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Trump Reportedly Threatened To Send Military To Mexico In Phone Call With EPN

Image Credit: CONADE / Flickr and Gage Skidmore / Flickr

A week after President Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto faced off over a possible border wall, things continue to remain tense.

According to the Associated Press, during a phone call with Mexican President Peña Nieto, President Trump threatened to send the U.S. military to Mexico unless EPN stopped the “bad hombres” in the country.

The Associated Press says it received an official transcript of the conversation from a Mexican official who preferred to remain anonymous. Here’s an excerpt provided by the AP:

“You have a bunch of bad hombres down there. You aren’t doing enough to stop them. I think your military is scared. Our military isn’t, so I just might send them down to take care of it.”

The AP’s report appears to corroborate a previous story by Mexican news organization Aristegui Noticias, which reported that Peña Nieto was “humiliated” during their phone conversation.

According to Dolia Estevez, a Mexican reporter who had access to the conversation, Trump told EPN that he “didn’t need Mexico or Mexicans.” He then criticized Mexico’s military for not doing enough to stop drug cartels.

Estevez: “Fue una conversación muy ofensiva donde Trump humilló a Peña Nieto.” (It was a very offensive conversation in which Trump humiliated Peña Nieto).

Mexico’s government has denied the reports, telling the Associated Press that they are “based on falsehoods.”


READ: After Trump Threatens To Cancel Meeting With Mexico, Enrique Peña Nieto Beats Him To The Punch

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The People In The Fields: Coachella Valley Farm Worker Documentary Project

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The People In The Fields: Coachella Valley Farm Worker Documentary Project

In the background, silent, with worn faces and weathered hands, a group of people pick produce or fruit, sorting or packing goods. “Bultos,” says Noé Montes, a Los Angeles-based photographer. A bulge in the ground, that’s how most people imagine farm workers, he says.



Montes, who grew up in a family of farmworkers that labored in California’s Central and San Joaquin Valleys, started taking photos of farmworkers early on in his career and mainly on his personal time. But after applying and being awarded a fellowship from the Alicia Patterson Foundation, he narrowed his initial idea of doing a statewide farmworker photo project down to the Coachella Valley area.



He eventually settled on an idea: the Coachella Valley Farm Workers project.



https://www.instagram.com/p/BQQ0N-fhtCt/



Montes interviewed and photographed 15 residents throughout a two-year span starting in 2015. All of them come from different backgrounds. Some immigrated to the US under the Bracero program, others came undocumented looking for work in the fields, and some were children of farm workers that went to college and now returned in hopes of uplifting their community.



https://www.instagram.com/p/BQlJ-TBBoSN/



Montes said he didn’t want to show the common image of a farmworker hunched over in the fields, but an intimate side of their lives at home, at a playground where they grew up, or with their partners.



“They’re not a symbol of poverty or a metaphor for inequality,” Montes said. “They’re people.”



https://www.instagram.com/p/BQvwYJOhqc6/



Montes said that he understands that life working the fields is tough. Many of the issues that farmworkers were fighting over 50 years ago — like shading or bathrooms — or dealing with — homelessness, domestic violence — are still the ones seen in their lives.



https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ0yX_MhBWl/



Yet, his upbringing gave him an appreciation for the social assets that farmworkers possess.



“Because I grew up in that community I know what those people are like: very intelligent, very sophisticated thinkers. They have so much to give to their own community but also to society in a larger way, our understanding of each other,” Montes said.



https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ0y5moBGsH/



Montes is currently working on exhibitions locally to showcase his photos.



https://www.instagram.com/p/BQdXVyllckV/



For now, he’s posting regular updates on his Instagram.



https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ0zaA0hg8o/



Visit the Coachella Valley Farm Workers Project here.