#mitúWORLD

Must Watch: Colombian Man Scales Up Balcony To Rescue Dog

Credit/ Viralhub/YouTube

Who knew that Spider-Man was Colombian?

Straight up, we have no idea how the poor dog found itself hanging from the balcony, why the owners weren’t around, or when this act of bravery actually took place.

What we can tell you is that according to internet — Reddit and these two articles we found on the matter — is that it took place somewhere in Colombia. What we can also tell you is that holy crap, how brave is that dude for going all Peter Parker on us and saving the poor frightened pooch? Also, was it just us, or did you also expect “Circle of Life” to start playing after our mystery hero saves the dog from a splish-splashy death?

READ: 2-Legged Vato Finds 3-Legged Puppy, Falls in Love

Are you a pet lover who finds videos of people going out of their way to save a furry friend? If so, click the share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

There’s A Reason This Brutally Honest Adoption Ad For A ‘Demonic Man-Hating Chihuahua’ Named Prancer Went Viral

Things That Matter

There’s A Reason This Brutally Honest Adoption Ad For A ‘Demonic Man-Hating Chihuahua’ Named Prancer Went Viral

Adopter be ware.

That’s the message that a desperate New Jersey foster mom shared in a recent plea to animal lovers potentially interested in adopting a Chihuahua named Prancer. In a viral post shared on Facebook, animal foster mom Tyfanee Fortuna attempted to make an appeal to adopters on behalf of the dog whom she describes as a “haunted Victorian child in the body of a small dog that hates men and children.”

The post didn’t take long to go viral.

In a shockingly honest post, Fortuna spoke on the personality traits of the dog named Prancer on social media.

“There’s not a very big market for neurotic, man-hating, animal-hating, children-hating dogs that look like gremlins,” Fortuna underlined in the post shared to Facebook. “But I have to believe there’s someone out there for Prancer, because I am tired and so is my family. Every day we live in the grips of the demonic Chihuahua hellscape he has created in our home.”

It didn’t take long for Fortuna’s comedic Facebook post about Prance to amass nearly 64K shares.

“Prancer only likes women. Nothing else,” another portion of the post explained. “He hates men more than women do, which says a lot. If you have a husband don’t bother applying, unless you hate him.”

Smitten viewers of the post who were interested in Prancer were thankfully quick to request a chance to adopt him.

https://twitter.com/HLMongoose/status/1380505940265463818/photo/4

“We are still accepting applicants who are within a 3- to 4-hour radius of New Jersey, as we are still sifting through applications and trying to pick out his best fit,” Fortuna explained to Today in an interview. “A lot of people have applied who have husbands and pets, and we’d prefer he go to a home with just women and no other pets.”

Fortuna works as foster mom for the Oak Ridge, New Jersey-based Second Chance Pet Adoption League and is hopeful that someone will help Prancer find a suitable and loving home. 

WhileFortuna was sure to underline some of Prancer’s more intense traits, she also listed those that plenty would find loveable.

“He is loyal beyond belief, although to tell you a secret his complex is really just a facade for his fear. If someone tried to kill you I can guarantee he would run away screeching. But as far as companionship, you will never be alone again,” she wrote of the sweetie. “He likes to go for car rides, he is housebroken, he knows a few basic commands, he is quiet and non-destructive when left alone at home, and even though we call him bologna face he is kind of cute to look at.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Nicole Chapaval Advocates For More Latinas In Tech Through Teaching App Platzi

Fierce

Nicole Chapaval Advocates For More Latinas In Tech Through Teaching App Platzi

The gender disparity in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) jobs remains wide in Colombia. As of 2019, Colombian women hold 32.9 percent of all STEM jobs in the country.

Nicole Chapaval, the VP of education at Platzi, wants to get more women into STEM. As someone who found herself in tech, Chapaval understands what it takes for women to break into the industry.

Chapaval’s own passion for computer science started in her youth. Despite wanting her parents’ reservations about her career choice, she went to school to study software engineering.

“I learned how to code with Platzi. I was a student back in 2012 before I worked here,” she told mitú.

Platzi is a professional learning app targeting people ages 22 and older.

Photo courtesy of Apple

Instructors for the app are teaching livestream courses on programming, marketing, design, and business. The classes are available in English and Spanish.

Chapaval took an interest in content optimization practicing her coding on a personal blog while taking online courses. Starting out as a student advocate, the two founders of Platzi noticed her dedication and started to involve her more in the team.

As Platzi expanded, so did Chapaval’s job description.

Chapaval has been successful in her career. Yet, despite the success, she has seen the gender disparity firsthand. It has only further inspired Chavapal to work to get more women in their tech careers.

“One of my first jobs was in a company that was doing mobile applications and in this company there were 15 male developers and myself,” she says.

Wanting to engage with her male colleagues, Chapaval admitted to feeling weird when her enthusiasm was not reciprocated.

“I was always very extroverted and wanted to meet everyone [but] they didn’t want to talk with me,” she says.

Chapaval teaches 60 percent of computer sciences courses hoping to attract more women to the field.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“I think that representation is very important. So I try to be very vocal and very present with everything that we do in social media and in content creation,” she says.

Whether it be attending company livestreams or podcasts, it is imperative for Chapaval to have women witness others in the field to show the possibilities they can achieve.

Prideful, she also amplifies the achievements of other Latinas in STEM, like that of Diana Trujillo. Yet, she still expresses a need for more women to get managerial roles.

“I am very proud of Trujillo,” she says. “She’s from my hometown and she was in the NASA project that launched the Perseverance Rover. These kinds of things are great!”

Thirty-six percent of Platzi‘s more than 1 million students are women and it is growing.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“That’s very low,” she says, “but we doubled that percentage from 2018 so we still have a long way to go.”

A key step needed to attract more students is accessibility, both financially and in content. Platzi, Chapaval mentions, offers free programming courses that aim to be accessible to those with low internet connection in all parts of Colombia and Latin America.

It’s not just about what you are learning as an individual, but also as a team or a group,” she says. “That also adds to the working ecosystem of Latin America.”

Regardless of gender, age, or background, Chapaval believes “education is very important if we want to break these blockers.”

In fact, two crucial skills she believes everyone should know is programming and English. “I like to say that both skills have to do with communications; communication with machines and with other people in the world,” she says.

In a time when remote jobs are pertinent due to the pandemic, having communication skills is a valuable asset for STEM careers in any country.

“Programming should be a basic skill that schools teach as well because it’s not only [beneficial] to be a developer,” Chapaval says. “It helps you understand how to solve problems in a logical way.”

Chapaval is grateful for her personal growth in STEM and hopes that Platzi can help others grow.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“I hope [students] can create what they dream of with the coding skills that they can get with us and can show it to the world,” she says.

“Latin America is a lovely region and a lot is happening here,” she says. “I hope that if this community can get to know each other and create the next big companies and big solutions for problems that we have right now, I would [be] fulfilled.”

As the gender disparity in STEM slowly expands, Chapaval continues to vouch for women to speak up and push through in the field.

Proudly Chapaval says, “Latinas are very extroverted, and the tech and software engineering world needs more extroverted people [like us] to add to their ecosystem.”

The App Store featured Platzi for Women’s History Month.

Read: She Came As A Teen From Colombia With Only $300 To Her Name, Now She’s a Director For NASA

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com