Music’s Biggest Night Is Officially Postponed As COVID-19 Wreaks Havoc On California

Entertainment

Music’s Biggest Night Is Officially Postponed As COVID-19 Wreaks Havoc On California

Kevin Winter / Getty

The 2021 Grammys won’t be taking place as expected at the end of the month. According to Rolling Stone, the Grammys have been postponed indefinitely thanks to the extreme surge of COVID-19 cases in the Los Angeles area – which is where the Grammys take place year after year.

The shocking surge in cases of COVID-19 have forced the Grammys to postpone the award show.

It was announced just this week that Los Angeles County – which is currently experiencing one the worst outbreaks in the world – is seeing someone die of COVID-19 every 15 minutes. Meanwhile, a reported 7,600 people in LA are hospitalized with COVID symptoms.

As many Angelenos – and Americans across the country – remain under strict stay-at-home orders, it would definitely not seem right to move forward with a glitzy award show that would risk making the outbreak worse.

As a result, the Grammys are planning a limited production event to take place in March, according to The Fader. In other words, no live audience and only performers and presenters on-site. Nominees and winners would likely accept their awards remotely like many of last year’s award ceremonies during the first wave of the pandemic.

This year’s Grammys were expected to feature big moments for the Latin music industry.

Bad Bunny was expected to pick up awards and was rumored as a performer. Other Latino nominees included J Balvin, Camilo, Arca and Lido Pimienta. Meanwhile, Selena was also scheduled to receive a posthumous Lifetime Achievement Award that her family was planning to accept on her behalf.

Original Story Posted November 10, 2020:

Seriously, it was just last year that some of the world’s most popular artists – reggaetoneros and trap artists like Bad Bunny and J Balvin – were completely ignored. I mean it was so serious there was even a hashtag: “Sin Reggaetón, No Hay Grammy.”

At the 2019 Latin Grammy Awards, the top award categories very conspicuously left out these very artists. However, this year they’re dominating all the categories and bringing in a record number of nominations.

The 2020 Latin Grammy nominations are in and they definitely do a better job at representing the community than last year’s.

In 2019, the Latin Grammy’s went viral but really for all the wrong reasons. social media exploded as Latin artists posted images of the Grammy logo with a large red “X″ across it, with words on the image reading in Spanish: “Without reggaeton, there’s no Latin Grammys.” Balvin even skipped the live show and Bad Bunny, who won best urban music album during the telecast, told the audience: “With all due respect, reggaeton is part of the Latin culture.”

This definitely forced the Grammy’s to reconsider this year’s awards.

“Over the last year, we continued engaging in discussions with our members to improve the awards process and actively encouraged diverse Latin music creators to join and participate,” Latin Academy President and CEO Gabriel Abaroa Jr. said in a statement, calling this year’s nominees “a group that reflects the constant evolution of Latin music.”

To honor Latin rap and reggaeton performers, the Latin Grammys added new categories this year, including best reggaeton performance and best rap/hip-hop song.

J Balvin leads the pack with an astonishing 13 Grammy nominations.

In announcing this year’s nominees, J Balvin is in the lead with 13 total nods, including two nominations Album of the year, thanks to his own album Colores and his collab with Bad Bunny, OASIS.

The Colombian reggaetonero has a chance to win his first album of the year prize — a category with 10 contenders – and his chances look pretty good. However, even if he doesn’t pick up that, he’s in the running for several other awards.

Bad Bunny is close behind with nine nominations for what was a record-breaking year for the artist.

Bad Bunny is included in the Album of the Year category for his album YHLQMDLG (which was this year’s best-selling Latin album), however, his surprise album, LAS QUE NO IBAN A SALIR, wasn’t recognized in any category.

In the Best Urban album category, Bad Bunny’s YHLQMDLG is up against Anuel AA’s Emmanuel, Benito’s Oasis with J Balvin, Balvin’s Colores, Feid’s Ferxxo: Vol. 1 M.O.R., Ozuna’s Nibiru, Sech’s 1 of 1, and rising Puerto Rican rapper Myke Towers’Easy Money Baby.

Meanwhile, the Album of the Year category could get pretty interesting with this caliber of nominees.

This year’s Album of the Year category prove what an incredible year 2020 was for Latin music. We were blessed with hit after hit which was all the more important considering what a traumatic year it’s been.

Bad Bunny and J Balvin are both competing for the award. San Benito’s YHLQMDLG faces off against Balvin’s Colores and their joint album OASIS. Meanwhile, albums from Camilo (Por Primera Vez), Ricky Martin (PAUSA EP), and Kany García (Mesa Para Dos), are all up for the same award. What’s extra special about this category this year is that it’s also featuring three nominees from the LGBTQ community.

This year’s top-selling record, “Tusa”, is also up for a Grammy.

Colombian reggaetonera Karol G along with Trinidadian rapper Nicki Minaj are nominated for this hit song that has just blown up the airwaves this entire year.

“Tusa” is the sole Latin trap nominee in the song of the year category, where 11 tracks are in contention. It’s a departure for Karol G, who didn’t receive a single nomination last year and was part of the group of uber-successful Latin trap and reggaeton artists who were dissed in top categories like album, song and record of the year. This year, the Colombian performer who was named best new artist in 2018 has four nominations, including two shared with Minaj.

