Culture

Do You Relate? Most Latinas Say They Had To Work ‘Twice As Hard’ As Non-Latino Co-Workers

The people at People en Español teamed up with Lieberman Research Worldwide to survey 500 Latinas* in the workforce to figure out how we really feel at work. Some of the “Latina@Work” findings are things we already know, like most of us often feel like we’re inhabiting at least two worlds at once. But here are some other interesting key findings we came away with after looking through the study’s results:


1. The study indicates that Latinas often feel caught between being perceived as “too Latina” at work and “not Latina enough” at home.

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Credit: HuffPost

The survey’s Latina respondents were also twice as likely to feel that they had to work “twice as hard” as their non-Latino co-workers “because of my cultural background.”

2. Eighty percent of respondents agreed with the statement, “At work, I want to be seen as who I really am, including being Latina.”

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Credit: dorawinifredread / Tumblr / Ain’t Your Mama / Def Jam Recordings

This sounds like common sense until you consider that 1) Latino, as a term describing a broad, diverse group of people of Latin American origin in the U.S., is still relatively new, and that 2) previous generations had different attitudes towards assimilation. It is, in a very real sense, a term that it is still being defined. And, increasingly, we’re defining it for ourselves.


3. Those surveyed believe they need to dress more conservative and style their hair a certain way to be taken seriously in the office.

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Credit: NBC

Thirty-one percent of the Latinas surveyed felt that they “dress more conservatively than my co-workers in order to be taken seriously” (vs. 21% of white, non-Latina women). Additionally, 35% said, “The way I style my hair impacts how successful I am at work” (vs. 25% of white non-Latinas). The survey doesn’t offer a breakdown according to race, which would have been interesting to see given the amount of scrutiny placed on black women, including black Latinas, when it comes to hairstyle. It would also have been interesting to delve deeper into what stereotypes about Latinas–such as that we’re curvier and more sexual than, say, white non-Latinas–plays when it comes to how we think about our image in the workplace.


4. However, we’re paving the way and breaking barriers.

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Credit: USA

Fifty-one percent of the Latinas surveyed are the first in their family to go to college. The big takeaway here is that we’re essentially a generation of women forming our own template for success. This is not to downplay the achievements made by those before us or to say that college is the only path to a meaningful future, but we should give ourselves credit, too!

Interestingly, when asked whether they “make it a priority to focus on my own needs,” only 47% of Latinas responded in the affirmative, compared to 69% of white non-Latinas.


…Also interesting that news of this study was the third result here:

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In short: Latinas are dealing with a diverse set of (sometimes conflicting) expectations from both within our community and outside of it, while continuing to define for ourselves what it means to be Latina.

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Credit: harleysqulnn / Tumblr

*Women who were surveyed were between ages 25–54, included white non-Latinas within the same age range, came from 5 major U.S. cities (Miami, New York City, Los Angeles, Dallas, and Charlotte) and represented various backgrounds (specifically Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Chilean, and Honduran).

Source: People en Español “Latina@Work Hispanic Opinion Tracker (HOT) Study* Overview

You can find the complete survey here.


READ: B.S. Latinas Put Up With (As Told By Disney Princesses)

Do you relate to these concerns? If you could give one piece of advice to a Latina about to enter the workforce, what would it be?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Latinas Are Offering Advice To Undocumented Women, New Moms And Those Who Are Struggling On How To Receive Affordable Therapy

Fierce

Latinas Are Offering Advice To Undocumented Women, New Moms And Those Who Are Struggling On How To Receive Affordable Therapy

ClassicStock / Getty

Finding the best psychologist or mental health worker for you isn’t an easy feat.

For one, finding someone you feel you can trust enough to open up to about your insecurities and inner turmoils is hard enough but finding someone who is covered by your health insurance can be even more difficult. On top of that, factors like location and time often come into play. Women of color in particular face a certain type of challenge when it comes to mental health care. According to the American Psychological Association, just 5.3% of psychologists in the United States are Black. Eighty-three percent are white. This means finding a mental health provider who can connect with your personal experiences can be beyond difficult.

We asked our users on Fierce for mental health provider tips and received some pretty inciteful answers.

Check them out below!


