Entertainment

This Baller Proved Mexicans Don’t Just Excel At Baseball, Boxing And Soccer

If you’re a fan of March Madness, you probably remember Lorenzo Mata.

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Credit: Jamie Squire / Getty

He’s the center from UCLA who went to a bunch of Final Fours and won several Pac-10 titles with the Bruins.

Mata was a big reason for UCLA’s three straight Final Four appearances.

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Credit: Stephen Dunn / Getty

From 2006 to 2008, Mata teamed up with future NBA players Kevin Love, Russell Westbrook, Jordan Farmar and Arron Afflalo at UCLA. During Mata’s senior year, Mata accepted a move to the bench to make way for Kevin Love, providing energy off the bench.

He was also the pride of South Gate, California.

Credit: @14Matador14/Instagram

Mata has always represented his hometown of South Gate, California. He didn’t leave his city to play for a powerhouse private school. Mata stayed to play for South Gate High and took it to new heights.

Making it to UCLA’s storied basketball squad is no small feat, and Mata became an inspiration for other Latino ballers.

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Credit: Victor Decolongon / Getty

In 2008, Raymond Villalba, a South Gate High student, told the Los Angeles Times, “There haven’t been many Hispanics who do great at basketball. But he’s also getting a degree from UCLA and that doesn’t happen for many of us either. He’s a great role model.”

And Mata is grateful that his mother helped keep him on track.

Credit: @14matador14 / Instagram

Ron Davis, Mata’s high school history teacher, told the Los Angeles Times, “When I had him for U.S. history as an 11th grader, at first I noticed he wasn’t doing all the work. I spoke to his mother and his coach and pretty soon Lorenzo was buckling down. He was no dummy at all.”

So where’s Mata now? In Mexico, playing pro ball…

Credit: @14Matador14/Instagram

Mata went undrafted out of UCLA in 2008. That year, Mata joined the Los Angeles Lakers’ Summer League team with hopes of getting more attention from scouts. The center’s top choice was to play in Spain, but that soon changed and Mata elected to play his trade in Mexico.

He also plays for Mexico’s National Team, where he’s earned the nickname “El Matador.”

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Credit: LatinContent / Getty

Mata dreamed of playing for the NBA, but he’s still living the dream, bringing gold to his home away from home.

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Credit: LatinContent / Getty

Mata and the Mexican National Team captured the FIBA Americas Championship after defeating Puerto Rico in 2013. Mata was also a silver medalist with Mexico at the 2011 Pan American Games.

He’s currently playing for Pioneros in Cancún, Quintana Roo.

Credit: @14matador14 / Instagram

Not only does he have fans in Mexico…

Credit: @14Matador14

Yep, that’s Jesse Huerta of the pop group Jesse y Joy.

He’s also got lots of fans in Puerto Rico.

Credit: @14Matador14/Instagram

Why? Mata won the Baloncesto Superior Nacional championship with the Piratas de Quebradillas in 2013.

CHAMPIONS!!!!!!!! #piratasahi #puertorico #beastmode @cynthiacamacho_m

A video posted by LORENZO MATA (@14matador14) on

Credit: @14Matador14

Mata’s success in Mexico and playing club in Puerto Rico has led to many wild celebrations like this one.

Now that he’s made an impact in Mexico and Puerto Rico, Mata wants to continue inspiring young Latino basketball players.

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Credit: LatinContent / Getty

The list of NBA players from Mexico or with Mexican roots is slim. Although Mata doesn’t play in the NBA, his success with the Mexican National Team could inspire more Latinos to think big on the basketball court.

READ: Meet Some of the Latino Football Players Who Made NFL History

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Aaron Hernandez’s Fiancée Opens Up About Netflix’s Speculation Over The Football Player’s Sexuality

Entertainment

Aaron Hernandez’s Fiancée Opens Up About Netflix’s Speculation Over The Football Player’s Sexuality

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“Killer Inside: The Mind Of Aaron Hernandez” is a new Netflix docu-series that explores the life of late football player Aaron Hernandez. The docu-series has sparked a lot of controversy over how the director explored Hernandez’s sexuality. Now, his family members are finally speaking out.

Aaron Hernandez’s brother spoke with Dr. Oz about the documentary highlighting his brother’s brain injuries.

Jonathan Hernandez was asked to help with the Netflix docu-series but turned down the offer because he didn’t feel right about it. However, he does think some part of the docu-series are important.

“I think there’s so much tragedy within this and things that can be gained for other people’s benefit that the dollar amount was the least significant thing,” Jonathan told Dr. Oz. “It’s more so what was at hand and what can we collectively do so someone who is growing up isn’t in this situation in the near future or down the road.”

Aaron’s fiancée also opened up about the docu-series and the tragedy surrounding Aaron.

