things that matter

An Anti-Violence Muralist was Shot and Killed in Oakland and the Community Wants Answers

Violence
Wayne Freedman / Twitter

Antonio Ramos was a muralist who worked with middle schoolers to promote non-violence through art.

https://twitter.com/stopbeingfamous/status/649981050022690817

He worked specifically in West Oakland, a community that has been plagued with senseless violent attacks.

He and his team were working on a mural titled “Boy with Power to Heal and Stop Violence.”

Ramos was working with Attitudinal Healing Connection and Oakland Super Heroes Mural Project to promote non-violence in West Oakland.

They mural was going to be big – 4,000 feet BIG.

Ramos was working on the mural when a passerby started an argument.

#AntonioRamos

A photo posted by Paul Callis (@paw.l) on

The mural was the third of a six-mural project to beautify West Oakland and lower violence using art.

During the argument, the stranger shot Ramos multiple times and fled.

Ramos died of his injuries and the gunman is still at large. AHC has launched an Indiegogo campaign to pay his funeral costs.

Police are offering a $10,000 reward on information that will lead to the arrest of Ramos’ killer.

And a makeshift vigil has been erected in his memory.

Fellow artists are promising to finish the mural and dedicate it to their fallen comrade.

You can see a video of the unfinished mural below:

Credit: George Kelly / Youtube

Do you think art can be used to decrease violence? Like our Facebook page to stay up to date on stories like this that impact the Latino community.

This Vogue Exhibit — Featuring A Gorgeous Portrait Of Yalitza Aparicio — Is Now Open In Mexico City

Fierce

This Vogue Exhibit — Featuring A Gorgeous Portrait Of Yalitza Aparicio — Is Now Open In Mexico City

@yalitzaapariciomtz / Instagram

Any designer will tell you that art and fashion often go hand-in-hand. Through the ages, art has reflected so much about society and history solely through the clothing and architecture depicted by oils and pastels. From the runways of Paris and Milan to the pages of VOGUE, the composition, color, and forms of the latest fashions often show us that they are equivalent to the most iconic works of art created by the most masterful fine artists.

Now, Vogue is yet again showing us the relationship between art and fashion with its brand new “Vogue Like a Painting” exhibit.

Twitter / @mamiyolis

The exhibition is being shown at Mexico City’s historic Franz Mayer Museum from now until September 15, 2019. The sample of 65 images is a representation of the greatest photographs to manifest in VOGUE during its past 20 years as a publication.  The magazine’s archives were thoroughly examined to find the most impactful, most artistically composed and most striking pictures to be taken by photographers during their time at VOGUE.

Over the last two decades, some of the most iconic photographers ever have collaborated with the publication. Annie Leibovitz, Paolo Roversi, Tim Walker, Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, Steven Klein, Sheila Metzner, Cecil Beaton, and Edward Steichen are some of the many big name artists who have captured moments for VOGUE. They have contributed easily some of the most recognizable images that the magazine has printed and their work will be available to view at the “Vogue Like a Painting” event.

Karla Martinez de Salas, editorial director of Vogue Mexico and Latin America, had this to say about the art exhibition:

“I have always believed in the power of images, in that inexplicable magic of telling stories without words that allow us to inspire and make us dream. From a painting signed by Goya, to an image photographed by Tim Walker or Paolo Roversi, it is these beautiful visual records of fashion and culture that are truly treasured in our memory and heart.”

What all of these images have in common are distinct characteristics that are traditionally attributed to paintings and other works of fine art.

Twitter / @museofranzmayer

Their narratives, details and subject matter are approached the same way a master would address a canvas. At first glance, some of these pictures don’t even look like photographs. The stylistic techniques used to capture the subject are implemented as authentically as possible — staying true to the artistic elements artists are trained in.

The compositions also invoke comparisons to different artists and art periods. Split into genres like portraiture and landscapes, artistic movements like Renaissance painting, Rococo art, and even Pre-Raphaelite works are mirrored by these photos. The images in “Vogues Like a Painting” evoke masters such as Magritte, Degas, Dalí, Botticelli and Zurbarán. Their use of light, space, color and figure drawing are mimicked by the pictures on display — making these pieces completely at home in the museum.

Of these breath-taking pictures, a gorgeous portrait of Yalitza Aparicio can also be viewed.

