Entertainment

Beautifully Weird People You Only Find at Neon Desert

You run into a variety of people at music festivals – some eccentric and others just plain weird. But there’s nothing like the crowd at Neon Desert in El Paso, Texas. Check out the unique crowd that showed up at the fifth anniversary of this music festival…

Mr. and Mrs. Psychedelic

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Photo Credit: Sarah Savedra

They time travelled from the 70s just to make it to Neon Desert.

It’s Not Neon without Amigo Man

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It’s not Neon Desert without that Ray of Sunshine.

Superheroes Magically Appear

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…even if their cape is a towel and holds no superpowers.

The Confused Festivalgoer

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Photo Credit: Sarah Savedra

Sorry man, this is Neon, not Coachella. Coachella is overrated anyway.

Multitasking Athletes

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Can you hula hoop, roller skate AND jam to your J.Cole? Didn’t think so.

READ: 13 Dishes El Pasoans Can’t Get Enough Of

Derby Girls!

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Photo Credit: Sarah Savedra

One of many perks of having the festival on a street – you can rollerblade stage to stage.

That Weirdo We Warned You About

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Photo Credit: Sarah Savedra

He’s weird and he knows it.

The One Who Gives No F*cks

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Photo Credit: Sarah Savedra

You do you, boo… I guess.

There’s Old-Timers, Too

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Photo Credit: Sarah Savedra

Because you’re never too old to jam to Cypress Hill.

Those Who Never Turn Down

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In Missy Elliot’s words, “get ya freak on!”

The Die-Hard Fan

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Photo Credit: Sarah Savedra

He risks everything for a birdseye view.

Rasta Man!

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Good vibes all around. Ja feel me, man?

Real Life Pixies

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Livin’ that hoop lyfe.

Sweet Cuddlers in Search of Love

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Is that what they call it these days? No thanks.

Those Who Make Neon Desert, Neon

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Photo Credit: Sarah Savedra

Sweet kicks, bro.

One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

Things That Matter

One Year Later, The Latino Community Remembers The El Paso Shooting

Mario Tama / Getty Images

On August 3, 2019, a man entered a Walmart in El Paso, Texas and killed 23 customers and injured 23 more. The shooter, Patrick Crusius, went to the Walmart with the expressed purpose of killing Mexican and Mexican-Americans. One year later, the community is remembering those lost.

One year ago today, a man killed 23 people in an El Paso Walmart targeting our community.

The Latino community was stunned when Patrick Crusius opened fire and killed 23 people in El Paso, Texas. The gunman wrote a manifesto and included his desire to kill as many Mexicans and Mexican-Americans he could in the El Paso Walmart. The days after were filled with grieving the loss of 23 people and trying to understand how this kind of hate could exist in our society.

Representative Veronica Escobar, who represents El Paso, is honoring the victims today.

Rep. Escobar was on the scene shortly after the shooting to be there for her community. The shooting was a reminder of the dangers of the anti-Latino and xenophobic rhetoric that the Trump administration was pushing for years.

“One year ago, our community and the nation were shocked and heartbroken by the horrific act of domestic terrorism fueled by racism and xenophobia that killed 23 beautiful souls, injured 22, and devasted all of us,” Rep. Escobar said in a statement. “Today will be painful for El Pasoans, especially for the survivors and the loved ones of those who were killed, but as we grieve and heal together apart, we must continue to face hate with love and confront xenophobia by treating the stranger with dignity and hospitality.”

El Pasoans are coming together today to remember the victims of the violence that day.

Latinos are a growing demographic that will soon eclipse the white communities in several states. Some experts in demographic shifts understand that this could be a terrifying sign for the white population. These changing demographics give life to racist and hateful ideologies.

“When you have a few people of color, the community is not seen so much as a threat,” Maria Cristina Morales, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Texas at El Paso, told USA Today about the fear of changing demographics. “But the more that the population grows – the population of Latinos grow for instance – the more fear that there’s going to be a loss of power.”

The international attack is still felt today because of the constant examples of white supremacy still active today.

“It doesn’t occur to you that there’s a war going on, and there’s always been a war going on—the helicopters the barbed wire—but you just kind of didn’t see it,” David Dorado Romo, an El Paso historian who lost a friend in the shooting, told Time Magazine.

The sudden reminder of the hate out there towards the Latino community was felt nationwide that day. The violent attack that was planned out revealed the true cost of that hate that has been pushed by some politicians.

“El Paso families have the right to live free from fear, and I will continue to honor the victims and survivors with action,” Rep. Escobar said in her statement. “Fighting to end the gun violence and hate epidemics that plague our nation.”

READ: As El Paso Grieves Their Loss, Here Is Everything We Know About The Victims Of The El Paso Massacre, Which Were Mostly Latino

The Premios Juventud 2020 Line Up Is Going To Be The Perfect Escape From Our Collective Reality

Entertainment

The Premios Juventud 2020 Line Up Is Going To Be The Perfect Escape From Our Collective Reality

Ethan Miller / Getty Images

Premios Juventud 2020 is not going virtual, like most other major events. Instead, the awards show is going to be held in-person but with a virtual audience. Here’s who you can expect to take the stage this year.

The Premios Juventud 2020 is going on as planned, just with a virtual audience.

The awards show is celebrating its 20th year this year and the show is going on. The show is being aired from Miami, one of the worst-hit areas in the country for Covid-19, but the show promises to follow all safety standards based on local health guidelines. Here are some of the people you can expect to perform.

Natanael Cana

Cana will be giving corridos tumbados some massive exposure at the awards show. The genre of music is an exciting mix of corridos with trap and urban influences. The sound is something else and fans are excited to see the genre given some love on the stage.

CNCO

The boy band CNCO has become a beloved addition to Latin music. The group was formed after the first season of “La Banda,” a music competition show looking for the hottest new sound. Safe to say that the show’s judges did a good job putting this group together.

Rafa Pabön

Pabön is a major voice of Conciencia Collective and Black Lives Matter. The musician released a song called “Sine Aire” after the George Floyd protests that brought Black Lives Matter to the forefront of American culture. Conciencia Collective hosts weekly talks with We Are Mitú promoting advocacy in the music industry.

And, of course, host Sebastián Yatra.

Yatra will be joined on stage with Danna Paola to perform their duet “No Bailes Sola.” The awards show will definitely be a nice escape from our collective Covid reality. There might not be any fans at the show but the performers are all ready to give a great show to the virtual audience.

READ: A Growing Number Of Celebs Have Tested Positive For Covid-19, Reminding Us All We’re Still In The Middle Of A Pandemic