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Need More Chewie? The Force Is Strong With These Latino Memes

These memes make every day Estar Guars Day.

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#estarguars #funnypictures #funny #mexicanbelike #lol #lmao #starwars #mexicanstarwars

A photo posted by Gustavo De La Cruz (@game29836) on

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Credit: @NdeMitocondria / Twitter

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Credit: star wars funnies / Pinterest

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Credit: desmotivaciones.es

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Credit: desmotivaciones.es

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Credit: Chepo Peña

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Credit: imagenesgraciosas.com

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Credit: Star Wars Memes / Facebook

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Credit: memegenerator.net

Who’s your favorite character?  Click the share button and let us know. 

El Mando And Yodito Are The Latino Versions Of The Baby Yoda Memes We Didn’t Know We Needed

Entertainment

El Mando And Yodito Are The Latino Versions Of The Baby Yoda Memes We Didn’t Know We Needed

@latinxgeeks / Twitter

Jennifer Lopez was stopped on the red carpet to get her response to Internet sensation Baby Yoda, and, after being initially caught off guard, she told Variety that she, in fact, likes Baby Yoda. If you’re Latino and, so far, you’ve just “liked” all the Baby Yoda hype and memes, let us be the first to introduce you to the Latinized series of Baby Yoda – “Yodito.” Lil’ Yodito can be found listening to Daddy Yankee or “Despacito,” no matter how many times The Mandalorian, known by the Latino Internet as ‘Papi Mando,’ turns off the radio to their spaceship. Yodito uses VapoRub, and sips tea when their abuelita asks them about ‘el novio.’ 

Yodito sees us, and we hope J.Lo sees Lil’ Yodito in all their glory.

The verdict is still out on whether J.Lo actually knows what Baby Yoda is.

CREDIT: @VARIETY / TWITTER

The Variety reporter stopped Lopez on the red carpet of the 2019 IFP Gotham Awards at Cipriani Wall Street in New York to ask her if she’s “seen Baby Yoda.” Confusion washed over her face as she asked, “Baby Yoda? No.” The reporter tells the Nuyorican “Hustlers” producer and actress that she “has to see Baby Yoda.” She turns to someone else to ask, “What’s Baby Yoda?” As the woman begins to break down Baby Yoda to J.Lo, her glowing face breaks into a smile and she laughingly says, “Oh yes I have seen it. I like Baby Yoda. Baby Yoda’s amazing.”

For those of you who don’t live on the Internet, Baby Yoda is a character in Disney +’s The Mandalorian, a series set in the Star Wars universe. What the Internet calls “Baby Yoda” is scripted as “The Child,” who is the same species as Yoda, but appears as a small toddler, who has yet to speak a single word. The Child is actually a beautifully designed puppet, and the Mandalorian takes to him or her immediately. The Mandalorian, often called “Mando” by the other characters he meets, protects The Child in a quirky, loveable relationship. Since The Child’s appearance on Disney +, a Baby Fever has taken hold of the Internet.

On the Latino Internet, it’s more like Papi Mando taking care of Yodito with all the ways our parents took care of us.

CREDIT: @LATINXGEEKS / TWITTER

On Latino Twitter, Mando takes care of Baby Yoda with the age-old panacea of VapoRub and that magical poem that almost always ended in a tickle fight: “Sana, sana, colita de rana…” The fact that the English-speaking world is calling The Mandalorian “Mando,” has people like Aaron Duran pointing out via Twitter that “Mando = Armando and he is clearly a space tío. Yodito shall be canon. This is the way.” Other people are asking, “Is it Yodito or Yodita? I don’t want to assume the babies’ gender.” To clarify, Yodito is already 50 years old, but simply has the appearance of a baby. 

All we know is that we agree with @LatinGeeks: “Baby Yodito is truly one of us.”

CREDIT: @LATINXGEEKS / TWITTER

Tío Mando is letting Yodito learn his own lessons and letting him try Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. It’s what all our tíos told us when we wanted to try a sip of their Patron, also. “El Mando y Yodito is my favorite novela,” tweeted Latinx Geeks. 

Just yesterday, Julián Castro tweeted a photo of Yodito sipping Lipton tea alongside some political tea: “If the Democratic Party wants a field that’s representative of its members and its voters, it probably shouldn’t have two states as white as Iowa and New Hampshire vote first every year,” Castro retweeted Nate Silver. In fact, Yodito is trending even higher than most 2020 Democratic presidential candidates, according to Axios.

Yup, Yodito has their own extremely miniature esclava.

CREDIT: @LATINXGEEKS / TWITTER

Yeah, but when is Mando piercing Yodito’s ears? It’s long overdue,” Enrique Rea asked. Another Yodito fan posited that Yodito probably smells like that Royal Violets cheap perfume our mamis subjected us to as infants. As the Internet began asking what Baby Yoda’s first word will be, Latino Internet definitively answered. Yodito’s first world will be “Papi.” *cries*

Yodito is also probably “gay as hell.”

