Entertainment

This Latino Kicker Is So Good, An NFL Team Made An Unusual Move Just To Get Him

Meet Roberto Aguayo. He’s the dude in the middle. In case you’re wondering why he’s flanked by two big football players…

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

It’s because they’re teammates. Well, they were teammates. For the past three years, Aguayo was a kicker for Florida State University.

Last year's success is today's expectation.

A photo posted by Roberto Aguayo (@robertoaguayo) on

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

And he was just drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the second round of the 2016 NFL draft.

Welcome to Tampa Bay, Roberto Aguayo! #BucsDraft #SiegetheDay #BOOM

A photo posted by Tampa Bay Buccaneers (@tbbuccaneers) on

Credit: @tbbuccaneers / Instagram

Most NFL teams don’t draft kickers in the second round. But Aguayo was too good to pass up.

How good was he in college?

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

REALLY GOOD. Over his career, Aguayo was perfect (49 out of 49) for field goals inside 40 yards. Oh, and he also made all 198 of his extra point kicks.

Credit: @PROcast / Twitter

Basically, Aguayo is the most accurate kicker in college football history.

He’s pretty good at paper football, too.

aguayo-paper-football
Credit: ACC Digital Network / YouTube

That’s Aguayo having a little fun with ACC Digital Network reporter Jeff Fischel, who challenged the young kicker to a game of paper football. Aguayo’s first “kick” was straight up the middle and hit Fischel between his eyes. How’s that for aim?

Aguayo credits his father, an immigrant from Mexico, for helping him become a beast at kicking.

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

Aguayo, who excelled at soccer and football, says his father built an H-shaped goal in their backyard that served as both a soccer goal and a football goal post. Once Aguayo decided to focus strictly on football, he was able to practice his kicking at home.

The 21-year-old kicker cites his father’s work ethic as an inspiration.

Throwback to my early goon days! Mean muggin since day one lol

A photo posted by Roberto Aguayo (@robertoaguayo) on

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

Aguayo’s father grew up on a ranch near Leon, Guanajuato, in Mexico and decided to move to the U.S. when he was 18. He eventually settled in Florida. His goal, like many immigrants, was to make enough money to support himself and send money back to his family.

Although his father put in long hours at a tree farm, Aguayo told ESPN that his father still made time for him on days off: “I just wanted to hang by the pool with my friends, but he’d wake us up early, at 6 o’clock. He’s out in the sun all day [at work], so I’m surprised he had the energy, and that motivated me. When people ask me how I have such a strong leg and this ability, I go back to those days.”

Aguayo also told Sports Illustrated he respects his father for making tough sacrifices.

La Familia has arrived in Cali, getting closer and closer to the biggest game of my career!

A photo posted by Roberto Aguayo (@robertoaguayo) on

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

“He came over illegally, and there are a lot of people who do that, but they do that for a better life. There was no money over there. My uncle [living in Mexico] will work and make about $10 a day, and that’s not enough to support the family. My dad wanted to have something better for my family.”

Soon, Aguayo will be reunited with former FSU teammate Jameis Winston, who is the starting quarterback for Tampa Bay.

Credit: @robertoaguayo / Instagram

What will Florida State do to replace their star kicker? They’ve already recruited Roberto’s younger brother, Ricky.

Credit: @FSU_Football / Twitter

READ: Meet The 21-Year-Old Pitcher From Mexico Who Is Already Becoming A Baseball Star

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New Trailer Released For The 3-Part Aaron Hernandez Documentary Coming To Netflix

Entertainment

New Trailer Released For The 3-Part Aaron Hernandez Documentary Coming To Netflix

Netflix / YouTube

If we’re learned anything from the powerful documentaries of late (Surviving R. Kelly, Leaving Neverland, etc.) is that our perceived notions of what we thought was the whole story were nothing compared to the truth. In other words, these hard-hitting documentaries explore a person or topic with a deeper lens, which in turn opens the door wide open to a full new understanding. This latest documentary is showing that we only knew a portion of the truth. 

“Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez” is a new documentary on Netflix that will be premiering on Jan. 15.

Credit: Netflix/ YouTube

The 3-part series looks into the story of the former NFL player who reportedly committed suicide inside his prison cell in 2017. If the documentary is anything like the trailer, we’re in for a crazy ride — and not the right kind, but the ones that leave you bewildered. 

While the public has some perspective on the situation that landed Hernandez in jail, the show goes in deeper into his childhood, family, and life before he became a superstar athlete. 

The series takes a look at the making of the NFL pro and how Hernandez was propelled from high school football player to a multi-million dollar contract. 

Credit: Netflix / YouTube

It’s a fascinating look to see how this charming young kid turned out to be a killer. If we have learned from any other True Crime stories is that a killer isn’t just a sociopath, sometimes this killer tendencies develope over time, and we never know what was at the root of their issues. 

With Hernandez, we learn through this series that his family had a lot to do with how his life would play out later.

Credit: Netflix / YouTube

The trailer includes conversations that he had over the phone with his mother, including one in which he tells her that there was no way he would ever turn out to be an angel, especially because she was never there for him. 

The show will also include the turbulent relationship he had with his abusive father. An investigative report in Spotlight inside the Boston Globe released in 2018 added detailed accounts of how Hernandez suffered at the hands of his father. 

“Aaron and his older brother were often beaten and brutalized by their dad,” the Boston Globe reports. “Aaron didn’t cry at his father’s funeral, and people took note. He kept it all inside.” His brother said that they both lived in “constant fear of their father’s beatings.” 

Hernandez and his mother also had a very tumultuous relationship. It seemed as if football was his only way out of that chaotic family life. His high school friends recall him as a kind person, amusing, and said he didn’t pick on other kids. 

