Culture

Taquero In Mexico Creates Donald Trump Taco And The Ingredients Are Hilarious

Credit: El Diario de Chihuahua / YouTube

“El de Donald Trump no se debería de comer.”

Tio Beto, a well-known taco vendor from Cuauhtémoc, Chihuahua, Mexico, has a new item on his menu – although he hopes no one eats it. Tio Beto, who has a habit of creating tacos inspired by celebrities and politicians, has created what he calls the Donald Trump taco. In an interview with El Diario de Chihuahua, Tio Beto revealed his recipe.

Here are the ingredients:

EL TACO DONALD TRUMP

A photo posted by Javier Risco (@jrisco) on

Credit: @jrisco / Instagram

Lots of tongue, very little brains and pig lips. ?❓?

READ: Hey L.A., Did Your Favorite Taco Truck Make The List?

What do you think of the Donald Trump taco? Click on the share button to discuss with your friends. 

Taco Tuesday Is Legally Trademarked But This Is Why That Doesn’t Really Mean Anything

Culture

Taco Tuesday Is Legally Trademarked But This Is Why That Doesn’t Really Mean Anything

@tacojohns

If you go out on a Tuesday, it’s pretty common to see signs at various establishments that say “Taco Tuesday.” You’ll also so see “Wine Wednesday,” “Thirsty Thursday,” “Friday Funday,” etc. These are what you call familiar catchphrases, which means they’re used all the time, by people all over the world. If you ask who invented these standard terms, you’d probably say that God did, or that they’ve just existed forever. Well, that mentality perhaps might be correct, but in this great country of weird laws, it doesn’t matter who invented something but rather who puts their claim on it by trademarking it first. 

A taco chain restaurant called Taco John’s — based in Cheyenne, Wyoming — trademarked the term “Taco Tuesday” in 1989, and is sick of people using the phrase.

According to the Associated Press, Taco John’s has 400 locations in 23 states. The phrase “Taco Tuesday” is only legal for them to use in all states except in New Jersey, where someone there also trademarked the phrase before them. Guess we will never who actually coined the term int he first place. 

But the real issue here is how it can be possible for any one establishment, especially independent ones, to stop using the term that is as common as “happy birthday.” 

For years, Taco John’s has been sending cease-and-desist letters to several eateries for their illegal use of “Taco Tuesday.” Most recently they targeted a brewery that doesn’t even profit from the sale of tacos.

Freedom’s Edge Brewing Co., located near the Taco John’s headquarters, was advertising a “taco truck that parks outside its establishment once a week,” and used the “Taco Tuesday” catchphrase. Taco John’s clearly saw it and was pissed because they sent Freedom’s Edge a cease-and-desist letter to stop advertising by using “Taco Tuesday.” 

“We have nothing against Taco John’s but do find it comical that some person in their corporate office would choose to send a cease and desist to a brewery that doesn’t sell or profit from the sales of tacos,” the brewery said in a statement, according to the AP. They also said they had no idea that “Taco Tuesday” was trademarked. Hey, we didn’t either. 

People on social media say Taco John’s have taken their trademark of “Taco Tuesday” too far. 

Antone Duran said on Facebook that Taco John’s is going after the wrong people and said the term is so common it’s unfair to target an independent establishment.  

“I’ve traveled 34 states and throughout the country, I’ve heard or read “taco Tuesday” at restaurants and bars,” Duran said. “Even where I live now in Palm Springs. And I guarantee most of those places never even heard of taco John’s. So perhaps they were quick to trademark it, but they sure as hell didn’t invent it. And I guarantee they’re not going after hundreds of other restaurants throughout the country to demanding they stop. Lol. Petty for them to go after this place.”

Legal experts say that Taco John’s, unfortunately (or fortunately for the rest of us) doesn’t stand much of a chance in the court system to legally demand places stop using “Taco Tuesday.”

Seattle-based attorney Michael Atkins told the AP the catchphrase is used so commonly that it’s almost impossible to go after each entity that uses it. “Taco Tuesday” has been used everywhere from small signages at the corner shop to commercials to movies. 

“It’s kind of asinine to me think that one particular taco seller, or taco maker, would have monopoly rights over ‘Taco Tuesday,'” Atkins told the publication. “It has become such a common phrase that it no longer points to Taco John’s and therefore Taco John’s doesn’t have the right to tell anybody to stop using that.”

In some ways, we kind of feel bad for Taco John’s. They went all-in on a phrase that ended up being super popular, and now they can’t even make a profit on it. On the other hand, they’re an established restaurant making millions off of Mexican food. They’ll survive.

