#mitúWORLD

The Days Of This Famous Tijuana Border Market Are Numbered

Every day, 50,000 cars and 25,000 pedestrians cross the Tijuana-San Ysidro border, making it the busiest port of entry in the Western Hemisphere. Crossing this border can take several hours, but these wary travelers never go hungry. Nearly 1,600 food vendors await these commuters, looking to feed them all kinds of belly-warming foods: burritos, tortas, tostilocos, and sweets like nieve de garrafa are just a few of the foods available to border crossers. This has been the way of life around the border for many years, however plans to modernize the Mexican side of the border may be about to end these vendor’s way of life. The mercado operates as more than just a place to sell food: it is where many of the older vendors live.

“The older people here, we’re the ones that will be affected the most,” Nelly Carrillo told NPR, adding, “Young people can move, but we already built a foundation here.”

Measures to protect these vendors are currently being explored, yet no clear solution has come to light yet. Some are suggesting that the vendors could become certified tourism operators. This would ensure that the vendors receive lawful protection they currently do not have, and since they already act as ambassadors to their country, they are providing a service for tourists. Aside from putting people’s livelihood in jeopardy, the proposal to relocate the mercado could cause significant cultural damage. In an email from Cog•nate Collective, the cultural importance of the market was laid out: “For us, the market is a vital space, inserting character, history and a social-cultural… dimension to the process of crossing the border.”

To get the whole story, check out the comprehensive story on NPR.

[H/T] NPR: Tijuana Border Plan Could Oust A Rich Food Culture And Its Cooks


READ: This Burrito Truck Will Bring You To Tears

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

This French Bulldog Disappeared From His California Home and Was Found Weeks Later in Tijuana

Things That Matter

This French Bulldog Disappeared From His California Home and Was Found Weeks Later in Tijuana

Phot via ABCLiz/Twitter

Looks like French bulldogs just can’t stay out of the headlines! Following Lady Gaga’s harrowing dog-napping ordeal, another dramatic dog fiasco has recently made the news.

Recently, a Bay Area woman was reunited with her French bulldog, Brody, after he had been found 600 miles away…in Tijuana, Mexico.

According to Brody’s owner, Debbie Campbell, she had been frantically searching for her emotional support dog for weeks after he “wandered away” from her front yard on February 3rd.

Immediately after Brody’s disappearance, Campbell and her family launched an intense search party. They posted flyers around town and posted on social media to find her beloved Brody, but no luck. Just when the Campbells thought they would never see Brody again, they received a mysterious message from Mexico.

A man named Benjamin Gonzalez contacted the family on Facebook and told them he had bought Brody a few weeks prior, on the streets of Tijuana.

By an odd twist of fate, Gonzalez had previously lived in the Bay Area himself before being deported to Mexico two years prior. Since he had lived in the Bay Area since he was a baby, his entire family still lived there.

When Gonzalez showed his new dog to his American family, they recognized Brody from social media posts and told him that Brody looked like a local missing dog. They told him to contact Debbie Campbell.

When Gonzalez contacted her, Campbell asked him to send her a picture of Brody’s tattoo for proof. “And the minute he did I knew it was my dog,” Campbell told KGO reporters.

Gonzalez said he can relate to the dog’s situation. Gonzalez told reporters that it made sense that Brody was far from home, because the dog seemed depressed.

“I’m deported myself, and you know I’m out here by myself, so we could relate,” Gonzalez said. “He doesn’t have family here…I don’t have family here, I’m out here by myself, so you know I was like, man, if I can return him I’m going to do the right thing.”

Within 24 hours, Debbie Campbell was reunited with Brody. She was overjoyed to be with her emotional support dog again. Campbell recounted the emotional situation through tears: “When he video called us to show us the dog, that took my breath away,” Campbell said KGO. “It’s a blessing that that man called, because otherwise there’s no way we could have gotten him back.”

According to The San Francisco Chronicle, thieves have been targeting French bulldogs more and more recently due to their popularity.

A police spokesperson referred to them as a French bulldogs are considered “a high-value ticket item.” Dog-nappers can make $1,500 to $6,000 reselling the pups on the black market.

“Frenchies are ‘in’ right now,” San Francisco SPCA president Dr. Jennifer told the Chronicle. “If I had a Frenchie, I wouldn’t let it out of my sight right now.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

His Mamá Lost Her Job So This 11-Year-Old Started Trading His Toys For Food To Help Out His Family

Things That Matter

His Mamá Lost Her Job So This 11-Year-Old Started Trading His Toys For Food To Help Out His Family

Few communities have been spared by the Coronavirus pandemic. The economic impacts of the virus have left millions of people without jobs and families are struggling to make ends meet.

The situation is common all across Latin America – where millions of people work in the informal economy with little to no access to government aide. Despite the heartbreaking economic situations so many families currently face, some are getting creative in order to help put food on the table.

A boy in Tijuana has gone viral for offering up his toys in exchange for food to help feed his family.

Alexis, who is just 11-years-old, has had to grow up during some truly strange times. These challenging times are forcing all of us to reevaluate are priorities and figure out ways to help those close to us and in our communities.

For little Alexis, he saw that his family was facing a tough financial situation because of the Coronavirus pandemic. So he got creative and showed just how self-less he could be.

Alexis told Milenio, “Since my mom isn’t working anymore I’m worried. And I have two abuelos – my grandfather is blind and he was going to have surgery but they had to cancel it because of the Coronavirus.

The 11-year-old asked his mom how we could help her and that’s when he came up with an idea. He would get together his most previous toys and offer them up to people willing to exchange them for precious food items for the family.

Alexis’ story quickly went viral and people showed up to help him out.

¡Increíble gesto! 👏🧸 Niño de #Tijuana cambia sus juguetes por despensa para su mamá. Si deseas apoyar, están sobre la…

Posted by El Sol de Tijuana on Saturday, April 25, 2020

Alexis is offering up balls, stuffed animals, action figures, and other things that kids his age shouldn’t have to give up just to help his family put food on the table. But he’s doing it anyway.

Thankfully, the community has stepped up to help. In fact, the family was overwhelmed with support that they’ve now been able to share much of the donated goods with other families who face a similar situation.

Sadly, it hasn’t all been positive news since their story went viral.

According to the family, a man posed as a well-wisher coming by to drop off some donated food items to the family. Instead, after a short struggle the man robbed the mother of her cell phone and took off – also not having donated a single item to the family.

The local news had published the family’s address so people could arrive and provide assistance but, unfortunately, someone decided to take advantage.

Mexico has struggled to contain the Coronavirus outbreak and Baja California has been hit particularly hard.

It’s been give weeks since the first case of Covid-19 was diagnosed in Baja California. And the outlook for many of the state’s residents – especially those working in the informal sector – looks more and more complicated. Workers have had to find different ways to come up with new resources and income to help support their families.

Streets were once filled with vendors selling fresh mangos and tacos de canasta – now they’re selling hand sanitizer and face masks instead.

The economist José Luis Contreras Valenzuela has warned that many companies are also hurting as a result of having no customers. They’re likely to have to layoff even more staff. One example is the state’s restaurant industry which employers more than 200,000 people.

Just a few days ago, the head of the Ministry of the Economy, Mario Escobedo Carignan, pointed out that there were 11,000 lost jobs in Baja California, but this number is likely to grow.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com