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Saca Tu Bandera: Which Side of these Latino Food Rivalries are You On?

alimentosdemitierra.com

¡Ya se armo! Latinos are always up for a good fight. Our food rivalries are the stuff of legend, so much so, that if you claim a dish is better than another, THINGS WILL GET HEATED. Here are some of the fiercest rivalries:

1. Arepas – Colombia vs. Venezuela

Venezuelan Arepa

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Photo Credit: De Pabellón/flickr

The gloves are off! Let’s start with the classic Latin American food duel: arepas. Colombians and Venezuelans are friendly foes when it comes to this masarepa dough creation, and each country swears its version is THE BEST.

Venezuelan arepas are typically thicker than Colombian arepas. They’re usually split down the middle and stuffed with drool-worthy fillings such as pulled pork, chicken or cheese.

Colombian Arepas

Photo Credit: http://alimentosdemitierra.com

Colombian arepas are thinner and are more likely to be stuffed (or topped) with butter and cheese. But you can also find Colombian arepas topped with ingredients like avocados, eggs and cheese.

2. Argentine Asado vs. Mexican Carne Asada

Asado

What is an ego? The little Argentine we all have inside of us. Jaja, JUST KIDDING.? Well, don’t blame los Argentinos for fluffing their feathers after chowing down at an asado, a.k.a. a barbecue.

Argentines think the best soccer player in the world is Messi. Makes sense. But they equally believe the best meat comes from Argentina – due to the specific cuts of beef they like to use. No cuts of cabeza here.

Carne Asada

3. Pisco – Chile vs. Peru

Pisco Sour
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Photo Credit: Thomas S./flickr

Peruvians and Chileans give each other the side-eye on who has the better pisco, a brandy made by distilling grape wine into a spirit. The two neighbors will debate endlessly on which country produced it first, up to the etymology of the word. The competition is so fierce, it is illegal to import pisco from Chile to Peru. #NoChillZone

Peruvians are also extremely strict about not diluting the pisco, while Chileans lean towards a more modern approach to the process – aging pisco in wood barrels or mixing it with distilled water. Chileans also mix it with Coke or Sprite.

Piscola 

What each country can agree about? You’ll never meet a pisco happy hour you don’t like! Order up Peru’s adopted national drink, a pisco sour, next time it hits 5:00 p.m.

4. Wine – Chile vs. Argentina

Argentine Wine

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✨Elaborado con uvas #pinotnoir y #chardonnay, este magnífico ejemplar de @bodegaslopez Montchenot Brut Nature Rosé es #Fresco, #elegante y #floral 🥂💘🍾 . 🍷Iniciada en 1898, Bodegas Lopez es una de las bodegas mas conocidas y prestigiadas en la Argentina 🇦🇷 Has probado sus vinos? . . . ✨ Enchanted with this wine and its pink sparkles 💖 Made with #pinotnoir and #chardonnay grapes, this magnificent sparkling wine from @bodegaslopez Montchenot Brut Nature Rosé is #Fresh, #elegant and #floral 🥂💘🍾 . 🍷 Founded in 1898, Bodegas Lopez is one of the most well-known and prestigious vineyards in Argentina 🇦🇷 Have you tasted their wines? . . #bodegalopez #mendoza #argentina #champan #rose #roseallday #montchenot #argentinewines #vino #vinho #vin #wine #vinhoargentino #vinoargentino #argentinianwine #throwback

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However, Chile is becoming a strong contender with its over 70 wineries, with some wine aficionados flocking to its vineyards due to the comparable weather cross between France and California.

5. Mojitos vs. Caipirinhas

Mojito

Muddle, muddle, muddle, yea! Mr. Worldwide Pitbull sings about not wanting agua and downing a bebida instead. We can’t blame him, and while we’re willing to bet he is talking about mojitos due to his Cuban heritage.

Capirinha

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#caipirinha 🍻. @aline_meunier #aperotherapie

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6. Pupusas vs. Gorditas

Pupusas

Don’t get it twisted. While these two dishes might look similar, Mexicans and Salvadorans make sure to accentuate the differences between these two long-lost cousins of the arepas. Pupusas are made with corn dough and topped with curtido and salsa.

