Entertainment

Remake Of Classic Television Show Means More Latinos On Netflix

CREDIT: NETFLIX US & CANADA / YOUTUBE

The trailer for the upcoming Latino reboot of “One Day At A Time” was just released, and Netflix obviously spared no expense bringing the family to life. “One Day At A Time” follows three generations of a Cuban family, from abuela to the millennial teenagers, trying to live together in harmony under the same roof. More often than not, however, clashes between generations lead to tried and true sitcom misunderstandings and laughs. For anyone who grew up in a “Latino” household, the jokes might feel a little too familiar, but this is exactly why producers were attracted to this reboot.

Of the mostly Latino cast, executive producer Norman Lear told The Hollywood Reporter, “I just love the idea because I don’t see enough of that representation on the air anyplace.”

screen-shot-2016-12-07-at-3-53-32-pm
CREDIT: NETFLIX US & CANADA / YOUTUBE

“One Day At A Time” features newcomers Isabella Gomez and Marcel Ruiz as the children as well as veteran actor Justina Machado as their mother. Oscar winner Rita Moreno plays the Cuban-born grandmother, Lydia. Several producers were pulled from other successful shows, such as “How I Met Your Mother,” but the the biggest Hollywood name on board is easily Norman Lear, who created the original show in 1975. Lear, as fans remember, is arguably one the most innovative figures television history, creating the classics “All In The Family,” “Sanford and Son,” and “The Jeffersons.” “One Day At A Time” originally ran for nine seasons, and was praised for its portrayal of a single mother trying to make the most out of life for her and her children.

Over the last few years, Netflix has become the go-to place for TV remakes.

screen-shot-2016-12-07-at-1-00-18-pm
CREDIT: NETFLIX US & CANADA / YOUTUBE

Netflix has worked hard to bring cult classics back to life, like “Arrested Development,” “Fuller House,” and most recently “Gilmore Girls.” Some remakes have been duds, but for the most part fans have binged watch their nostalgic favorites and demanded more. The Latino version of “One Day At A Time” was originally announced in January of 2015, but whether or not fans will flock to the reimagined version of the show remains to be seen. The 13-episode season is set to air starting Jan. 6, 2017 on Netflix.

READ: Here Are A Few Surprises From Pixar’s Upcoming “Coco” Movie

Like this story? Click on the share button below to send to your friends. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Cuban-Americans Are Reaffirming Their Commitment To The GOP In 2020

Things That Matter

Cuban-Americans Are Reaffirming Their Commitment To The GOP In 2020

Alex Villalba / Getty Images

Few things are for certain when it comes to Latino voters. One of those certainties is that Cuban-Americans, unlike other Latino groups, are loyal to the Republican Party. So loyal that they are still giving their unwavering support in the Trump era.

A new study shows that Cuban-Americans are largely falling in line with Trump’s Republican Party.

Out of all of the Latino voters, Cubans have always been a reliable voting bloc for the Republican Party. Their vote has been important in winning Florida, a key swing state that has decided elections in the past. Over the past four years, Cuban support for the GOP has remained steady despite the younger generation of Cubans leaning Democratic.

“Historically, Cuban Americans have backed the Republican Party in large numbers, but that support has at times softened as a new generation of U.S.-born, Democratic-leaning Cubans has come of age,” reads the Pew Research Center article. “In 2013, similar shares of Cuban registered voters identified with the Republican Party (47 percent) and the Democratic Party (44 percent). That same year, 60 percent of non-Cuban Hispanic voters identified as Democratic and 28 percent as Republican.”

Cubans are the most politically active community in the Latino demographic.

According to the study, Cubans are more likely to vote than other Latino groups. Fifty-eight percent of eligible Cuban voters voted in 2016 compared to 55 percent of Dominicans, 49 percent of Salvadorans, 46 percent of Puerto Ricans, and 44 percent of Mexicans.

According to the Census Bureau, most Cuban voters (55 percent) in the U.S. are naturalized citizens. This means that most Cuban voters in the U.S. were born in Cuba and are voting with that mentality.

Cubans, however, are voting against their own interest when it comes to healthcare.

Credit: Pew Research Center

According to the study, Cubans, like other Latinos, do believe that healthcare is an important issue. However, their vote for the Republican Party further places healthcare out of reach for millions of Americans. While Cubans claim that healthcare is an important issue, the Trump administration is suing to overturn the Affordable Care Act, which gives millions of Americans access to healthcare.

The 2020 elections are heating up and Florida is a key state in the road to the White House.

People are watching this election closely. Record numbers of people have already gone to vote early. Millions of people are voting in mail-in and early voting to secure a future they want to see for the country.

READ: Latino Voters Could Decide The 2020 Election, So Why Did Only 5 Presidential Candidates Show Up To A Latino Issues Forum?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

It’s Finally Justina Machado’s Time to Shine

Entertainment

It’s Finally Justina Machado’s Time to Shine

Photo: Getty Images

On Monday, beloved (and not to mention, underrated) actress Justina Machado sat down for a wide-ranging interview with the Los Angeles Times.

In it, Machado covers everything from her lengthy career, to the sad state of Latinx representation in Hollywood, to the offensive phone call she had with a tone-deaf TV exec in the ’90s.

Finally, after almost 25 years of hard work in Hollywood, Machado is dominating America’s Monday nights with two high-profile gigs: a spot on “Dancing With the Stars” and the return of “One Day At a Time” to CBS after it was unceremoniously dropped by Netflix.

Naturally, with so much on her plate, the Puerto Rican actress in not only mentally, but physically exhausted. After all, “Dancing With the Stars” is notorious for its grueling practice and shoot schedules. “Every day when I come home, my routine is dunking my feet in [an ice bath],” she told the LA Times. “The first week and a half of rehearsals, forget about it–I was crying.”

But Machado is glad that she took the DWTS opportunity for what it means in terms of Latinx representation on network television.

“The thing about ‘Dancing With the Stars’ is it reaches so many more homes than [‘One Day at a Time’]…,” she told the publication. “I know they’ve had Latinas on the show, but they need a whole lot more. And so I was like, ‘I’m going to do that. I’m going to be that Puerto Rican woman that’s on that show.’”

Throughout the interview, Machado gets candid about what it’s like to be a Latina in the American entertainment industry–which is an unforgiving business.

She described the beginning of her career as plagued by insecurity. Before she began a professional acting career, Machado was convinced she couldn’t make it as an actor because professional acting “wasn’t a part of [her] world.” “Nobody was an actor in Chicago that I knew, in my neighborhood, in the inner city of Chicago,” she explained.

After she finally established her footing in Hollywood, she was then met with further doors slammed in her face in the form of racism and anti-Latino sentiment.

Like when an executive called her to tell her why her TV show wasn’t moving forward, back in the ’90s.

“He literally called my house, nice man… and said, ‘My God, your pilot is so great. Everybody loves you, everybody. But we don’t think America is ready for a Latino family.’”

What’s depressing about this story is that Latino representation onscreen still hasn’t gotten much better over 20 years later. But Machado is hopeful that the tides of change are turning

“That was acceptable for him to say…Like, what? And that was the ’90s! And look at today. How many Latino families do you see on television? So America better get ready because we’re here. We’re here.” We know that if Machado has anything to do with the future of TV, we’ll be seeing Latino families more and more often.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com