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The Week in Photos: Olympic-sized Pollution in Brazil, Danny Trejo’s Concealed Weapons and Becky G’s New Role

Credit: miguelVEVO / YouTube

Miguel and his lover bring some interesting toys to bed in his latest video, “…goingtohell.”

Photo Credit: Jim Rogash / Getty

Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Pedro Martinez waves to fans during a ceremony to retire his number at Fenway Park. Earlier this month, Martinez was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Photo Credit: Matthew Stockman / Getty

Guanabara Bay in Brazil, the site for next year’s 2016 Rio Olympic sailing competition, remains filthy, despite promises to clean 80% of the pollution by the start of the Olympics. A marine biologist told the Guardian: “What you have there is basically raw sewage.”

Photo Credit: @juli_lopezs / Instagram

Colombian model Juliana Lopez could face the death penalty or life in prison after being busted for drug possession in China. Lopez was arrested for allegedly smuggling “psychoactive drugs” in her laptop.

Photo Credit: Christopher Polk / Getty

Becky G will be on your TV. The 18-year-old pop singer will be a guest star in the forthcoming season of the mega-hit show Empire.

Photo Credit: Tommaso Boddi / Getty

Danny Trejo shows off the daggers in his blazer during a press tour for season two of Robert Rodriguez’s From Dusk Till Dawn.

Do you think Brazil will be ready for the 2016 Olympics? What role do you think Becky G will play in Empire? Let us know in the comments below.

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Brazil Just Passed a Bill That Will Allow Rich Corporations to ‘Skip the Line’ for COVID-19 Vaccines

Things That Matter

Brazil Just Passed a Bill That Will Allow Rich Corporations to ‘Skip the Line’ for COVID-19 Vaccines

Photo via Getty Images

Currently, Brazil is one of the world’s epicenters of the coronavirus. In March 2021, Brazil saw 66,573 COVID-19-related deaths. That means 1 in every 3 COVID-related deaths worldwide are occuring in Brazil.

And it doesn’t appear that the numbers will be slowing down anytime soon. While the United States is making strides in their COVID-19 vaccine distribution, Brazil is lagging far behind. And things are about to get a lot more complicated.

On Tuesday, Brazil passed a bill that would allow corporations to buy up as many vaccines as they can get their hands on, and privately distribute them to their employees first.

Elected officials in Brazil are arguing that the country has become so desperate to vaccinate its citizens, that it doesn’t matter who gets the vaccines first at this point.

The country, once renowned for having one of the most robust and efficient public vaccine-distribution programs in the world, has failed to make strides towards getting their citizens vaccinated.

“We are at war,” said the leader of the chamber, Arthur Lira. “And in war, anything goes to save lives.” We don’t know about you, but usually when it comes to war, we’ve heard that soldiers prioritize the health and safety of young, the weak, and the elderly before their own? We digress…

Brazil’s plan to privatize the vaccine rollout has brought up moral and ethical questions.

From the beginning, the World Health Organization has asked countries to first prioritize essential health workers and then high-risk populations when distributing the vaccine.

Anything other than that would promote a pay-to-play schemes in which the rich could protect their lives before poor people could. And poor people are more likely to die from COVID-19 in the first place.

As Alison Buttenheim, behavioral scientist and expert on the equitable allocation of the COVID-19 vaccine said, vaccine distribution should not “exacerbate disparities and inequities in health care,” but instead address them. Brazil’s vaccine rollout plan would fail to do any of the above.

If countries begin to allow the rich to prioritize their own interests during the vaccine rollout, the consequences could be disastrous.

In a time when the world is stoked by fear and uncertainty, the worst thing that can happen is for rich companies to exacerbate inequalities by effectively choosing who lives or dies.

As the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization said at the beginning of the global vaccine rollout: “any distribution of vaccines should advance human well-being and honor global equity, national equity, reciprocity, and legitimacy.”

Poor Brazilians should not be left to fend for themselves against COVID-19 simply because they are poor.