“Ask about sliding scales (cost based on income), check with insurance provider, apply for government-funded health care benefits, seek support from your child’s school—can refer you to a provider, college students can ask about on-campus services, workplace can also direct you to resources. Being resourceful is so important especially when it comes to our well-being. Hope this helps.” –karinalizlu

“Just started BetterHelp and they offer financial assistance. Got matched with the first therapist that I actually like after 10 years of trying. Highly recommend!”-marilynscarlet

“Ask your HR department if they have an Employment Assistance Program. If they do it means that the employer covers a certain amount of sessions with a therapist, counselor, psychologist, etc. which means you pay nothing for those first few sessions. Some EAP’s also cover the first meeting with financial advisors, lawyers & a bunch of other things!”- dee_anes

“I agree! So many times I’ve needed therapy but I couldn’t afford it. I’ve had to use what I got.” –ladinesphotographypage

“TherapyForBlackGirls.com has a great directory for BIPOC and POC!”-eileen.the.machine

“BetterHelp and SimplePractice are remote licensed therapist that offer sliding scale as low as $75 a session.”-rocio_rami5
“Some insurances are covering copays on sessions because of the pandemic! Check with your insurance!”- b_diaz990

“If your insurance includes Teledoc, each therapy session is $5 out of pocket. Yes it’s virtual, but everything else is right now! I truly appreciate my therapist and I’m grateful it’s not $40 a session like it used to be.”- livsimplyfl

“BetterHelp offers financial assistance.” –yessikahwamiwez

“Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is a good nationwide starting point: https://www.samhsa.gov.” – karinalizlu

“Check healingconnections-Therapy.com/blog. I’m a therapist and wrote a post on the accessibility of therapy. There’s therapy for every price point!” – gyera19

“Yes!!! 1000%. Many community colleges and universities have resources as part of student services. You can start there if you’re a student. Or reach out to a local therapist and ask if they know of local low cost options.” –runeatrepeat

“Federally qualified health care centers many times they offer counseling on a sliding fee scale!” –amor805

“If in Cali: reach out to Department of Mental Health. (DMH). If your child is under the age of 15 they can provide respite services. This is to help get a diagnosis or help families who have a child with a diagnosis.”- 143kimberly

“Hello! I am a graduate counseling student about to have my M.Ed in professional mental health counseling. Some long time friends and I have started a small business, and we’d love you to follow us along on our journey as well!” –mindful_resolutions4u

“We are Mindful Resolutions, a holistic wellness company that creates affordable courses based on the 8 dimensional model of wellness! Our goal is to bring wellness/mental health education and coping skills to people who wouldn’t normally be able to access or afford therapy, or for those who want an additional resource. A course is only $49.99 compared to $80 or more for an average therapy session!”- Mindful Resolutions


“Open season is coming up! Time to review your healthcare costs and make sure your insurance meets your needs. If there are barriers to preventing you from affording health insurance, check out state or local Medicaid and ACÁ options.” –brittsticks

@openpathpsychotherapy has sessions from $30-$60 and a wide selection of therapists that you can select based on their intersections (race, gender, etc) and what they specialize in.” –gangstahippie04


@backtalkservices has been a great resource for providing BIPOC LGBTQ folx with therapy.”- tytanjames

@openpathpsychotherapy one time membership fee then you can see a therapist for less than $60 a session. However much you and the therapist agree to. Highly recommend!” –mssantoyo

“Check out Therapists on @openpathpsychotherapy1w.” –therapy.girl

“For essential workers in California, therapy is being provided for free through www.covid19counselingca.com. @latinxtherapy is offering free therapy to farm workers and janitorial workers currently working in hospital settings anywhere in the US. And finally, for all others, @openpathpsychotherapy offers low cost therapy throughout the US.” –julimuli246

@contigo_wellness Nonprofit created to help make therapy more accessible!” –angelrod8032

@fiercebymitu we host free virtual Pranic Healing nights every Tuesday from 7:30pm to 10pm. The participant will enjoy twenty five minutes of energy healing focused on reducing stress, anxiety and tension. Please dm me for more info.”-marcelaarrietaofficial

@marinalcsw if you have any recommendations.”- leeladm

@therapyforlatinx has an incredible database of therapists!”- diosa_yesi

“Free therapy for undocumented youth through @immigrantsrising1w.” –yessbianca

“Affordable mental health care is important, but what about the wait times? My mother tried to get therapy but had to wait 6months before getting a session. This was BEFORE the pandemic. When affordable is important, so is wait time.”- hannibelle_

