Things That Matter

Can You Guess Who Mr. Worldwide’s Best Republican Friends Are?

You know how Pitbull has become BFF’s with SO many celebrities? Like, they ALL want to be his friend? Well, seems like politicians want in on some Pitbull lovin’, too — specifically Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio.

“I have a relationship with Jeb Bush and I have a relationship with Marco Rubio, and when we sit down and talk, we don’t talk politics,” Pitbull said to Fox Latino.

Anyone would think that these two are looking for Pitbull’s presidential endorsements, but the singer has been clear about that for a while: “[they’re] not looking for endorsements. They like to hang out and talk. And I like to hang out and talk. I like to learn. I like to hear what they got going on and what they’re thinking.” So just guys being guys?

READ: Taylor Swift Performed in Miami, So of Course She Brought Out Ricky Martin and Pitbull

Of the two, Pitbull seems to be closer to Bush. During a Howard Stern interview, the rapper shared how he told Bush about his nickname [SPOILER: Bush can be really funny]:

“I said, ‘Well, I was on the way to a pit bull fight, and a Dominican friend of mine was like, ‘Yo, that should be your name — you’re always out here fighting these guys and battling in rap and this.’ And Jeb goes, ‘Well, good thing you weren’t on the way to a cockfight.’”

Ha!

Read what else Pitbull has to say about the Republican presidential candidates from Billboard here.

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Two Republican Senators Post Photos Of Elijah Cummings While Honoring John Lewis

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Two Republican Senators Post Photos Of Elijah Cummings While Honoring John Lewis

Kevin Dietsch - Pool / Getty Images

This weekend, the U.S. lost one of the greatest Civil Rights icons in history. Rep. John Lewis died July 17, 2020, and tributes poured out for the long-running congressman.

Congressman John Lewis leaves behind a legacy of racial justice and activism for civil rights.

Rep. Lewis was a major leader in the Civil Rights movement in 1960s Alabama. On March 7, 1965, Lewis led a group of people marching to Montgomery, the Alabama capital, in order to vote. As the group tried crossing the bridge, state troopers attacked the protesters. Lewis sustained a cracked skull during that attack. Every year after, Lewis crossed that bridge on the anniversary to commemorate the fight.

Tributes poured in on social media praising the congressman’s legacy of fighting for justice.

Rep. Lewis was relentless in his fight for justice and for racial equality. He was arrested several times throughout his life while fighting the injustices he wanted to change in this country. The activism eventually led him to a life of politics. The 80-year-old politician was first elected to Georgia’s 5th congressional district in 1987 and he served his district until his death.

On the eve of his death, the Supreme Court announced a decision that barred 1 million former felons from having their right to vote restored. This was something for which Rep. Lewis started with his fight for justice. He fought for the right of people to vote and would always remind people of their duty to vote in honor of those who fought for the right. The decision was a reminder that his fight was not over.

“There is no person more associated with the sacred right to vote in our lifetime than John Lewis,” Michigan Representative Dan Kildee told the Atlanta Journal Consitution. “To be able to execute his vote — to cast his vote for him — is an honor I will be able to keep with me until the day I die.”

Kildee was chosen by Rep. Lewis to cast his votes for him while he was in hospice. Rep. Lewis was ill from pancreatic cancer during his last days serving the people of Georgia’s 5th congressional district.

Florida Senator Marco Rubio offered his condolences but used the wrong picture.

Rep. Elijah Cummings died in October 2019 of complications from health issues. People are stunned that Sen. Rubio, who has worked with both Cummings and Lews in the past, would mix the two up.

The very uncomfortable mix up was exacerbated when Senator Dan Sullivan made the same mistake.

That’s right. Two senators made the mistake of posting a photo of themselves with Rep. Elijah Cummings. Rep. Lewis knew very well that this confusion was a long-running issue and made jokes about it in the past. On April 1, 2019, Rep. Lewis released a statement on how he was going to start ming sure people can tell them apart: a beard or head tattoo.

“I considered getting a tattoo on the back of my head, just to clear things up. I tried to convince Elijah to get one too, but that didn’t go over so well.,” reads Rep. Lewis’s statement. “I guess being mistaken does have its advantages, though. Elijah’s younger than me, so I guess being mistaken for him is kind of a compliment. Maybe one day when I have a schedule conflict, I’ll see if he wouldn’t mind sitting in a hearing for me. You think anybody would notice?”

Sen. Rubio eventually tweeted the correct image but not before the damage was done.

The tweet corrects the mistake but is a little too late considering the speed of screengrabs. At least he did take the steps to change the tweet and admit that he did post the wrong image.

Of course, people took the time to turn the narrative and misidentified both Sullivan and Rubio.

Those are fellow Republican senators John Cornyn and Ted Cruz of Texas. The mix up is an embarrassing reminder of the racial microaggressions still alive and well today. The moment has reminded people of the trope that all Black people look alike and that is something we are hyperaware of in the current political atmosphere and cultural shift.

READ: Over 60 Politicians Are Boycotting Trump’s Inauguration

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Pitbull Is Helping Latino Business Owners Financially Affected By COVID-19

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Pitbull Is Helping Latino Business Owners Financially Affected By COVID-19

pitbull / Instagram

Latinos are suffering harder economic downfalls because of Covid-19. Latinos have disproportionately been laid off and experienced pay cuts as businesses closed because of the pandemic. Pitbull teamed up with Priceline and Hello Alice to give Latino owned small businesses an emergency grant.

Pitbull is teaming up with two organizations to give money to Latino owned small businesses.

The program is aimed at giving businesses up to $10,000 to keep their businesses open. Latino unemployment in the U.S. is 18.9 percent because of Covid-19. That means that 4 million, or 1 in every 5 Latinos, is currently unemployed because of the virus.

Latinos are currently experiencing the worst economic loss to the community since the Great Recession.

The Latino and Black communities have born the brunt of the economic ups and downs of the U.S. economy. The current unemployment statistics are the worst for Latinos since the Great Recession. During that time, Latinos lost 66 percent of their wealth. The novel coronavirus has exposed the precarious economic state of the Latino community in an economy with stagnant wages yet rising costs of living.

In February, the Latino unemployment rate was 4.4 percent.

President Trump has bragged about the unemployment rate for the Latino and Black populations. Latinas are the largest and fastest-growing group of entrepreneurs in the U.S. and the pandemic has hit the community hard. Pitbull’s program could help to keep those entrepreneurs afloat.

Businesses can be awarded up to $10,000. The reason for financial help is more than unemployment. Organizers of the fund also point to the number of Latino businesses that were denied funding through the federal government.

“We found out the centers for responsible lending said that 91% of all Latino applicants of government Phase one funding got rejected. Secondly, the sectors that can’t work from home. ‘You can’t be a waiter at home there are no customers,’” Jeff Hoffman, founder of Priceline, told CBS Miami.

Hoffman added: “A competitor before, are now your friends. Reach out to those businesses near you talk to those people ask what ideas work for them and what resources they can share and we’ll figure this out together.”

READ: After Their Mom’s Restaurant Shut Down, Mexican-American Twin Brothers Launched A Loan Co. To Help Latino Small Businesses Thrive

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