Shayanna Jenkins also confirms that Netflix approached her for the docu-series and offered her compensation but she didn’t want to participate. Instead, she wanted to keep moving forward with her life.

“If he did feel that way or if he felt the urge, I wish that I — I was told,” Jenkins told ABC. “And I wish that he — you know, he would’ve told me ’cause I wouldn’t — I would not have loved him any differently. I would have understood. It’s not shameful and I don’t think anybody should be ashamed of who they are inside, regardless of who they love. I think it’s a beautiful thing, I just wish I was able to tell him that.”

Fans of Aaron are upset with the docu-series and how they handled themselves in the making of the show.

A lot of the show talks about Aaron’s perceived sexuality and how it factored into his crimes. The docu-series has been criticized for bringing up a very sensitive subject when Aaron is not around to defend himself.

The obsession with his sexuality is really upsetting people.

There is nothing wrong with someone’s sexuality. However, to attach a sexuality to a person who is dead is a low blow.

Out of all the noise surrounding Aaron, one person is being praised for their resilience.

Credit: @versaceclip / Twitter

What do you think about the docu-series about Aaron Hernandez and his life?

READ: New Investigative Report Reveals Aaron Hernandez’s Gay Relationship And His Erratic Behavior With NFL Players

A New Study Shows That Diehard Soccer Fans Are Putting Themselves At A Risk Of A Heart Attacks From Stress

Entertainment

A New Study Shows That Diehard Soccer Fans Are Putting Themselves At A Risk Of A Heart Attacks From Stress

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That fútbol stress is real you guys, like, physically real. A study revealed that soccer fans experience such intense levels of physical stress while they watch their team, they could be putting themselves at risk of a heart attack. You read that right. Fútbol fans get so invested in their team’s games that they are putting themselves at physical risk.

They don’t call it ‘la pasión’ for nothing. 

Growing up Latino, you definitely jumped when your dad and tíos got over-excited screaming “GOL” during fútbol matches.  Eventually, we joined in. Now, it turns out that the stress and the nerve-wracking anticipation of what’ll happen next are actually damaging. Like, for real.  A study by the University of Oxford suggested that fans of soccer are putting themselves under some serious stress when they watch their team.

The Oxford study tested saliva from Brazilian fans during their historic loss to Germany at the 2014 World Cup.

The study found levels of the hormone cortisol rocketed during the 7-1 home defeat in the semi-final.

Particularly devoted fans are more at risk of experiencing dangerous levels of the ‘fight or flight’ hormone cortisol.

Cortisol is a hormone commonly associated with stress. ‘Fans who are strongly fused with their team – that is, have a strong sense of being ‘one’ with their team – experience the greatest physiological stress response when watching a match,’ Dr. Martha Newson, a researcher at the Centre for the Study of Social Cohesion, University of Oxford, told BBC. ‘Fans who are more casual supporters also experience stress, but not so extremely.’ This study was published in the journal Stress and Health.

This increase in blood pressure and strain on the heart can be very dangerous.

The researchers found no difference in stress levels between men and women during the game, despite preconceptions men are more “bonded to their football teams”.

Raised cortisol can also give people a feeling of impending doom.

This feeling of doom can be defined as a sense that their life is in danger or they are under attack. Previous research has shown an increase in heart attacks among fans on important match days, whether supporting club or country. Prolonged high levels of cortisol can: constrict blood vessels, raise blood pressure and damage an already weakened heart.

There are many health conditions tied to extreme stress that hardcore football fans should be aware of. 

While cortisol is essential to responding to life’s daily stresses, too much cortisol over time can result in a suppressed immune system (more coughs and colds and even allergies), weight gain, and heightened blood pressure with a significant risk of heart disease. Bottom line, all this soccer-induced stress can be pretty dangerous.

In their study, the University of Oxford researchers tracked cortisol levels in 40 fans’ saliva before, during and after three World Cup matches

The most stressful by far was the semi-final. “It was a harrowing match – so many people stormed out sobbing,” Dr Newson told BBC. But the fans had used coping strategies such as humor and hugging to reduce their stress, bringing it down to pre-match levels by the final whistle.

It’s not all bad news though, experts suggest that these findings might be helpful in identifying fans who are at risk. 

From our research, we may be better equipped to identify which fans are most at risk of heart attacks,’ says Newson. ‘Clubs may be able to offer heart screenings or other health measures to highly committed fans who are at the greatest risk of experiencing increased stress during the game.’

The findings could also be relevant to improving crowd management strategies. 

Passionate soccer fans around the world have been known to engage in violent behaviors, such as hooliganism and other aggressive clashes. The findings could also be relevant to improving crowd management strategies.

The study ‘Devoted fans release more cortisol when watching live soccer matches’ can be read in the journal Stress and Health.

READ: These American Futbolistas Explain Why They Chose Mexico’s Pro League Over MLS