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President Obama Got Very Close With An Argentinian Tango Dancer

President and First Lady Obama, who recently visited Argentina, took to the dance floor during a state dinner in Buenos Aires. After tango dancers Mora Godoy and José Lugones showed off their exceptional dancing chops, they invited a reluctant President Obama and First Lady to dance. You have to see this.

Mora Godoy and José Lugones totally killed it on the dance floor.

Credit: Best Vines Perú / YouTube

Like, whose legs even naturally move that fast?

The two of them in unison is a work of art.

Credit: Best Vines Perú / YouTube

The dancing stopped when Godoy decided that Obama should get a chance to show off his moves.

Credit: Best Vines Perú / YouTube

And, for obvious reasons, he was a little hesitant.

Credit: Best Vines Perú / YouTube

But we all know you can never say no to a Latina.

So, the president got out of his seat and tangoed like he had never tangoed before.

Credit: Best Vines Perú / YouTube

#SlayPresSlay

And by the end of the dance, Obama was definitely getting the hang of it.

Credit: Best Vines Perú / YouTube

Don’t worry. Michelle got hers as she glided around the dance floor with José.

Credit: Best Vines Perú / YouTube

And Godoy had a quick chat with Michelle afterward.

Credit: Best Vines Perú / YouTube

Maybe she was letting Michelle know that her dance with the president was just a dance.

Because we all know that Michelle don’t play that.

Credit: @OndoTv / Twitter

Check out the full video below to see all the performances from the night.

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Credit: Best Vines Perú / YouTube

READ: This Officer Interrupted a Dominican Day Parade… So He Could Dance a Little Salsa

What do you think of the president’s tango skills? Share this story with your friends by tapping that share button below and show them that Mr. and Mrs. Obama got some sick dance moves.

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Sol de Bernardo Has A New Outlook On Education Thanks To Papumba

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Sol de Bernardo Has A New Outlook On Education Thanks To Papumba

If there is one thing the pandemic has proven to be essential, it’s the internet. For Sol de Bernardo, head of content creation at Papumba, access to technology should be “a basic right.”

Adjusting to remote learning was tough for students when lockdowns were implemented around the world last year. The parents of the children also took a toll while trying to balance child care, school, and work at the same time.

“During this pandemic, I am a believer that technology is a great ally for those who could have the connection and technology to continue learning,” de Bernardo told mitú.

Unable to physically interact with friends, many children have spent hours endlessly scrolling and gaming without limits. Apps like Papumba are trying to add meaning to a child’s screen time easing parents’ concerns.

Papumba is an educational gaming app geared for children ages 2-7.

Photo courtesy of Apple

De Bernardo says the app has become “a resource widely used by parents to entertain and educate their children in this time” after seeing a spike in subscriptions.

However, for low-income families in Argentina where Papumba is based, many children are vulnerable to the lack of connectivity.

“There is a big inequality problem [and] it’s not a distant reality,” says de Bernardo.

In Argentina, 75 percent of children from low-income families don’t have access to computers. Out of those that do, 36 percent don’t have internet access.

To accommodate families Papumba often lowers their monthly prices, even offering promo codes but de Bernardo wishes access to tech could be given throughout.

A proud Latina in tech, de Bernardo’s journey was not instantaneous.

Photo courtesy of Apple.

De Bernardo started out as an educator and that background got her interested in the connection between education and technology. This intimate knowledge of the specific issue led her to bridge that gap.

“Privileged” to be working in tech, de Bernardo is encouraging other young girls to take an interest in STEM. Some advice de Bernardo has to offer young girls is to first get access to a computer, network when you can, and be confident.

“It may be difficult to have confidence in a world full of things that aren’t always good for women, but trust yourself, be dedicated, and above all, be resilient and humble,” she says.

While still a young company, de Bernardo hopes to develop more tangible devices for children to use in classrooms like high-tech dolls and books. However, her current focus is on quality education through the app.

