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There is an Island in Brazil That is Completely Inhabited By Poisonous Snakes

Ilha da Queimada Grande is a small Brazilian island with a terrible reputation. Have people died there? Sure. Was it painful? You better believe it. But what is it exactly that has people running from this paradise on Earth?

Bem-vindo ao Ilha da Queimada Grande.

A ilha….#ilhadaqueimadagrande #themostdangerousislandintheworld #jararacailhoa

A video posted by Brunno Frejat Zacchi (@brunnofrejat) on

This small island off the coast of Sao Paulo also has a deadly reputation.

Ilha da Queimada Grande juga digelar Pulau Ular berkeluasan 430,000 meter persegi di luar pantai São Paulo, Brazil. Pulau ini adalah habitat kepada pelbagai spesies ular seperti Bothrops dan Golden Lancehead Viper. Menurut rancangan dokumentari Discovery Channel mendakwa terdapat sebanyak satu ular bagi satu meter persegi, manakala legenda tempatan Brazil pula mendakwa terdapat lima ekor ular setiap meter persegi. Pada masa ini, Tentera Laut Brazil melarang orang awam ke pulau itu, walaupun kadang-kadang saintis mendapat pengecualian. Ade saintis tak kat sini? Jom!!! #atokdean #matiitubenar #malaysianig #igers #igersmalaysia #igersmalaya #igersmy #ikutcarakita #lokalah #travel #holiday #vacation #brazil #saopaulo #island #snakeisland #IlhadaQueimadaGrande

A photo posted by FAKTA ATOK DEAN (@atokdean) on

The island is infested with an extremely poisonous snake: the golden lancehead viper.

#JararacaIlhoa #InstitutoButantan #SãoPaulo #SP #BothropsInsularis

A photo posted by Schii Schmitz (@schiischmitz) on

How poisonous? Its venom can kill a bird instantly. Oh, and it will also MELT human flesh.

peele-sweating

It’s cousin, the lancehead viper, lives on mainland Brazil and is responsible for 90 percent of snake bite-related deaths in the country.

Jararaca
Credit: Wikimedia

That number does not include the golden lancehead viper because they’re all chillin’ on that island.

And there’s thousands of them. The Brazilian navy has banned access to the island due to the number of snakes.

But that doesn’t mean people don’t go to the island. In fact, some people have to. A few brave souls do maintenance on a lighthouse.

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Credit: Vice / YouTube

Yeah. There’s a damn lighthouse on an island deemed unsafe for humans.

Even though the lighthouse is now automated, things break down and need fixing.

Brave Souls
Credit: Vice / YouTube

And these brave, brave men make the journey through the island to make sure the lighthouse keeps working. #madrespect

Something tells me not a lot of people sign up for that job.

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Credit: Orphan Black / Temple Street Productions / helenaneedsahug / Tumblr

Who in their right mind would?

READ: Something Washed Up on the Shore in Paraguay and People are Screaming “Chupacabra”

So how did the snake take over an island? Simple.

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Credit: NatGeoWild / YouTube

Experts believe that thousands of years ago, water levels rose high enough to create the island of Ilha da Queimada Grande, which isolated the snakes from the rest of Brazil. The snakes were then forced to evolve differently from the snakes on the mainland. With no prey available on land, the snakes slither up trees and kill migrating birds that stop on the island.

There are no other predators or competition on the island, so the snakes have the island all to themselves.

Snake
Credit: Vice / YouTube

Do your thing, dude. No one is here to bother you.

Is this the first time you have heard about Snake Island? Share the story with your friends so they can all see just how crazy nature can be.

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Someone Mutilated A Manatee With The Name ‘Trump’— Now There’s A Federal Investigation

Things That Matter

Someone Mutilated A Manatee With The Name ‘Trump’— Now There’s A Federal Investigation

Michael Wood/Stocktrek Images

Just when we thought Trump supporters couldn’t disgust us more, one disfigured a manatee by etching “Trump” into its back.

Sadly, over the weekend, a manatee was found in Florida’s Homosassa River with the name “Trump” scratched into its back. The discovery has prompted federal officials to open an investigation into the disfigurement of the threatened species.