Gorditas 

Mexican gorditas are usually split. Sometimes they’re just stuffed with butter, other times they are stuffed with chicken, carne al pastor, and other fillings.

7. Ceviche – Peru vs. Ecuador

Peruvian Ceviche

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#cevicheperu

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Photo Credit: @david_peruvianfood/ Instagram

Oh, we are stirring the pot on this one. Peruvians love their ceviche so much, there is even a holiday dedicated to it (June 28, amigos)! This Anthony Bourdain-approved dish is served with marinated fish under a bed of purple onions.

Ecuadorian Ceviche

Photo Credit: @losmesegares_restaurante/ Instagram

Ecuador’s ceviche doesn’t have a holiday dedicated to it, but it sure looks tasty enough to call in sick from work and just grub on this shrimp, lemon and tomato sauce concoction.

Which food duel is your favorite? Which dish is your winner? Mitú wants to know. Leave a comment below.

This Argentine Doctor Saved Millions Of Lives With A Groundbreaking Surgery And Now He Has His Own Google Doodle

Culture

This Argentine Doctor Saved Millions Of Lives With A Groundbreaking Surgery And Now He Has His Own Google Doodle

Google

Google has become well known for it’s regularly tributed to some of the most famed people in history. Unsurprisingly, Latinos make up a massive bundle of Google’s over 900 doodles.

And today, Google is honoring an Argentine doctor who contributed one of the most commonly used medical procedures to the world – saving millions of lives in the process.

The legacy of Argentine surgeon Rene Favaloro is being remembered by a Google Doodle today on what would have been his 96th birthday.

Credit: @CleClinicNews / Twitter

René Favaloro, a pioneering Argentine heart surgeon, is being remembered with a Google Doodle for his contributions to coronary bypass surgery on what would have been his 96th birthday.

Born in La Plata, Argentina, in 1923, Favaloro started his career as a doctor in the farming community of Jacinto Arauz, where he built his own operating room, trained nurses and set up a local blood bank.

In 1962 he moved to the United States where he pioneered coronary bypass surgery, a technique used to restore blood flow to the heart when the vessel supplying it is blocked.

René Favaloro was a pioneer in cardiac surgery and his discovery has saved countless lives.

Credit: @American_Heart / Twitter

Favaloro developed a method using a vein from the leg, implanting it to bypass the blockage in the coronary artery. He performed the first operation of this kind on a 51 year-old woman at the Cleveland Clinic in 1967. The historic operation was a success and the procedure has saved countless lives since then.

Today, coronary artery bypass surgery is one of the most common operations. Doctors performed 213,700 in the U.S. in 2011.

But who was René Favaloro?

Credit: @newscientist / Twitter

Rene Favaloro was born in 1923 in La Plata, Argentina and went on to earn a degree in medicine from the National University of La Plata in 1948.

He worked as a doctor in his home country for a time before moving to the US to study thoracic and cardiovascular surgery at the Cleveland Clinic

Favaloro returned to Argentina in 1972, where he would later found his own medical institution, the Favaloro Foundation.

While Favaloro himself was reluctant to be known as the “father” of coronary bypass surgery, his work played a fundamental role in introducing the procedure into the clinical arena.

Of his legacy, Favaloro wrote: “’We’ is more important than ‘I.’ In medicine, the advances are always the result of many efforts accumulated over the years.”

Today, the Favaloro Foundation serves patients based on their medical needs rather than their ability to pay and tecaches Dr Favaloro’s innovative techniques to doctors all over Latin America.

Sadly, his clinic pushed him into debt and he took his own life in 2000.

Credit: @Bravp_MD / Twitter

He took his own life on July 29, 2000 at the age of 77. The day before his death he sent a letter to then-Argentine President Fernando de la Rúa (who died three days ago) asking him for help to secure funding for his foundation, which had become mired in debt as a result of a national economic crisis.

Many took to Twitter to share in their Argentine pride.

Credit: @CleClinicNews / Twitter

Many were excited to see such an important Argentine figure getting global recognition for this contributions to the world.

While other doctors expressed how much they owe to Dr. Favaloro.

Credit: @TIME / Twitter

Without the work of Dr. Favaloro, many doctors pointed out that we could be living in a world where there are a lot more preventable deaths because of heart disease.