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Top 10 All-Women Collaborations in Latin Music

Latidomusic

Top 10 All-Women Collaborations in Latin Music

In honor of Women’s History Month, Latido Music has lined up 10 of our favorite all-women collaborations in Latin Music. In no particular order, here’s 10 girl-power anthems that we should be bumping all year long.

“Sin Pijama”

Mexican-American singer Becky G flipped the script on the antiquated idea that two women couldn’t get a hit together when she collaborated with Dominican reggaetonera Natti Natasha. Their fun and flirty music video for “Sin Pijama” has racked up over 1.8 billion on views on YouTube, outpacing some of top reggaetoneros. Following the success of this knockout duo, collaboration among women in Latin music has been on the rise, and we love to see it.

“Tick Tock”

Mexican pop icon Thalía has been one of the top proponents for all-women collaborations. She became the first Mexican female artist to score a billion a views on YouTube with “No Me Acuerdo” featuring Natasha. On 2018’s Valiente album, Thalía also teamed up with Argentine pop princess Lali for “Lindo Pero Bruto.” Last year, Thalía joined forces with her Latin Music Queens co-stars, fellow Mexicana Sofía Reyes and Colombian rapper Farina, for the empowering “Tick Tock.” The trio of women didn’t have time for any foolishness.

“Tusa”

Trini-American superstar Nicki Minaj got all up her in reggaeton gig on Karol G’s “Tusa.” She was even singing a bit in Spanish with the Colombian reggaetonera. Last year, Minaj had everyone, even the guys, singing, “Ahora soy una chica mala.” This was a regal bop fit for two queens and they wore that crown well. The song also garnered Minaj her first Latin Grammy nomination. That’s the power of “La Tusa.”

“No Al Aguacil”

One overlooked all-women collaboration is Mexican goddess Gloria Trevi’s “No Al Aguacil” with fellow Mexicana Paulina Rubio. The song was never released as a single (thought it should’ve been one) and it’s buried in Trevi’s 2011 album Gloria. Very much reflecting the early 2010s, “No Al Aguacil” is an electro-pop moment that these pop icons served with plenty of girl power.

“22”

In 2019, Argentine pop princess Tini came through with one of the best collaborations of the year. For kiss-off anthem “22,” she teamed up with Colombian singer Greeicy. Tini, who was turning 22 at the time, was not going to let any heartbreak rain on her birthday celebrations. Greeicy served as another voice of reason for why crying over that guy would not be worth it. This cumbiatón moment was everything.

“Santería”

Last year, Spanish star Lola Índigo recruited Mexican pop princess Danna Paola and Chilean singer Denise Rosenthal for “Santería.” Each woman adds their own flair and attitude to this bubbling pop cauldron. Like the Charmed sisters, the power of three is real here, and together these women serve a spellbinding collaboration.

“Ladrón”

Argentine pop princess Lali teamed up with Argentina’s top woman in Latin trap, Cazzu, last year. The alluring “Ladrón” was a moment of girl power that highlighted the talent in their country. The two women united in turning the tables on a no-good men. “You wanted to play me… the one that’s playing you is me,” Lali and Cazzu sang together.

“High” Remix

Last year, rising Argentine singer Maria Becerra upped the girl power of her breakthrough hit “High.” For the all-women remix, she teamed up with Índigo and her compatriot Tini. Together, they also upped the angst factor on this mesmerizing, trap-lite bop.  

“La Rueda”

Ivonne Galaz and Natalie López are making way for women in the male-dominated corridos tumbados space. As the two women signed to the Rancho Humilde record label, they teamed up for “La Rueda” on last year’s Corridos Tumbados Vol. 2 album. What a moment to hear two Mexicanas find strength in each other’s stories of overcoming the struggle. Galaz and López tap into an emotion in the genre that the guys can’t touch.

“Modo Turbo”

Three Brazilian queens joined forces for last year’s “Modo Turbo.” Anitta and Luísa Sonza aligned with drag pop superstar Pabllo Vittar. “Fasten your seatbelt / Turbo mode,” Sonza encouraged in Portuguese. They certainly took their fans for a wild ride with this fierce and stellar collaboration.  

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Read: Natti Natasha Assembles “Las Nenas” Video with Farina, Cazzu, and La Duraca

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