A mutilated manatee was found over the weekend with the name Trump scratched into its back.

According to a report published by the Citrus County Chronicle, it is unclear when and how the manatee was mutilated. It is also unknown whether the current investigation has made any leads in regards to the perpetrators. Still, footage of the abused animal has sparked outrage online.

Douglas Nowacek, a professor of Conservation Technology at Duke University told Vice that the incident is “one of the most horrifying things I have ever seen done to a wild animal.” In a separate email, Ruth Carmichael, a Senior Marine Scientist at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and a Professor of Marine Sciences at the University of South Alabama described the act a “horrific” to VICE saying “I have no words to express how deeply troubling, thoughtless, and potentially cruel this is.” 

Marine biologists say that it is unclear just how much harm the mammal endured.

“It’s a little hard to see the extent of damage from the video,” Carmichael explained. “It is harassment regardless. If the scrape penetrates the skin, then it likely caused some pain and stress. The animals have nerves and sensory hairs in the skin. Additionally, open wounds could become infected.” 

According to Graham Worthy, Department Chair and Pegasus Professor at the University of Central Florida who spoke to VICE the letters could mostly be shallow, and may mostly be algae scraped off the animal’s back making“ injury would be virtually non-existent.”

Still, physically hurt or not, the manatee in question was clearly harassed by a person. As such the perpetrator could face severe penalties if found. 

“Violations of the Marine Mammal Protection Act may result in fines of up to $100,000 and one year’s imprisonment for individuals and up to $200,000 for organizations,” Worthy told Vice. “It is illegal to approach and make contact with these animals let alone deface or injure them. It is illegal to feed or harass wild marine mammals including dolphins, porpoises, whales, seals, sea lions, and manatees. You are not allowed to feed, swim with, or harass these marine animals… They should be observed from a distance of at least 50 yards.”

The mutilated manatee is a West Indian manatee and is a herbivorous mammal found in coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. Up until 2017, the species was considered endangered by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Today, conservation status is listed as “threatened.”  

As many users of social media have noted, perhaps one of the most disturbing aspects of the images that humans already cause so much pain and suffering to innocent animals. When does it stop?

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A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

Culture

A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

ricardostuckert / Instagram

Indigenous tribes are the most important connection between man and nature. These tribes have lived off the land before modern society and many have never interacted with modern society. Ricardo Stuckert is going through and documenting the indigenous Amazonian tribes in Brazil.

Ricardo Stuckert is photographing indigenous tribespeople in the Brazilian Amazon.

The indigenous community is something sacred that most people agrees should be protected. They are more connected to the land than we are. Their customs and traditions are more ingrained in this world than ours are and it is so important to protect them.

The indigenous community of Brazil has been subjected to horrible attacks and conditions from the Brazilian government.

One of the most widespread attacks against the indigenous Brazilians living in the Amazon has been for the land. President Jair Bolsonaro has tried to take land away from the indigenous communities to allow for logging and mining. A bill he sent to the congress sought to exploit the land for commercial purposes, even legalizing some of the attacks we have seen on indigenous people since President Bolsonaro took power.

Stuckert wants to preserve the indigenous culture and customs through photos.

“I think it is important to disseminate Brazilian culture and show the way that native peoples live today,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “In 1997, I started to photograph the Amazon and had my first contact with the native people of Brazil. Since then, I have tried to show the diversity and plurality of indigenous culture, as well as emphasize the importance of the Indians as guardians of the forest. There are young people who are being born who have never seen or will see an Indian in their lives.”

The photographer believes that using photography is the best way to share culture.

“I think that photography has this power to transpose a culture like this to thousands of people,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “The importance of documentary photojournalism is to undo stigmas and propagate a culture that is being lost. We need to show the importance of indigenous people to the world, for the protection of our forests.”

You can see all of Stuckert’s photos on his Instagram.

Stuckert’s work to documented the indigenous community is giving people an insight into a life many never see. Brazil is home to about 210 million people with around 1 million having indigenous heritage. The diverse indigenous community of Brazil is something important to showcase and that’s what Stuckert is doing.

READ: Indigenous Photographer Diego Huerta’s Photos Of Oaxaca’s Indigenous People Celebrates Their Beauty

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