: These Seriously Sad Christmas Presents Were Worse Than Actual Coal

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