READ: 25 Times Latinos Have Graced The Google Doodle

Some People Think Brazil Rigged Copa America In Their Favor Since They Were The Host Nation

Entertainment

Some People Think Brazil Rigged Copa America In Their Favor Since They Were The Host Nation

lucasfigfoto / cbf_futebol / Instagram

For the first time since 2007, Brazil has won the ultimate South American soccer tournament, Copa America. Brazil played against Peru in their home Maracaña stadium on Sunday, July 7 with a solid 3-1 victory. That small fact means something even bigger for Brazil. The country’s team has won the title every single time it has hosted the tournament. While some folks think that the tournament is rigged in Brazil’s favor, there were quite a few factors that were not in the winning team’s favor.

Neymar, arguably Brazil’s best player, had to sit out of the game due to an ankle injury.

Credit: naymarjr / Instagram

Neymar and his son sat very close to President Jair Bolsonaro, albeit on the sidelines. Fans have remarked on how upset Neymar looks to be benched. He had ruptured a ligament in his ankle just days before the game in a friendly match against Qatar last week.

Forward Gabriel Jesus, who scored for Brazil, was sent to the bench after a foul.

Credit: dejesusoficial / Instagram

With 20 minutes left in the game, Gabriel Jesus was sent to the bench for his second yellow card. That means that Brazil had ten players to Peru’s eleven, and still beat them.

“Brazil deserved the victory,” Peru coach Ricardo Gareca said.

Credit: lucasfigfoto / cbf_futebol / Instagram

“We played better than we did in the previous match. We have improved as a team,” an encouraged Gareca told reporters. “We still have to improve more, but we are on the right track.”

Neymar’s replacement, Everton, was named player of the final.

Credit: lucasfigfoto / cbf_futebol / Instagram

“I gave everything I had today,” said Everton. Nobody, not even coach Tite, could have imagined that Everton would even be playing in the final, let alone carry the team. You’ll see his head in the bottom left corner of the image above.

Argentina’s Lionel Messi publicly called the Copa América referees “corrupt.”

Credit: leomessi / Instagram

After a bizarre red card against Messi during the third-place playoff against Chile Saturday, he told reporters, “I feel a lot of anger because I think I did not deserve that red card because I think we were playing a very good game. We were ahead, but, as I said recently, unfortunately, there is a lot of corruption, the referees. We leave with the feeling that they did not allow us to be in the final, that we were ready for better.” 

Defensive midfielder, Carlos Henrique Casemiro, had a classy response to Messi’s comments.

Credit: casemiro / Instagram

This Twitter user is throwing shade back at Messi for his comments. “Those with a mouth can say what they want. It’s not up to me to speak, it’s a delicate subject,” the soccer player told reporters. “It’s not for me to say if the refereeing was good. We need to congratulate Peru for the good Copa America they had.”

While Brazil is celebrating a victory, they’re also commemorating a historic loss against Germany.

Credit: @anapgeller / Twitter

Known on The Internet as #7x1Day, on July 8th, 2014, Brazil lost the FIFA World Cup to Germany in a disgraceful 7-1 loss. Germany scored four goals within the first six minutes of the game, and it got worse from there. At the last minute, Brazil scored a consolation goal but ultimately lost big. That game marked the end of a 62-match home unbeaten streak going back to the 1975 Copa América when they lost to Peru.

Of course, the Internet is doing its thing.

Credit: @TrollFootball / Twitter

Obviously, @TrollFootball is trolling us all with this screen grab from that infamous Germany-Brazil game. Latinos definitely came out to call BS on this claim. At the time, Germany’s jerseys looked pretty similar to Peru’s and have enjoyed a redesign.

Even Jesus is wearing a Brazil jersey now.

Credit: @BleacherReport / Twitter

And also, apparently, holding a gleaming trophy that’s shining brighter than Jesus himself! They say we create a God of our own understanding. This is how Rio’s God is looking–freshly outfitted and winning.

Felicidades a Brasil!!! 🇧🇷

Credit: @BiaFuracaoReal / Twitter

Brazil’s streets were flooded with fans after the victory, and we don’t think they’ve stopped partying since Sunday. Enjoy it!

READ: Brazil’s Soccer Reina Marta Trumps Germany’s Miroslav Klose For All-Time World Cup Scoring Record

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