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The Documentary ‘Nana’ is Showing How Far Mothers Go to Care for Their Children

Tatiana Fernández Geara / Nana

Imagine going years without seeing your mother and knowing she’s in a different country taking care of other people’s children. That is the truth for lots of children in the Dominican Republic. Nana, a documentary by Tatiana Fernández Geara, explores the heartbreaking journey Dominican nannies must take so they can send money to their children back home.

The documentary focuses on the Dominican women who work as nannies in the US.

Not With My Children
Credit: Tatiana Fernandez Geara / YouTube

The women are usually hired to be live-in nannies by affluent families the U.S. Some, like Clara, go several years without seeing their own children and end up becoming surrogate parents for the children they nanny.

One of the mothers in Nana says she had no choice but to leave her children behind in search of better opportunity.

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Credit: Tatiana Fernandez Geara / YouTube

“I have to work to support them,” Fina says in the documentary. “Or have everyone starve to death back home. It’s one or the other.”

READ: A New Documentary Tells the Story of Latinas Who Were Sterilized Without Knowing It

Despite finding better paying jobs, the mothers constantly worry about their own children.

Eating
Credit: Tatiana Fernandez Geara / YouTube

“Sometimes you’re eating and you don’t know if your kids have eaten,” says Leidy, one of the nannies featured in the doc. The nannies must rely on their family members back home to care for their children.

Leidy’s two children are back in San Juan, DR where they are being looked after by their grandmother.

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Credit: Tatiana Fernandez Geara / YouTube

Leidy’s grandmother says she’s used to it. “The only grandkids I haven’t raised are the ones in San Francisco,” Leidy’s grandmother says. “I’ve had up to 12 grandkids at once here in this shack.”

Back in the US, the nannies form such a strong bond with the children they take care of, that the kids see them as their own mothers.

Leidy
Credit: Tatiana Fernandez Geara / YouTube

“I feel like Leidy is my mom and I feel like mom is Leidy,” says one of the children being taken care of by Leidy.

Their choice to raise other people’s children has brought up some questions about motherly love.

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Credit: Tatiana Fernandez Geara / YouTube

“It would be love, dedication, devotion,” Fina says in response to the question. “And many other things.”

READ: A Documentary Shows There’s More than Two Sides to the Mexican Drug War

And despite being so far from their kids, they still think motherly love is a beautiful thing.

Beautiful Feeling
Credit: Tatiana Fernandez Geara / YouTube

“The most beautiful feeling.”

You can check out the full trailer below:

Credit: Tatiana Fernandez Geara / YouTube

(H/T: Remezcla)

Did you find the story interesting? Share it with your friends so they get a chance to see a different form of motherhood.

This 81-Year-Old Abuela Just Gave Us Serious #GrownUpGoals

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This 81-Year-Old Abuela Just Gave Us Serious #GrownUpGoals

Credit: Caleb Kerr / El Paso Times / Cosmopolitan

Who signs up for the Beer Mile where you have to drink a lot of beer while running a mile?  81-year-old Elvira  Montes from El Paso, that’s who!

It’s actually her second time running the FloTrack Beer Mile World Championships, but she didn’t enjoy the first time because “I’m not a big beer drinker,” Montes said. “I like beer when the weather is real hot and there’s nothing else to drink. I’m really a scotch drinker, Chivas if it’s available. If it was scotch we were drinking instead of beer, I would have run a lot faster.” There’s an idea.

READ: Moments You Know are Too Real If You Were Raised By Abuelita

Vera, who runs three miles four times a week, was the oldest runner in the race. And she beat her daughter Renee, a marathon runner, coming in at 20 minutes vs her daughter’s 21 minutes.

Maybe, if there’s scotch next year, she’ll beat everyone.

Read more about Vera in the El Paso Times here.

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