#mitúWORLD

This Latino Kicker Is So Good, An NFL Team Made An Unusual Move Just To Get Him

Meet Roberto Aguayo. He’s the dude in the middle. In case you’re wondering why he’s flanked by two big football players…

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

It’s because they’re teammates. Well, they were teammates. For the past three years, Aguayo was a kicker for Florida State University.

Last year's success is today's expectation.

A photo posted by Roberto Aguayo (@robertoaguayo) on

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

And he was just drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the second round of the 2016 NFL draft.

Welcome to Tampa Bay, Roberto Aguayo! #BucsDraft #SiegetheDay #BOOM

A photo posted by Tampa Bay Buccaneers (@tbbuccaneers) on

Credit: @tbbuccaneers / Instagram

Most NFL teams don’t draft kickers in the second round. But Aguayo was too good to pass up.

How good was he in college?

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

REALLY GOOD. Over his career, Aguayo was perfect (49 out of 49) for field goals inside 40 yards. Oh, and he also made all 198 of his extra point kicks.

Credit: @PROcast / Twitter

Basically, Aguayo is the most accurate kicker in college football history.

He’s pretty good at paper football, too.

Credit: ACC Digital Network / YouTube

That’s Aguayo having a little fun with ACC Digital Network reporter Jeff Fischel, who challenged the young kicker to a game of paper football. Aguayo’s first “kick” was straight up the middle and hit Fischel between his eyes. How’s that for aim?

Aguayo credits his father, an immigrant from Mexico, for helping him become a beast at kicking.

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

Aguayo, who excelled at soccer and football, says his father built an H-shaped goal in their backyard that served as both a soccer goal and a football goal post. Once Aguayo decided to focus strictly on football, he was able to practice his kicking at home.

The 21-year-old kicker cites his father’s work ethic as an inspiration.

Throwback to my early goon days! Mean muggin since day one lol

A photo posted by Roberto Aguayo (@robertoaguayo) on

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

Aguayo’s father grew up on a ranch near Leon, Guanajuato, in Mexico and decided to move to the U.S. when he was 18. He eventually settled in Florida. His goal, like many immigrants, was to make enough money to support himself and send money back to his family.

Although his father put in long hours at a tree farm, Aguayo told ESPN that his father still made time for him on days off: “I just wanted to hang by the pool with my friends, but he’d wake us up early, at 6 o’clock. He’s out in the sun all day [at work], so I’m surprised he had the energy, and that motivated me. When people ask me how I have such a strong leg and this ability, I go back to those days.”

Aguayo also told Sports Illustrated he respects his father for making tough sacrifices.

La Familia has arrived in Cali, getting closer and closer to the biggest game of my career!

A photo posted by Roberto Aguayo (@robertoaguayo) on

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

“He came over illegally, and there are a lot of people who do that, but they do that for a better life. There was no money over there. My uncle [living in Mexico] will work and make about $10 a day, and that’s not enough to support the family. My dad wanted to have something better for my family.”

Soon, Aguayo will be reunited with former FSU teammate Jameis Winston, who is the starting quarterback for Tampa Bay.

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

What will Florida State do to replace their star kicker? They’ve already recruited Roberto’s younger brother, Ricky.

Credit: @FSU_Football / Twitter

READ: Meet The 21-Year-Old Pitcher From Mexico Who Is Already Becoming A Baseball Star

Are you inspired by Aguayo’s success story? Click on the share button below to send to your friends!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Entertainment

All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Netflix continues to churn out powerful films in countries around the world and their latest venture, a look into the life of Brazilian footballer Pelé is another hit. Sure, Pelé may be considered the world’s best soccer player ever but his place in Brazilian history is less clear – at least according to the new doc.

Filmmakers David Tryhorn and Ben Nicholas spent hours in Pelé’s company interviewing him on everything from a childhood spent in poverty to his numerous affairs and his controversial relationship with the authoritarian regime that ruled Brazil during his playing career. Here are some of the key takeaways from this must watch documentary.

Pelé was criticized for not taking a political stance during Brazil’s authoritarian regime.

In 1964, the Brazilian military staged a coup, which led to a dictatorship being established in the country that lasted until 1985. The military government relied on torture and repression to maintain power.

In the film, Pelé is asked whether he knew about these practices at the time.

“If I were to say now that I had never been aware of it, that would be a lie,” he says. “There was a lot we never got to find out, but there were many stories too.”

However, the film paints him as taking a neutral stance throughout, never criticising the regime. Former team-mate Paulo Cezar Lima – aka Caju – doesn’t forgive him.

“I love Pele but that won’t stop me criticizing him. I thought his behavior was that of a black man who says ‘yes sir’,” said Caju. “A submissive black man. It’s a criticism I hold against him until this day, because just one statement from Pelé would have gone a long way.”

