things that matter

World In Shock After Ruthless Murder And Graphic Photos Are Leaked

Credit: @angiepotz / Twitter

The murder of a young family in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico on the night of January 29 has shocked the world and many are taking to social media to denounce the extreme violence.

Juan Alberto Pano Ramos, 24, his 7-month-old son Marcos Miguel Pano Colón and  17-year-old Alba Isabel Colón were gunned down while stepping out of a store in Pinopeta Nacional, Oaxaca. It’s not yet known why they were killed or if it was drug or gang related.

A picture of the family has gone viral and shows the mom hunched over surrounded by blood splatters, the dad on the ground with a bloody, white t-shirt, while his son is cradled between his torso and his left arm, almost in the same position as the 3-year-old Syrian refugee, Aylan Kurdi, who washed up on Turkish shores after drowning; his death highlights the plight of Syrian refugees.

Cartoonist Rafael Pineda Rapé created the following image to bring light to the violence:

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Credit: RapéMonero / Facebook

On February 8, three suspects, Juan Antonio Lopez Lopez, Arturo Arzate Vargas and Oscar Silver Idael Olmedo Lopez, were detained during a night raid according to the Oaxaca State’s Attorney’s Office.

Still, social media is outraged and #PinotepaNacional has been trending denouncing the gruesome murder:

Credit: @sammiiwatts / Twitter
Credit: @stefannobalocco / Twitter

https://twitter.com/angieprotz/status/694376693184638977/photo/1

Credit: @angieprotz / Twitter
Credit: @vivianlyzette / Twitter
Credit: @legitimategeek / Twitter

Read more about the story at NBC News here.

READ: 6 Things More Important than El Chapo in Mexico’s Drug War

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How Gay Weddings And Honeymoons Could Be The Answer To Puerto Rico’s Problems

things that matter

How Gay Weddings And Honeymoons Could Be The Answer To Puerto Rico’s Problems

Credit: iStock

La Isla del Encanto, or Puerto Rico as most of us know it, is going through a crippling financial crisis thanks to a $70 billion debt. The solution? Some are banking on gay tourism. Yup.

Lee Hall, who got engaged to his boyfriend on the island, says, “Everyone here, that I’ve experienced, is very gay friendly, gay accepting.” Unlike other islands in the Caribbean that traditionally follow the conservative rulings of the British, Puerto Rico abides by the same gay laws in the U.S. This means that being gay won’t land you a life sentence like it does in Barbados or in a mental asylum like in Dominica — a huge advantage for any openly gay people who want to travel to the Caribbean.

READ: Mexican Soccer Player Says He’s Not Gay, But if He Was, You Shouldn’t Care

Cecilia de la Luz, a gay activist, has been fighting for gay rights for more than 40 years, and advocates for gay rights on the island because it will improve the quality of life for everyone, not just gay people.

“There’s a connection between more rights for gay people in Puerto Rico and have more impact in regards to gay tourism on the island and that will have a domino effect in regards to improve the economy,” she says.

To no one’s surprise, 90 percent of the tourism on the island comes from the U.S. and of that percentage, gay honeymooners spend a lot more money than their straight counterparts. Ingrid Rivera, executive director of the Puerto Rico Tourism Company says that the island is a great wedding destination. Because of this, the government is pushing U.S. airlines to have more direct flights to the island and even has commercials geared towards the gay community. Although there are no hard numbers in terms of how much gay tourism can generate for the island, Rivera estimates it at 350 to 500 million.

Tropical island gay weddings and debt reduction? Boom. It’s a #winwin.

Listen to more details about gay tourism in Puerto Rico from NPR’s Latino USA here.

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