It’s encouraging to see the academy actually reflect what is happening in Latin music. The inclusion of this larger variety of artists helps illustrate just how diverse the Latin music industry really is. But to see who actually takes home the awards will be a different story. The Latin Grammy Awards will air live from Miami on Nov. 19 on Univision.

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The Latin Grammys Just Announced A New Host That Has Fans Excited For This Year’s Awards

Entertainment

The Latin Grammys Just Announced A New Host That Has Fans Excited For This Year’s Awards

Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

It’s official: award season is among us. We just celebrated the Billboard Music Awards and Latin Music Week and now we’re on to the 21st Latin Grammys.

Despite the insane year we’ve all experienced, it’s safe to say that one highlight of the year has been the music. From Bad Bunny and Cardi B to J Balvin, Maluma, and Karol G, we’ve been blessed with some serious bops this year.

To help us recognize all the incredible talent from our community, the academy has announced they’ve tapped Oscar-nominated actress Yalitza Aparicio to co-host this year’s show. The Indigenous-Mexican’s star continues to shine bright ever since her debut in the 2018 film Roma and we can’t wait to see her taking on this exciting new role.

The Latin Grammys have tapped Yalitza Aparicio to co-host the upcoming award ceremony.

It’s been a year since her historic Oscar nomination for Best Actress for her debut performance in Alfonso Cuarón’s Roma, and she’s been busy ever since. Now, we’ll get to see her take on another major awards show: The 21st Latin Grammys.

The Indigenous Mexican actress will co-host Latin music’s biggest night after original co-host Roselyn Sánchez dropped out due to an injury. The Latin Recording Academy announced Wednesday that Aparicio would take over hosting duties alongside actress Ana Brenda Contreras and singer Carlos Rivera.

“We had been in discussions for some time about having me host, but it was the theme of the night that really caught my attention,” Aparicio told EW of her new gig. “I really believe in that message, especially now as we find ourselves in such critical times where so many people are feeling isolated. 

“Music has the power to motivate and to lift our spirits. I select what I’ll listen to based on what my needs are at the time. If I need some energy, I crank up the Reggaeton. I’m the type of person that needs music in order to get my day going. If I don’t play Reggaeton in the morning, I’ll go back to sleep.”

The announcement comes shortly after the original host – Roselyn Sánchez – was forced to drop out due to injury.

Of course, we’re excited to see Aparicio taking the stage to co-host this year’s award ceremony. However, before she was announced as a co-host, Puerto Rican actress Roselyn Sánchez was set to host.

“Friends, with a heavy heart, I must inform you that I will no longer be participating in the Latin Grammys ceremony this year,” Sánchez wrote on Instagram last week in Spanish. “I suffered a fall, and my doctor put a boot on me. The doctor’s recommendation was to avoid standing for long periods of time or wearing heels. I’m going to miss you.”

Aparicio has been proud to represent her community on the big screen and at events and ceremonies around the world.

Ever since her debut role in Roma, Aparicio has been no stranger to award season. She made history last year as the first Indigenous Mexican performer to be nominated for lead actress after winning hearts as Cleo, a resilient housekeeper caring for a middle-class family in 1970s Mexico City while enduring great personal loss.

Aparicio – a former schoolteacher-turned-actress – has proudly been using her platform to advocate for domestic workers and Indigenous communities after representing them on the big screen in Netflix’s Roma.

“Every step I take, I carry with me a community that doesn’t see themselves reflected in media. I work hard to ensure we are represented the right way,” she told Entertainment Weekly upon Wednesday’s Latin Grammys announcement. 

“I am conscious of the fact that I am not alone in this world. We are an important part of society, and I carry every voice out there that feels silenced due to lack of representation in Hollywood. I know who I am, and nothing will deter me from lifting up others.”

Although they’ll be very different from year’s past, the upcoming ceremony looks like it’ll be a must watch.

Credit: Mindy Small/FilmMagic

Thanks to the pandemic, this year’s awards ceremony will obviously be quite different from years past – but they still sound like it will definitely be worth tuning into.

Although there won’t be a live audience nor a red carpet, the 21st Latin Grammy Awards will feature a heavy lineup of some of the year’s top artists, including performances by Anitta, J Balvin, Camilo, Lupita Infante, Juanes, Mariachi Sol de México de José Hernández, Ricky Martin, Carla Morrison, José Luis Perales and Prince Royce.

Other previously announced performers include Anuel AA, Marc Anthony, Bad Bunny, Calibre 50, Pedro Capó, Julio Reyes Copello, Alex Cuba, Alejandro Fernández, Karol G, Kany García, Guaynaa, Los Tigres del Norte, Víctor Manuelle, Ricardo Montaner, Christian Nodal, Debi Nova, Fito Páez, Nathy Peluso, Raquel Sofía and Sebastián Yatra.

Also exciting is that this year, the academy introduced three new categories: Best Pop/Rock Song, Best Reggaeton Performance, and Best Rap/Hip-Hop Song. Leading this year’s nominations are Balvin, Bad Bunny and Ozuna, all of whom received nods for the coveted record of the year trophy.

The ceremony is set to air on November 19 on Univision via live broadcast from Miami, while concerts will be taking place at various places around the world. Will you be tuning in?

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