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Mexican Gangster Actor Used To Run The Streets, Now He’s An Actor

Richard Cabral’s life story of reformed gang member turned Hollywood star is so remarkable and rare that if you saw it in a movie you’d be like,”Come on, that sh*t ain’t real.” But it’s for real. He went from nearly spending his life in jail for trying to kill a man to earning an Emmy nomination for his work on a critically-acclaimed TV drama. Make no mistake, his success didn’t come by chance, it came by choice.

Cabral’s story starts in East L.A., where he was born to a single mother in the early ’80s.

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As a teenager, Cabral looked to gangs for a sense of belonging.

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Like many young people who get caught up in gang life, Cabral spent his most of his teenage years in and out of jail.

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At 20 years old, he shot a man for no good reason.

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The day before Cabral was supposed to go to trial for attempted murder, he accepted a plea deal.

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He served 27 months in jail, where he got…

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When Cabral was released from jail, he was ready to change his life.

Soon, he went Hollywood.

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Cabral eventually went from playing background roles to earning speaking roles.

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Maybe you remember him as the guy from Bruno Mars’ video for “Grenade.”

Or as Demon in the movie “End of Watch.”

Eventually, Cabral landed the perfect role in “American Crime.”

Credit: ABC Television Network / YouTube

Cabral was tasked with playing Hector Tontz, a character described as a “young man who has lived life on the fringes of society and has made bad decisions just to survive.”

Cabral’s performance was so nuanced and convincing that he was nominated for a 2015 Emmy.

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Here he is, lookin’ sharp with his wife, on the red carpet at the 2015 Emmys.

Credit: Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty

The accolades and success are nice, but, more importantly, acting allows Cabral to be a voice in his community.

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And the community is listening to and proud of Cabral. He even has a burrito named after him.

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Playing several roles as a gang member may not seem like a stretch – it could even be interpreted as typecasting.

Credit: Tommaso Boddi / Getty

But Cabral brings an authenticity and depth to his roles that keeps them from being the same old stereotypes we’ve seen time and time again. Cabral has evolved as a person and he’s now poised to evolve as an actor.

READ: A Mexican Artist Made Bear Rugs Out of Gang Members from MS-13

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A ‘Father Of The Bride’ Sequel Is Officially Coming— And It’s Going To Be Super Cuban-American!

Entertainment

A ‘Father Of The Bride’ Sequel Is Officially Coming— And It’s Going To Be Super Cuban-American!

Break out the tres leches! It’s gonna be a wedding of “epic proportions!” Cuban-style!

That’s right, the beloved 1991 film Father of the Bride is getting a remake. This time, the film will star 64-year-old actor Andy Garcia, the patriarch of a Cuban American family, struggling to see his daughter walk down the aisle.

Garcia will star in and executive produce the upcoming Warner Bros. remake of Father of the Bride, a story that will follow a Cuban American family.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Brad Pitt‘s production company, Plan B will produce the remake with Gaz Alazraki, director of Club de Cuervos, set to helm.

“I’m very excited to join The Father of the Bride, a beloved film that has brought so much joy to so many over the years and to represent my Cuban culture and heritage in this story,” Garcia explained in a statement published by THR. “I commend Warner Brothers for their foresight and celebrate this opportunity they have created.” 

Garcia’s remake is the latest in the franchise, which first came out in 1950 and starred actor Spencer Tracey and Elizabeth Taylor.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

The first film inspired a sequel, also starring Tracey and Taylor, called Father’s Little Dividend. The film was remade forty-years later with Steve Martin and Diane Keaton in the 1991 version. Garcia’s upcoming take will focus on a similar storyline. According to THR, “the latest remake will center on the father of a soon-to-be bride coming to terms with daughters’ nuptials. But the latest take will be told through the relationships in a big, sprawling Cuban-American family.”

The 1991 cast of the film reunited in September for a Netflix special. 

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BUENA VISTA PICTURES

The feature filmed memorable moments from the Nancy Meyers film and its 1995 sequel Father of the Bride II and showed “the Banks family’s” home in 2020. The reunion was produced to honor the World Central Kitchen amid the pandemic.

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This Mexican Filmmaker’s Six-Pack Inspired The Oscar Statue

Entertainment

This Mexican Filmmaker’s Six-Pack Inspired The Oscar Statue

That’s right, Oscar’s real name is actually Emilio.

When it comes to the Academy Awards, there’s nothing more iconic than the actual Oscar award. That’s right, it’s not Björk’s swan dress or Jennifer Lopez’s beloved pink gown, when people think of the Oscar Awards it’s always the rip-chested statue with broad shoulders and muscled legs. The art deco god that everyone in entertainment dreams of one-day holding: the Oscar award.

But, as familiar as he may be, it turns out we don’t know Oscar very well.

Emilio Fernandez, born in Coahuila, Mexico, became the face of the Academy Awards thanks to a close friend.

Fernandez grew up during the Mexican Revolution and according to PRI, later left high school to become an officer for the Huertista rebels. In 1925, he was captured and sentenced to 20 years in prison but managed to escape his sentence and fled to Los Angeles.

Soon enough he began working as an extra in Hollywood and picked up the nickname “El Indio” when he met Dolores Del Rio, the silent film actress and wife of MGM Art Director Cedric Gibbons. the nickname was terrible but Del Rio and Fernandez became friends and when her husband was given an opportunity to design the award statuette fate happened.

Del Rio suggested Fernandez as a model for the statue and her husband agreed.

Fernandez’s life became much greater than a statue though, he became one of the biggest stars of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. He worked in numerous film productions in Mexico and in Hollywood starring in the 1944 film María Candelaria, the 1947 film Río Escondido and Vìctimas del Pecado made in 1951.

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