Culture

These Are Not Your Typical Wrestlers, They’re Way Better

Don’t let the colorful poofy skirts, braided hair and stocky physique fool you. These cholitas luchadoras can kick your a$$. For a good buck, they actually wrestle each other while their town watches.

Cholita, the diminutive of chola, is the name given to the local indigenous women of El Alto, Bolivia, and some of them have become celebrities thanks to the sport. Juan Mamani, a local luchador, taught them how to wrestle after people had lost interest in watching his fights.

“At the beginning, they thought of it as a bit of a joke,” said photographer Eduardo Leal. But that soon changed. “They are hugely popular, compared to the men,” he said.

When the cholitas hold a fight on Sundays, there are many tourists watching, but mostly locals. “I could see the local crowd was nearly all their friends,” Leal said.

Their popularity has come with a price, though. Some of them have lost their husbands or boyfriends because the men can’t stand to see the women show off their strength. You know, typical machista attitude.

The women dropped Mamani as their boss because he was keeping most of the money, according to Leal, but the cholitas have kept on fightin’.

Check out more pictures of these fierce women at Refinery29


READ: Would You Be Willing to Wrestle in an Old Garage for the Chance of Winning $12?

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Bolivia’s President Wants To Be Reelected For A Fourth Time But He Could Send His Country Into A Political Crisis

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Bolivia’s President Wants To Be Reelected For A Fourth Time But He Could Send His Country Into A Political Crisis

evomoralesayma / Instagram

Bolivia’s president Evo Morales is again envuelto en controversia after his attempts to be reelected once again.Juan Evo Morales Ayma is one of the most disputed figures in recent Latin American history. The indigenous activist and politician became president after leading his party, Movement for Socialism, to victory in the polls. He first attempted to win the presidency in 2002 and came in second after a very tight race. He is part of the wave of socialist and populist politics that defined South American politics in the mid 2000s, and which also included statesmen such as Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and Ecuador’s Rafael Correa (for an alternative reading of the socialist revolution in South America, watch Oliver Stone’s controversial documentary South of the Border). 

His allies see him as a true liberator of the continent, a noble opponent of the neoliberal policies that have produced millions of poor in the region. His opponents think of him as a dictator with a thirst for power. Truth is, he has subverted Bolivian politics by adopting a socialist agenda and often pushing back corporations and foreign influence, particularly from the United States. 

Morales has served as President of Bolivia since 2006: 13 years and counting.

Credit: Instagram. @fmpinilla

So how is it even possible for someone to remain in power for so long? Morales was first elected for the 2006-2009 period. In 2008 he organized a recall referendum (meaning that the electorate could decide whether to keep him or dump him), which he won. Shortly after he established a new constitution through which Bolivia became a plurinational state, meaning that indigenous nations within the borders were recognized. This reshaping of the political backbone of Bolivia led to his reelection in 2009 and then for a third term in 2014. So yes, 13 years and counting! 

So the opposition is obviously very unhappy about the prospects of a fourth Morales term, especially after a referendum that he lost.

Credit: Instagram. @fmpinilla

Morales organized a referendum asking Bolivians whether he should run again or not. A constitutional reform needed to be in place for him to do so.  He lost, but he is nevertheless on the ticket and seems to be headed to a victory in the October elections. The opposition sees this as an attempt to undermine democracy. They see Morales as a king who will do anything to keep his throne and crown. As BBC reported back on July 3, 2019: “Although the 2016 referendum results rejected the constitutional reform needed to allow Morales to seek office again, subsequent court rulings determined that not allowing him to run would violate his political rights, and electoral authorities accepted his new re-election bid”. 

Political pundits have taken their gloves off.

Credit: Twitter. @CarlosAMontaner

Personalities such as writer and journalist Carlos A. Montaner have criticized not only Morales, but also the Organization of American States (OEA), which has supported the Bolivian President in his bid for a fourth term. The OEA had previously been critical of regimes in Cuba and Venezuela. 

Protests during Morales’ mandate have been constant and increasingly violent.

Credit: Instagram. @apnews

Before becoming president, Evo Morales was famous for his combative activism. He was the leader of cocaleros or coca producers, and played an active role in the 1999 Cochabamba Water War, in which indigenous populations fought against the privatization of water. During his presidency he has encountered the same kind of combativeness, but he is now on the other side. This photo, for example, was taken at a protest against budget cuts in services for people with disabilities. His bid for a third reelection could escalate into a full-blown political crisis. 

Western powers don’t see him con muy buenos ojos, as he is an advocate of leftist politics and aligns with Putin’s Russia.

Credit: Instagram. @infonodal

Evo Morales is perceived in Western countries, including the United States, as a populist who manipulates his people into following him, and as a threat to global markets. He has aligned himself with the remains of the Soviet Bloc, meaning he has tight connections in Moscow and Havana. Just this year, Morales expressed his interest in buying Russian military equipment, as reported by Sputnik News Service: “There is a great interest in purchasing Russian military equipment, including aviation equipment, and in services. A [joint] commission is operating, and we hope that technology transfer will bring good results”. 

In the meantime, Morales is in full election mode.

Credit: Instagram. @evomoralesayma

His opposition is echando el grito al cielo, but Morales continues his seemingly swift ride to reelection. In his social media he has been sharing images of events such as this caravan in the iconic site of Cochabamba, an icon of indigenous struggle. Love him or hate him, no one can deny he is a masterful politician. 

And of course the photo-op “putting out fires” in the Bolivian Amazonia.

Credit: Instagram. @evomoralesayma

This image is kind of poetic. Yes, Bolivia should do its part in fighting the fires in the Amazon rainforest, but Morales seems to be ignoring the political fires that threaten to undermine democracy in the country. In the meantime, he has criticized the aid promised by the G7 (the group of the most powerful countries in the world). As reported by AFP, Morales said in an interview with Radio Panamericana: “I welcome that small, small, tiny contribution of $20 million from the G7 — that is not help, it is part of a shared co-responsibility, as all peoples have the obligation to preserve the ecosystem”. This anti-establishment rhetoric is exactly what might get him another electoral win. 

In fact, he “temporarily interrupted” his reelection campaign to oversee the environmental crisis.

Credit: Twitter. @chamberohoy

With the election looming and the opposition getting combative, how come Morales interrupted his campaign? This is a smart political move: he acts presidential to get voters to think mejor malo por conocido que bueno por conocer. 

From Being Cooks To Being Mountain Climbers, These Bolivian Mujeres Are Challenging The Machismo Culture That Exists In Their Country

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From Being Cooks To Being Mountain Climbers, These Bolivian Mujeres Are Challenging The Machismo Culture That Exists In Their Country

While living in a machista country, these women are taking a stance and climbing ice cold mountains…in their skirts.

An indigenous group of women in Bolivia, known as “Cholitas,” are mostly recognized for their traditional attire, including round hats, large earrings, and colorful skirts. These women are sticking to their indigenous attire while they battle against gender roles of women in Bolivia.

What started off as a group of women who once worked as cooks in the mountains, then turned into a group of women who had a passion for mountain climbing. Leader of the mountain climbing Cholitas, Jimena Lidia Huayales, points out the criticism they’ve received such as, “How could a woman climb a mountain? That’s wrong!” Although mountain climbing is not under the expected criteria of what it means to be a “proper” Bolivian woman, being on top of a mountain is what makes them feel so free – above the world and above every oppressive inequality.

READ: Listen To The Pep Talk This Latina Told Herself As She Stepped Into Work As The Only Woman Firefighter In Her Team

Aren’t these women incredible? Don’t forget to comment and hit the share button below!