De Bernardo wants to push Papumba to include educating children on their emotional wellbeing.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“We do not talk about emotions enough,” she says. ” We have an activity to recognize emotions where an animated child will form emotions and explains them so the children can understand that there are different emotions and it’s okay to have them.”

When introducing touchy subjects like bullying, de Bernardo finds it important to focus on teaching young children solutions to dilemmas explaining that “the explanation of the problems may not be easy for a 3-year-old to understand.”

Nevertheless, delivering context in a simplistic way is included in such activities. Most recently, the app released a game inspired by the pandemic.

An instant success, the game introduces the imaginary town of ‘Papumba Land,’ where kids can engage in replicated outdoor activities such as: hosting a barbecue, partying with friends, or having a picnic in the park.

Last month, in-person learning returned to Argentina, but de Bernardo hopes that a year online changes the approach in future children’s education.

“I think that technology can help us in this by putting adding a little fun for the child,” she says. “Learning does not have to be [treated] like a mandate where you have to learn something and repeat the year if you fail. There has to be something for the child to want to learn.”

“[Working at] Papumba has helped me understand that you can create something fun for children to enjoy learning and not make it seem like going to school is a nuisance,” she says.

The App Store featured Papumba for Women’s History Month.

READ: Nicole Chapaval Advocates For More Latinas In Tech Through Teaching App Platzi

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Scientists In Argentina Discover Fossils From What They Call One Of The World’s Largest Land Animals Ever

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Scientists In Argentina Discover Fossils From What They Call One Of The World’s Largest Land Animals Ever

Scientists have unearthed in Argentina’s Patagonian wilderness fossils of what may be the oldest-known member of the dinosaur group known as titanosaurs that includes the largest land animals in Earth’s history.

The discovery is significant since it appears that these mega-large dinosaurs may have lived on Earth sooner than we thought, and that they may have originated from the Southern Hemisphere.

The fossils found in Argentina are from the Ninjatitan, thought to live on Earth more than 140 million years ago.

Scientists have unearthed fossils of what may be the oldest-known member of the dinosaur group known as titanosaurs, known as Ninjatitan. The dinosaur’s incomplete skeletal remains were discovered in Argentina’s Patagonian wilderness, south of the city of Neuquen. 

The creature was named after Argentine paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia, nicknamed “El Ninja,” and technician Rogelio Zapata, according to AFP.

“It is the oldest record known, not only from Argentina but worldwide,” study lead author Pablo Gallina, a researcher at the National Council for Scientific and Technical Research of Argentina (CONICET), told Reuters.

“This discovery is also very important for the knowledge of the evolutionary history of sauropods because the fossil records of the Early Cretaceous epoch, in around 140 million years ago, are really very scarce throughout the world,” he said in a statement.

At a length of about 65 feet (20 meters), Ninjatitan was a large dinosaur, but much smaller than later titanosaurs such as Argentinosaurus that reached a length of around 115 feet (35 meters). The researchers also said the presence of such an early titanosaur in Patagonia supports the idea that titanosaurs originated in the Southern Hemisphere.

Titanosaurs were likely the largest dinosaurs to ever roam the Earth.

An artist's conception of the Ninjatitan zapatai dinosaur, which roamed the Earth some 140 million years ago.
Credit: Jorge Gonzalez / INAH

Titanosaurs are a group of long-necked, plant-eating dinosaurs that may have been the largest animals ever to walk the Earth, according to Reuters. Known as Ninjatitan zapatai, the recently discovered animal was about 66 feet in length and had a long neck and tail, Sci-News said. 

The new discovery meant titanosaurs lived longer ago than previously thought – at the beginning of the Cretaceous era that ended with the demise of the dinosaurs about 66 million years ago.

Titanosaurs are part of a larger dinosaur group called sauropods that includes others with similar body designs such as Brontosaurus and Diplodocus that lived in North America during the Jurassic Period, which preceded the Cretaceous Period.

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