#mitúWORLD

ICYMI: Fifth Harmony, Becky G and Luis Coronel Took Over Premios Juventud

The night started with a warning to Donald Trump:

Credit: PremiosJuventud/Youtube

Pitbull had one simple message: “Watch out for El Chapo, PAPO.”

Jorge Ramos also chimed in…

Credit:igfootballhd/Youtube

“When election day comes we are going to remember who had our backs and who was against us,” said Ramos, who encouraged everyone to vote.

READ: Trump, If You Throw Punches, Latinos Fight Back

Then Fifth Harmony hit the stage.????? 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJ3xg5keNt4

Credit: UnivisionMusica/Youtube

In scandalizing red outfits, Fifth Harmony sang the Spanish version of their hit song “Worth It.”

READ: Camila Cabello of Fifth Harmony Skipped Her Quinceañera to Become a Pop Star

Becky G got some lip action from J Balvin.

Luis Coronel kept thanking God.

Credit: Univision

Coronel had a good reason. He was the second highest winner of the night with four awards. Enrique Iglesias, who missed the show, took home five.

Calibre 50 moved the audience to tears with a Joan Sebastian tribute.

Don Francisco got some love, too.

RBD fans were giddy with the return of Anahí.

Credit: UnivisionMUSICA/YouTube

The Mexican singer, who hasn’t performed on stage in six years, closed out the night with Wisin to sing her new single, “Rumba.”

What was your favorite Premius Juventud moment? Let us know.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Top 10 All-Women Collaborations in Latin Music

Latidomusic

Top 10 All-Women Collaborations in Latin Music

In honor of Women’s History Month, Latido Music has lined up 10 of our favorite all-women collaborations in Latin Music. In no particular order, here’s 10 girl-power anthems that we should be bumping all year long.

“Sin Pijama”

Mexican-American singer Becky G flipped the script on the antiquated idea that two women couldn’t get a hit together when she collaborated with Dominican reggaetonera Natti Natasha. Their fun and flirty music video for “Sin Pijama” has racked up over 1.8 billion on views on YouTube, outpacing some of top reggaetoneros. Following the success of this knockout duo, collaboration among women in Latin music has been on the rise, and we love to see it.

“Tick Tock”

Mexican pop icon Thalía has been one of the top proponents for all-women collaborations. She became the first Mexican female artist to score a billion a views on YouTube with “No Me Acuerdo” featuring Natasha. On 2018’s Valiente album, Thalía also teamed up with Argentine pop princess Lali for “Lindo Pero Bruto.” Last year, Thalía joined forces with her Latin Music Queens co-stars, fellow Mexicana Sofía Reyes and Colombian rapper Farina, for the empowering “Tick Tock.” The trio of women didn’t have time for any foolishness.

“Tusa”

Trini-American superstar Nicki Minaj got all up her in reggaeton gig on Karol G’s “Tusa.” She was even singing a bit in Spanish with the Colombian reggaetonera. Last year, Minaj had everyone, even the guys, singing, “Ahora soy una chica mala.” This was a regal bop fit for two queens and they wore that crown well. The song also garnered Minaj her first Latin Grammy nomination. That’s the power of “La Tusa.”

“No Al Aguacil”

One overlooked all-women collaboration is Mexican goddess Gloria Trevi’s “No Al Aguacil” with fellow Mexicana Paulina Rubio. The song was never released as a single (thought it should’ve been one) and it’s buried in Trevi’s 2011 album Gloria. Very much reflecting the early 2010s, “No Al Aguacil” is an electro-pop moment that these pop icons served with plenty of girl power.

“22”

In 2019, Argentine pop princess Tini came through with one of the best collaborations of the year. For kiss-off anthem “22,” she teamed up with Colombian singer Greeicy. Tini, who was turning 22 at the time, was not going to let any heartbreak rain on her birthday celebrations. Greeicy served as another voice of reason for why crying over that guy would not be worth it. This cumbiatón moment was everything.

“Santería”

Last year, Spanish star Lola Índigo recruited Mexican pop princess Danna Paola and Chilean singer Denise Rosenthal for “Santería.” Each woman adds their own flair and attitude to this bubbling pop cauldron. Like the Charmed sisters, the power of three is real here, and together these women serve a spellbinding collaboration.

“Ladrón”

Argentine pop princess Lali teamed up with Argentina’s top woman in Latin trap, Cazzu, last year. The alluring “Ladrón” was a moment of girl power that highlighted the talent in their country. The two women united in turning the tables on a no-good men. “You wanted to play me… the one that’s playing you is me,” Lali and Cazzu sang together.

“High” Remix

Last year, rising Argentine singer Maria Becerra upped the girl power of her breakthrough hit “High.” For the all-women remix, she teamed up with Índigo and her compatriot Tini. Together, they also upped the angst factor on this mesmerizing, trap-lite bop.  

“La Rueda”

Ivonne Galaz and Natalie López are making way for women in the male-dominated corridos tumbados space. As the two women signed to the Rancho Humilde record label, they teamed up for “La Rueda” on last year’s Corridos Tumbados Vol. 2 album. What a moment to hear two Mexicanas find strength in each other’s stories of overcoming the struggle. Galaz and López tap into an emotion in the genre that the guys can’t touch.

“Modo Turbo”

Three Brazilian queens joined forces for last year’s “Modo Turbo.” Anitta and Luísa Sonza aligned with drag pop superstar Pabllo Vittar. “Fasten your seatbelt / Turbo mode,” Sonza encouraged in Portuguese. They certainly took their fans for a wild ride with this fierce and stellar collaboration.  

Click here for Latido Music, 24/7 Latin music videos & more

Read: Natti Natasha Assembles “Las Nenas” Video with Farina, Cazzu, and La Duraca

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

This Mexican Filmmaker’s Six-Pack Inspired The Oscar Statue

Entertainment

This Mexican Filmmaker’s Six-Pack Inspired The Oscar Statue

That’s right, Oscar’s real name is actually Emilio.

When it comes to the Academy Awards, there’s nothing more iconic than the actual Oscar award. That’s right, it’s not Björk’s swan dress or Jennifer Lopez’s beloved pink gown, when people think of the Oscar Awards it’s always the rip-chested statue with broad shoulders and muscled legs. The art deco god that everyone in entertainment dreams of one-day holding: the Oscar award.

But, as familiar as he may be, it turns out we don’t know Oscar very well.

Emilio Fernandez, born in Coahuila, Mexico, became the face of the Academy Awards thanks to a close friend.

Fernandez grew up during the Mexican Revolution and according to PRI, later left high school to become an officer for the Huertista rebels. In 1925, he was captured and sentenced to 20 years in prison but managed to escape his sentence and fled to Los Angeles.

Soon enough he began working as an extra in Hollywood and picked up the nickname “El Indio” when he met Dolores Del Rio, the silent film actress and wife of MGM Art Director Cedric Gibbons. the nickname was terrible but Del Rio and Fernandez became friends and when her husband was given an opportunity to design the award statuette fate happened.

Del Rio suggested Fernandez as a model for the statue and her husband agreed.

Fernandez’s life became much greater than a statue though, he became one of the biggest stars of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. He worked in numerous film productions in Mexico and in Hollywood starring in the 1944 film María Candelaria, the 1947 film Río Escondido and Vìctimas del Pecado made in 1951.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com