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Here’s The Trailer For The New Los Tigres del Norte Documentary, ‘Jefe De Jefes’

Credit: Amateur Films / YouTube

“They like to tell stories about the people. That’s what makes them different.”

For decades, Los Tigres del Norte have been one of Mexico’s most popular and respected Norteño bands. Los Tigres, led by Jorge Hernandez, built a loyal following by writing songs about love, the struggles of immigration, and the U.S.-Mexico drug trade. They’ve won countless Grammys, appeared in movies, and collaborated with some of the most recognized names in music. But it almost never happened.

In a trailer for the documentary “Jefe de Jefes,” Hernandez says that as a kid, he dreamed of a much different career path. “I didn’t want to become a musician. I wanted to study,” says Hernandez. Directed by Olallo Rubio, the documentary features musicians, actors and academics breaking down what makes Los Tigres a once-in-a-generation band.


QUIZ: How Well Do You Know ‘Tragos De Amargo Licor’?

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Sasha Calle Is Officially The DC Universe’s First-Ever Latina Supergirl

Entertainment

Sasha Calle Is Officially The DC Universe’s First-Ever Latina Supergirl

The DC Universe just got a heck of a lot more Brown.

This week, it was announced that 25-year-old actress Sasha Calle is poised to be the franchise’s newest superstar. Known for portraying Lola Rosales on “The Young and the Restless,” the actress will take on the role of Supergirl in the DC film franchise.

Her first appearance as Supergirl expected to debut in the upcoming movie “The Flash.”

Calle, who is of Colombian heritage, is set to become the first Latina ever to play the role of Supergirl.

Calle earned her first breakout role in 2018 after being cast in the long-running CBS daytime drama “The Young & The Restless” as a food truck owner and the youngest sister of brothers in the midst of a toxic rivalry.

Calle earned a Daytime Emmy nomination in the Outstanding Young Performer in a Drama Series category last year for her part in the series.

“On behalf of everyone at ‘The Young and the Restless,’ we’d like to congratulate Sasha Calle on making history and being chosen to play the first Latina Supergirl,” the daytime drama’s executive producer Anthony Morina and co-executive producer/head writer Josh Griffith shared in a statement. “The role of Supergirl is a perfect fit for someone of Sasha’s immense talent, and we wish her all the best as she takes on this groundbreaking role.”

According to Deadline, Calle beat out 425 actresses for the part of Supergirl.

Andy Muschietti director of The Flash gave Calle the good news about her role over Zoom.

“Can I freak out for a second?” Calle asked before announcing the news to someone offscreen. “I got it,” she said to the person off-camera while doing a dance in her chair. Turning back to Muschietti, Calle admitted “I’m probably not going to stop crying all day.”

Calle shared the moment to her Instagram admitting she was still processing the big news.

“A Latina superhero?!” Calle wrote of the news in Spanish. “On what planet?! Well, on this planet! What joy and what pride.” Thanking her mom, Calle wrote, “I adore you with everything I have. You are an example of a superhero.”

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This Teacher Received A Nissan Pickup Truck Decked Out As A Mobile Classroom

Things That Matter

This Teacher Received A Nissan Pickup Truck Decked Out As A Mobile Classroom

Like students around the world, kids in Mexico have been forced to take school online or tune into programming on public TV in order to learn. But that’s just the kids who are lucky enough to have access to Internet or a TV. Many students live in rural areas and lack the adequate resources to continue their studies amid the global pandemic.

But thankfully, there are many good samaritans out there (aka compassionate teachers) who have invented their own ways to bring the classroom to kids wherever they are.

A Mexican teacher was gifted a decked out pickup truck by Nissan.

Since schools were forced to close last year in April, Aguascalientes special education teacher Nallely Esparza Flores, has been driving four hours a day to educate students one-on-one at their homes from her truck bed, outfitted with a small table and chairs.

News of her project spread across social media, eventually reaching the corporate offices of Nissan México. This week, the company surprised Esparza with the gift of a new pickup truck specially outfitted with a small open-air mobile classroom built into the truck’s bed.

“Today I feel like my labors and the help that we give each day to children and their families is unstoppable,” she said on Twitter Wednesday, sharing photos of her new vehicle. “My students no longer have to take classes in the full heat of the sun,” she said.

Nissan representatives said they decided to give Esparza the adapted NP300 model, 4-cylinder truck after hearing her story because she was “an example of perseverance and empathy.”

“When we learned about the incredible work of this teacher, we got together to discuss in what way we could contribute to this noble work,” said Armando Ávila, a vice president of manufacturing.

The mobile classroom is pretty legit and will allow Esparza to continue her good deed.

Esparza inside her new classroom.

The decked out Nissan pickup truck has three walls (the other is a retractable sheeting) and a ceiling made with translucent panels to protect teacher and student from the elements while letting in natural light.

It also has retractable steps for easy access to the classroom, electrical connections, a whiteboard and an easily disinfected acrylic table and benches that are foldable into the wall to provide space. The table also has a built-in plexiglass barrier to allow social distancing.

Access to education in Mexico is highly inequitable.

Esparza, like many teachers across the country, found that not all distance learning was equal. Many of her students in Cavillo were from poor families without internet access. So she used social media networks to keep in touch with such students via cell phones, but even that was not necessarily an available option for all — and not ideal. Finally, she decided to solve the problem by hitting the road in her pickup truck.

According to the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), only 58% of students in Mexico had a home computer – the lowest percentage among all OECD countries. And only about one third (32%) of the school computers in rural schools in Mexico were connected to
the Internet, compared to more than 90% for schools located in urban areas.

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