Twitter / @VogueMexico

This image of Yalitza Aparicio comes from a spread by the photographers Santiago & Mauricio and was published back in January 2019. The actress was the first Indigenous woman to appear on the cover of VOGUE. Displayed in the “Vogue Like a Painter” exhibit, the portrait draws comparisons to Da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa.” The steady stare, the use of light and dark and the positioning of her body is reminiscent of the mysterious woman in the Italian master’s piece. We can even see the influence of Frida Kahlo’s self-portraits reflected in the photograph of the “Roma” star.

Debbie Smith, the curator of the “Vogue Like a Picture” exhibit spoke with VOGUE MEXICO about the inclusion of Aparicio’s portrait and how historic the actress’ fashion shoot was for the magazine, fashion and art.

“I was so shocked by the cover of Yalitza, it ‘s one of the most important things that Vogue has done in recent decades … It was impeccable. I have the file saved in my mind.”

As if these beautiful pictures weren’t enough, the exhibition also includes two dresses by Alexander McQueen — one of them never before displayed — as well as another three gowns by Comme des Garçons, Christian Lacroix and Nina Ricci. These pieces were borrowed especially for the “Vogue Like a Painting” exhibit. If you can get to Mexico City for this show, definitely give it a look. It is without a doubt one of the most historic mixtures of art and fashion to be seen today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twdG7xRE2TY

These Tattoo Fails Failed So Hard They Might Actually Be Winning

Culture

These Tattoo Fails Failed So Hard They Might Actually Be Winning

tatuajesxd / Instagram

Tattoos are so symbolic, that it’s not hard to figure out what is really important to the people who have them. For Latinos, it’s a perfect way to show our connection to our roots, our love for our culture and the pride of being who we are and of the people that came before us.

Obviously, there is an enormous well of inspiration in our folklore and ancestral art.

But what happens when you have a tattoo fail?

Let’s hope this is still a work in progress…

Credit: tatuajesxd / Instagram

Loteria card tattoos are popping up everywhere and they can be great but you got to do it right. Hopefully, this is just the first session and it’s on its way to looking gorgeous.

El Señor Nippleriño

Credit: worst-tattoo-ever.tumblr.com

Come on…there has to be a better way to pay homage to the humble yet iconic sombrereo?!

This samurai may just cut off that nipple…

Credit: worst-tattoo-ever.tumblr.com

Come on people! Nipple placement! How are people not paying attention to this very important detail?

No hair? No problem!

Credit: pinknightmare.com

We’ll just throw on some copyrighted Louis Vuitton monogram and ya – problem solved!

And a trend that seems to be growing: face tattoos.

Credit: pinknightmare.com

Just what is even happening here? Who is he? Why on your face? What is the whole truth?!

We weren’t totally sure to include this Brazilian artist’s work on the list…

Credit: Malfeitona / Instagram

Because “ugly tattoos” are kinda her jam. She prides herself on providing tatuagens peba, which translates to ugly tattoos. And although she can’t draw, people are all about her original ideas and less than perfect drawing skills.

Not only has the tattoo artist gone viral for it, but she’s also managed to build a successful business with dozens of 5-star reviews from happy customers, as well as over 12 thousand Instagram followers.

OK, I didn’t know Timon and Pumbaa could be cute and ugly at the same time.

Credit: Malfeitona / Instagram

Like yea…it looks like a 4-year-old drew it but hey apparently there are thousands of people into it.

Also, aren’t stars like one of the earliest things we all learn to draw?

Credit: Malfeitona / Instagram

Stars are simple! Why does it look like this? But you keep doing you girl.

With this tattoo the idea is cute but it just didn’t really work out…

Credit: tatuajesxd / Instagram

Like seriously, love the idea. But that concha looks kinda off, the font – mmm no.

Memorializing the iconic pollo on a stick.

Credit: tatuajesxd / Instagram

This pollo on a lollipop falls into that same category: good on paper but just didn’t quite turn out the way we hoped.

And I know, who doesn’t love a taco tattoo?

Credit: wiltattooer / Instagram

Well…me. At least no this one.

This little taco is almost too cute to include on this list but it just wasn’t giving us that polished tattoo look we need in a good tattoo.

We’re not sure that their tattoo artist achieved the desired effect…

Credit: iamboigenius.com

But ya calalte…nobody tell them the truth.

Apparently, we Latinos really have a thing for putting designer brands all over our bodies – permanently.

Credit: pinknightmare.com

At least the tattoo artist actually put the right initials…

READ: These Latina Tattoo Artists Know How To Give The Best Ink In The Business

Paid Promoted Stories