CREDIT: @LATINXGEEKS / TWITTER

*sips tea* I feel so seen. Thank you @LatinxGeeks for making Yodito uniquely belonging to Latinos. We think that J.Lo needs to meet Yodito to move past her mere like-dom for Baby Yoda. Yodito is the most loveable muñeco lindo on the Internet right now.

READ: Disney Finally Gave Us A Trailer Of Pedro Pascal As A Bounty Hunter In ‘Star Wars’ Series ‘The Mandalorian’

Here Are 8 Latino Christmas Movies You Should Watch To Get Into The Festive Season

Entertainment

Here Are 8 Latino Christmas Movies You Should Watch To Get Into The Festive Season

Crown Media

This Christmas, when you’re getting comfy on the couch, ready to turn on the TV and watch a Holiday film, one thing is certain: we all know what the leads will look like. It’s safe to assume that the actors of most Christmas movies are white. 

Christmas and the whole holiday season is an important time of year for Latinos, traditionally and culturally, so it’s exciting to see Latinos on screen portraying our seasonal conflicts, rituals and family dynamics whenever the opportunity arises —which is not very often tbh.

When it comes to African American and Asian romantic leads in Hallmark holiday movies, the number is zero.

According to the numbers. By the end of 2017, Hallmark premiered a combined 86 new movies on two of its networks, Hallmark Channel and Hallmark Movies & Mysteries. Only six of those movies had non-white romantic leads. That same year, Hallmark debuted three films with Catherine Bell (“Good Witch: Spellbound,” “Home for Christmas Day” and “Christmas in the Air”), who is half Iranian; one movie with Julie Gonzalo (“Falling for Vermont”), who’s from Argentina; and two movies with Alexa PenaVega (“Destination Wedding”), one of which also starred her husband Carlos PenaVega (“Enchanted Christmas”), both of whom are Hispanic.

While there obviously needs to be more seasonal films where Latinos take the lead, there are a number of films that Latinxs can watch to see themselves represented on screen. Keep scrolling to read all about them, here are some of our faves. 

Christmas Bounty

Starring Francia Raisa, this film is all about a bounty hunter-turned-elementary shool teacher who tries to keep her past a secret. Shenanigans follow as Raisa’s character reluctantly returns home for the holiday season. 

Nothing Like The Holidays

Credit: deswest_mac / Instagram

The dysfunctional Puerto Rican Rodriguez family reunite and fight for the first time in years in Alfredo De Villa’s Nothing Like the Holidays.  John Leguizamo, Freddy Rodriguez, Elizabeth Peña, Luis Guzmán, Jay Hernandez and Melonie Diaz appear as the Rodriguezs, gathering for Christmas in their family home in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood. 

¡Feliz Christmas, Merry Navidad!

Spanish-language ¡Feliz Christmas, Merry Navidad! directed by Luis Palomo, stars Tere López-Tarín, Carlos Soriano, and Angelina Cruz. The family-friendly magical-realistic holiday film tells the tale of three children who overcome differences in the interest of friendship.  The inspiration Christmas movie exposes the true meaning of Christmas, and the value of interpersonal relationships and family.

El Camino Christmas

Credit: kambizshayanfard / Instagram

Starring Jessica Alba and Emilio Rivera —better known for his role on Sons of Anarchy—this comedy will make you LOL. The story of a man who’s in search for his father and then gets stuck in a liquor store on Christmas eve, has at least a little bit of diversity in it, so why not give it a go?

This Christmas 

Laz Alonso and Lupe Ontiveros star in the African American holiday comedy-drama This Christmas, a film about the Whitfield family. The estranged family gathers under the same roof for the first time in seven years, and the attempt to rekindle broken relationships.

A Very Harold And Kumar Christmas 

This is one of the most diverse Christmas movies out there. It includes a few Latinx stars in it —Danny Trejo and the Colombian-American actress Paula Garces. The movie is about Kumar and Harold’s holiday adventures and, let’s just say there’s lots of cannabis involved. 

Esta Navidad

The 1959 film is somewhat of a cult classic. Directed by Rene Cardoso, the Mexican film is about the Devil’s evil plan to kill Santa Claus. The surreal film is set in Santa’s cloud castle as well as in Mexico City. It’s not a traditional film, but definitely worth seeing. 

Holiday in Handcuffs

Mario Lopez and Melissa Joan Hart star in Holiday in Handcuffs, a holiday film about a miserable and lonely waitress and aspiring painter who kidnaps a customer from her job, so that she can introduce him to her family as her boyfriend. Mario Lopez plays the kidnapped fake boyfriend —and I mean, if I had the chance to kidnap Mario Lopez, you best believe I would.