The government may have interfered with the Brazilian team.

A dejected Pele leaves the field at Goodison Park after being beaten 3-1 by Portugal, 1966.

The film paints a picture of how national team’s exploits were used to launder the reputation of the military regime during the 1960s. Before the 1970 World Cup, a journalist and friend of Pelé’s describes how it became very important for the regime’s international image that Brazil win the World Cup again. And that meant Pele had to play.

“Winning the World Cup became a governmental matter,” Kfouri says. “The team staff were almost entirely made up of military personnel.”

Manager Joao Saldanha appears to have been fired in the lead-up to the 1970 World Cup for criticizing the Brazilian president, telling a reporter: “I don’t pick his ministers and he doesn’t pick my team. That way we understand each other well.”

Pelé wanted to quit after the 1966 World Cup.

Credit: Pelé / Netflix

In the 1966 World Cup, Brazil was considered a favorite to win, having won the competition four years earlier in Chile. However, there was a massive shock when they were knocked out in the group stages.

“Getting knocked out of the World Cup in England was the saddest moment of my life,” Pelé says. In the film, he tells a reporter: “I don’t intend to play in any more World Cups, because I’m not lucky in them. This is the second World Cup where I have been injured after only two games.”

He played one more World Cup – the 1970 tournament in Mexico, which Brazil won. He’s still the only player to have won three World Cup trophies.

And he admits it was hard for him to stay faithful.

Stores of Pelé’s alleged infidelities and wild romances were common in the tabloids. By 1958, he was a global icon and football’s first millionaire while still only a teenager. And his fans followed him everywhere so it’s hardly a secret that Pelé did not show the same faithfulness to everyone in his life as he did to his club Santos.

At one point in the film, a journalist asks Pelé whether he found it difficult to remain faithful with the amount of women flirting with him.

“In all honesty, it was,” he says, “I’ve had a few affairs, some of which resulted in children, but I only learned about them later. My first wife knew all about it, I never lied to anyone.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Mariah Carey Perfectly Shades the NFL By Calling Super Bowl Sunday ‘Colin Kaepernick Appreciation Day’

Entertainment

Mariah Carey Perfectly Shades the NFL By Calling Super Bowl Sunday ‘Colin Kaepernick Appreciation Day’

Credit: mariahcarey/Instagram

Mariah Carey continues to show us that it’s her world and we’re just living in it. The Songbird Supreme has never been shy about standing up for what she believes in, now matter how salty her critics can get.

On Sunday, when the rest of America was glued to their TV screens watching the Super Bowl, Mariah Carey tweeted out: “Happy Colin Kaepernick Appreciation Day!”

Man interpreted the tweet as shade directed at the NFL for airing a seemingly anti-racism commercial that simultaneously revealed that the organization would be committing $250 million to ending systematic racism.

The commercial consisted of an inspirational speech being played over footage of Black Lives Matter protests.

“Football is a microcosm of America. All races, religions, living, playing, competing, side by side,” said the commercial.

Many viewers pegged the ad and announcement as tone-deaf, considering the NFL’s containing failure to support Colin Kaepernick’s (and now other Black football players’) protests against police brutality.

“Just saw a commercial that the NFL is committing $250 Million to end systemic racism yet they can’t even commit a couple million to get Colin Kaepernick signed to a team…” wrote one skeptical Twitter user.

“The NFL creating a commercial that shows players kneeling, putting “Breonna Taylor” on the back of their helmets, and ends with the league committing $250 million to end systemic racism must have @Kaepernick7 feeling some type of way,” wrote another.

This isn’t the first time Mariah has publicly showed her support for the former quarterback for the 49ers.

In 2018, Carey posted a picture on her Instagram of herself and Kaepernick together in a photo-op that (most of) her fans were going crazy over. She captioned the picture: “Such an honor to meet @kaepernick7 today!”

Carey, who is of Afro-Venezuelan descent, has always been frank about her support of racial equality and the end to police violence. She notably postponed the release of her 30th anniversary album to not detract attention from the BLM movement.

“As we continue to fight for equality and justice within our broken systems, I thank you for using your platforms to educate, inform and invoke change. Together let’s bring on a change,” she wrote on her Instagram.

While she was at it, Mariah also used her Twitter account to bring attention to another grave injustice that took place at a previous Super Bowl: the blackballing of Janet Jackson.

When one fan replied to her “Colin Kapppp appreciation thread” with the tweet, “Don’t forget it’s also Janet Jackson appreciation day,” she responded with a sly: “Yes it is! *Heart emoji*”

Sigh. No one is able to shade like the Queen.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com