@fiercebymitu Cannabis can be used to check in and get a mental break. @calibueno.co we bring clean cannabis to diverse communities in the SF Bays area.” –calibueno.co

“If you’re in austin, tx there is sliding scale therapy and psychiatric care they austin Travis county integral care.” –ernipie

“National Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence Hotlines like 1-800-656-4673 (HOPE) can connect Survivors with local centers that offer many services—some include therapists and psychiatrists for medication, as well.” –godwasawoman

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Comadre A Comadre: Biden Invites Latina ‘Comadres’ To Join The Political Movement And Vote

Things That Matter

Comadre A Comadre: Biden Invites Latina ‘Comadres’ To Join The Political Movement And Vote

Marco Bello / Getty Images

The Latino community is a core part of the American story and it’s about time that our community is represented at all levels of government. As Latinos, we have endured generations of hate, racism, and cruel immigration policies that have left our communities wounded and in fear.

Although both Joe Biden and Donald Trump are trying to court the Latino vote to help push them over the finish line come November’s election, only Joe Biden has demonstrated his willingness to work alongside leading Latino voices.

To demonstrate that commitment, the Biden campaign has launched several grassroots movements meant to help build momentum and trust among the Latino community.

The Biden campaign has helped launch Comadre A Comadre, a campaign to bring together the Latino community in support of Democratic candidates.

Comadre A ComadrePosted by We are mitú on Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Women for Biden and Todos con Biden recently launched Comadre a Comadre. The nationwide initiative encourages Latinas to engage in politics and mobilize the vote for the 2020 election.

 “We know that the pathway to the White House is through the Latino community, and we know Latinas are the heart of our communities,” said Rep García. “It’s important that all of us–whether it’s our tía, our abuela, our comadre, our friend, our sister, our girlfriend–tell each other why this race is so important.”

Laura Jiménez, Latino Engagement Director for the Biden campaign explains: “Las comadres means a group of girlfriends, sisters, or close friends, and as we launch Comadre a Comadre, we want to bring the Latinas together and empower them to vote. There are so many of us who support Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, and we want to inspire a sense of unity, closeness, and strength as we work to get them elected.”

That unity, closeness, and strength is what they hope to achieve with this initiative, bringing Latinas together to mobilize for leadership that supports our community. Both Congresswomen are trailblazers in their own right: Mucarsel-Powell is the first Ecuadorian-American and South American immigrant member of Congress, while Garcia in one of the first Latinas to represent Texas.

The launch event was held online and featured leading Latina voices.

Launched last week, the debut event featured Congresswomen Debbie Mucarsel-Powell and Sylvia Garcia, who guided a conversation on the importance of the Latinx vote in battleground states like Florida. They were joined by Floridian community leaders Sonia Succar Ferré and Daniela Ferrera–two Latinas who are ready to get Biden and Harris elected.

Comadres love the chisme, and this time, the chisme is political. Throughout the hour-long conversation, they touched on some of the issues that disproportionately affect Latinx communities.

When asked about her hopes for Florida’s future, Sonia mentioned her concern about the mishandling of the COVID-19 crisis and the disregard for climate change. “Climate is something that we recognize is at our doorstep…we are a coastal community surrounded by water at all sides, and I want a leader and an administration that takes science, health data, and information seriously.”

“I want to help mobilize my fellow Puerto Ricans to realize that our future, our children’s future, and our environment are dependent on what we can do and how we can help deliver a win for Vice president Biden and Senator Harris,” shared Sonia.

Latinos will make up the largest racial minority in the electorate this year and candidates are working hard to get the vote.

For the first time in history, Latinos will be the largest minority in the electorate, with more than 32 million Latinos eligible to vote nationwide in the 2020 election. Comadre a Comadre is meant to highlight Latinas’ political power and to show what’s at stake for our community in this election.

Women are more likely to vote than men and Latinas are even more key to engaging our community since we tend to encourage our friends and family to vote as well. But don’t worry if you missed this kick off event. Comadre a Comadre has a full calendar of events, encouraging participants to join bilingual phone banks organized by the Biden campaign. For more information, check out their website here.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com