READ: Cautionary Tale: A Fresno Man Died During A Taco-Eating Contest And People Are Left Wondering How

A Breastfeeding Mother Being Held By ICE Says That She Hasn’t Been Allowed To Breastfeed Her Daughter In Days

Things That Matter

A Breastfeeding Mother Being Held By ICE Says That She Hasn’t Been Allowed To Breastfeed Her Daughter In Days

screenshot / clarionledger.com

At this point, we sound like a broken record talking about the Trump administration’s immigration policies and the traumatizing effects such policies have on migrants traveling to the U.S. seeking a better life. Every week brings either gun violence against communities of color (made easier under the influence of Donald Trump’s hateful rhetoric against these same communities), more cases of ICE raids throughout the country, and even more cases of families being separated at the border. 

The most inhumane part of all of this continues to be the ways the Trump administration completely disregards children.

Guatemalan mother Maria Domingo-Garcia has been in Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody for nearly a week. 

She’s the mother of three and has been separated from her 4-month old daughter who she still breastfeeds. Maria Domingo-Garcia ended up in detention since being picked up during an ICE raid at Koch Foods in Morton, Mississippi. She was among the 680 undocumented immigrants that were detained earlier this month. 

According to CNN, Domingo-Garcia is being held at a facility in Jena, Louisiana. The facility is nearly 200 miles from Morton. The Mississippi Clarion Ledger, who first reported the story, followed the 4-month-old baby’s father new journey in having to raise his three young children on his own, after Domingo-Garcia’s detention. However, he’s still facing his own deportation proceedings with his next court date set for 2021.  

Now, the 4-month-old baby girl is left without her breastfeeding mother. According to CNN, when a woman is breastfeeding, the body continues to produce milk and if the milk isn’t “expressed” then it could cause pain and swelling. 

According to an ICE spokesman, all detainees receive a “medical screening upon intake” and if a woman says that she’s breastfeeding or nursing, she may be released. 

However, ICE is reportedly saying that Domingo-Garcia answered “no” when she was asked this question.  

But Domingo-Garcia’s attorney’s (Ray Ybarra Maldonado and Juliana Manzanarez with Justice For Our Neighbors) are saying that “ICE is, once again, lying. She said nobody’s asked her—not even one time—if she’s been breastfeeding.” 

Dalila Reynoso, an advocate with Justice For Our Neighbors and the two attorney’s are working with the family’s immigration case. “They hope the circumstances — the age of the infant, the breastfeeding and the woman’s lack of a criminal history — could convince immigration officials to let her out on bond quickly,” according to the Clarion Ledger.

Many on social media took to condemn ICE and the administration for keeping this mother away from her month-old daughter and other children.

“The Trump administration is keeping a mother from her four-month-old baby, who is still breastfeeding, and two other children after the ICE raids in Mississippi,” one tweet read. 

2020 Democratic Presidential nominee Kamala Harris also tweeted about the abuse of human rights by our own government.

“When will it end?” the California senator tweeted.

Of course, it didn’t take long for Ivanka Trump to share a social post that was severely ill-timed and out-of-touch.

The daughter of the president posted a photo of herself with her kids on the same week the news broke. Editor-in-chief of Rewire News, Jodi Jacobson, was quick to remind her of the mother being detained in ICE custody away from her children. Ivanka’s tweet could have been a coincidence but an ill-timed one at that. 

Twitter user Juan Escalante shared the story, adding that while she’s in her father’s care—her father is fighting his own deportation as he continues to raise the rest of his children without their mother.

According to Domingo-Garcia’s attorney’s, the mother is devastated knowing she can’t properly care for or nurture her daughter. 

Domingo-Garcia, originally from Guatemala, has lived in the U.S. for over 11 years. Aside from her 4-month-old baby girl, she has two songs, ages 3 and 11.

Her lawyers told CNN that the mother is “feeling the effects of having to suddenly stop breastfeeding.” The lawyer’s report, after visiting her in detention, that she’s “really depressed” and in pain from not being able to pump or breastfeed her baby girl.

This abuse of women’s rights in ICE detention facilities isn’t new and it also isn’t the only type. Earlier this year it was reported that nearly 30 women have miscarried while detained by ICE since 2017.

While her 4-month-old daughter and 3-year-old son might not fully grasp what’s happening to their mother right now, her 11-year-old son is a lot more aware and understands that his mother is gone. According to Domingo-Garcia’s lawyer’s, the 11-year-old son has said, “I want my mom back home. I don’t understand why they’re keeping her. She didn’t do anything wrong. We need her here.”

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