When the Patriots gave him a $40 million contract, Hernandez’s life just got more out of control. 

Credit: Netflix / YouTube

The trailer shows that all the suffering he went through at home, combined with superstardom, the pressures of delivering for the Patriots, “made him a ticking time bomb.” Not only did Hernandez get into a life of alcohol, drugs, and weapons, and as a witness in his trial said, “it was like he was out to prove something.” 

In 2015, Hernandez was charged for the murder of Odin Lloyd, a former football player who was dating the sister of Hernandez’s fiancee, Shayanna Jenkins. Hernandez was let go from the team even though he told his coach he had nothing to do with the murder. As the documentary shows, he was able to play a successful season with the Patriots even though he had killed someone. 

The trailer also explores one of the most interesting aspects of the life of Hernandez, which concerned his mental health caused by CTE.

Credit: Netflix / YouTube

The documentary shows how Hernandez went from being a fun-loving yet troubled kid to an angry adult that would get violent at the drop of a dime. That kind of drastic change, including his suicide, is speculated to have been a result of his diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is caused after a person receives multiple blows to the head. It’s been highly reported that, more often than not, NFL players have been diagnosed with CTE. The unfortunate aspect of this illness is that people cannot be diagnosed until they are dead. That is when their brains can be studied. 

The symptoms of CTE include memory loss, confusion, impaired judgment, impulse control problems, aggression, depression, anxiety, suicidality, parkinsonism, and, eventually, progressive dementia.  Hernandez clearly showed many of these symptoms, including his eventual suicide in 2017. 

Check out the trailer below. 

READ: After Aaron Hernandez’s Brain Was Donated For CTE Research, It Was Found That He Had The Worst Case Of CTE For Someone His Age

Activists Interrupt Harvard-Yale Football Game To Protest Climate Change And Cancel Puerto Rico Debt Holdings

Things That Matter

Activists Interrupt Harvard-Yale Football Game To Protest Climate Change And Cancel Puerto Rico Debt Holdings

extinctionrebellion / Instagram

The Harvard-Yale football game was delayed during halftime on Saturday after more than 150 students and alumni took to the field to protest against the schools’ endowments from fossil fuel companies and Puerto Rican debt. The scene was captured across social media as videos were shared of students unfurling banners that read “Nobody wins. Yale & Harvard are complicit in climate injustice,” among others signs.

The annual football game between both Ivy League schools was delayed for almost an hour as police demanded over speakers that protesters leave the field. In videos, you can hear protesters chanting “disclose, divest and reinvest,” as more fans from the stands joined protesters on the field. The end result was 42 people being charged with disorderly conduct, protest organizers had initially said that 20 to 30 protesters were arrested.

“Students are tired of Harvard and Yale profiting off of climate destruction and neocolonial investments in Puerto Rico’s debt,” a statement by student group Divest Harvard read. “It’s time for more than lip service and greenwashing from academic leaders. Harvard and Yale must address the climate emergency at the scale and with the urgency it demands. This action is only the beginning.”

The reason behind the protest was to speak up against the schools to divest from fossil fuels and cancel their Puerto Rico debt holdings, among other issues. 

While there was some initial confusion behind the reasoning of students taking the field, the message was clear that there was anger at both Yale and Harvard financial dealings. According to Vox, both of the schools “rely on funds, bonds, and assorted financial instruments to keep their endowments strong”. Many students and alumni are looking at the schools profiting from the ongoing climate crisis and want them to divest their endowments from fossil fuel holdings and to cancel any debt from Puerto Rico.

“Harvard and Yale claim their goal is to create student leaders who can strive toward a more ‘just, fair, and promising world’ by ‘improving the world today and for future generations.’ Yet by continuing to invest in industries that mislead the public, smear academics, and deny reality, Harvard and Yale are complicit in tearing down that future,” the student groups, Fossil Fuel Divest Harvard, Fossil Free Yale and Yale Endowment Justice Coalition, said in a statement following Saturday’s protest.

This has been a growing movement on college campuses across the country that has peaked as environmental issues have come to the forefront of various institutions. Back in September, activists celebrated a victory at the University of California system said that it would move away from investing from fossil fuels.

For Harvard senior Caleb Schwartz, who was one of the various protest organizers that were arrested on Saturday, told NPR about the events that unfolded on the field. “That moment, when we saw people running onto the field was just really incredible,” Schwartz said. “I saw organizers around me crying because it was such a beautiful moment.

Yale responded to Saturday’s protest saying that while the school supports freedom of expression, it shouldn’t come at the cost of delaying a sporting event.

Yale released a statement shortly after the game that the school “stands firmly for the right to free expression” but just not as the cost of this football game.

“It is regrettable,” a statement released by Yale read, “that the orchestrated protest came during a time when fellow students were participating in a collegiate career-defining contest and an annual tradition when thousands gather from around the world to enjoy and celebrate the storied traditions of both football programs and universities.”

The protest received support from various politicians who supported the activists’ cause and freedom and expression.

One of those who supported Saturday’s protest was Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., who tweeted “Activism disrupts the present to change the future.

Former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro also took to Twitter to shoutout the activists and said that he was impressed by the students’ efforts. “From the March for Our Lives, to worldwide Climate Strikes, students and young people are leading the charge to protect their futures,” Castro wrote. “I’m inspired by their efforts to hold their universities to a higher standard.”

There is no doubt that this protest has put these issues at the forefront of many people’s minds, especially at other fellow colleges. Don’t be surprised if this isn’t the last sporting event that gets disrupted to send the powerful message of climate change. 

READ: A Photo Of This Sad, Sweet Old Lady Went Viral Because She Hadn’t Sold Any Of Her Handmade Napkins, Now They’re All Sold