Entertainment

Miguel Aguilar Could Have Been Deported but Now He’s a Pro Soccer Player

Miguel Aguilar is a rookie midfielder for D.C. United of Major League Soccer. 

Disappointing result but what an experience and pleasure it was to play at Yankee Stadium last night. #DCU #NextOne

A photo posted by Miguel Aguilar (@migue.an17) on

Aguilar is also the first Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient to sign a major league sports contract. 

Aguilar and his family left El Paso and headed to California. 

Few minutes late but before I go to sleep I want to wish my mom a happy bday, I love you ma #myrock

A photo posted by Miguel Aguilar (@migue.an17) on

Aguilar was a high school star on the pitch, but he would often come home to an empty home. 

See you soon ??

A photo posted by Miguel Aguilar (@migue.an17) on

Thanks to his soccer coaches, Aguilar turned the corner academically his junior year and never looked back. 

Tbt to graduation ?? #USFCA #Homies

A photo posted by Miguel Aguilar (@migue.an17) on

He was MLS bound after a stellar career with the Dons. 

Is it fall yet? #Golazo #Futbol #Falliscoming

A photo posted by Miguel Aguilar (@migue.an17) on

Aguilar gained legal status two and a half years ago under DACA. 

Flew from CA to DC just to see me, love you. #DC #WhiteHouse #Tourists

A photo posted by Miguel Aguilar (@migue.an17) on

But being a pro athlete doesn’t get Aguilar through customs any faster when he’s at the airport. 

To the first game of the season and my debut in the MLS. @dcunited #throwback #DCU #VamosUnited

A photo posted by Miguel Aguilar (@migue.an17) on

Credit: @migue.an17 / Instagram

When Aguilar travels abroad with D.C. United, he carries a Mexican passport and special work permit. Despite the paperwork, Aguilar sometimes gets stuck at airports for hours. One time, Aguilar was delayed for so long that he missed a team flight after returning from a match in Costa Rica.

Sometimes, his status has affected his pro career.

❤️⚽️

A photo posted by Miguel Aguilar (@migue.an17) on

Aguilar says he’s not sure which soccer national team he’d play for – Mexico or the US – if given the opportunity. 

Miguel Aguilar
Credit: dcunited.com

“I still feel my roots are in Mexico, but it’s close,” Aguilar told the Washington Post. “My love for the sport, it all started in Mexico, but here is where I realized my dream.”

Even with all the soccer success, Aguilar still finds time to give back to his community.

Credit: The Sacramento Bee / YouTube

Earlier this year, Aguilar visited students at his alma mater, Encina High School to encourage them to pursue their dreams. “Never forget where you come from. That’s one of the things that has stuck with me,” said Aguilar to The Sacramento Bee.

After rough times in in Juárez, Miguel Aguilar and his family are living the American dream. 

Playing tourist for the day #Lincoln #DCU

A photo posted by Miguel Aguilar (@migue.an17) on

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Report Shows That Immigration Narratives On TV Are Latinx-Focused And Over-Emphasize Crime

Entertainment

Report Shows That Immigration Narratives On TV Are Latinx-Focused And Over-Emphasize Crime

The media advocacy group Define American recently released a study that focused on the way immigrant characters are depicted on television. The second-annual study is entitled “Change the Narrative, Change the World”.

Although the study reports progress in some areas of onscreen representation, there is still a long way to go.

For example, the study reported that half of the immigrant characters depicted on television are Latino, which is consistent with reality. What is not consistent with reality, however, is how crime-related storylines are still an overrepresented theme in these storylines.

The study shows that on television 22% of immigrant characters have crime storylines show up as part of their narratives. These types of storylines further pedal the false narrative that immigrants are criminals, when in reality, they’re just everyday people who are trying to lives their best lives. Ironically, this statistic is an improvement on the previous year’s statistics in which crime themes made up 34% of immigrants’ stories on TV.

These numbers are further proof that the media feels stories of Latino immigration have to be about sadness and hardship in order to be worth watching.

According to Define American’s website, their organization believes that “powerful storytelling is the catalyst that can reshape our country’s immigration narrative and generate significant cultural change.”

They believe that changing the narratives depicted in entertainment media can “reshape our country’s immigration narrative and generate significant cultural change.” 

“We wanted to determine if seeing the specific immigration storylines influenced [viewers’] attitudes, behavior, or knowledge in the real world,” said Sarah Lowe, the associate director of research and impact at Define American to Variety. “And we were reassured and inspired to see the impact it had.” 

Define American’s founder, Jose Antonio Vargas, is relatively optimistic about the study’s outcomes, saying that the report has “some promising findings” and the numbers “provide [him] with hope”. He added that there are still “many areas in which immigrant representation can improve”.

via Getty Images

Namely, Vargas was disappointed in television’s failure to take an intersectional approach to immigration in regards to undocumented Black immigrants. 

“Black undocumented immigrants are detained and deported at higher rates than other ethnic groups,” Vargas told Variety. “But their stories are largely left off-screen and left out of the larger narrative around immigration.” 

“Change the Narrative, Change the World” also showed that Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants are also under-represented on television compared with reality. Also worth noting, male immigrants were over-represented on television compared to reality, while immigrants with disabilities were also under-represented.

The study also showed that when viewers are exposed to TV storylines that humanize immigrants, they’re more likely to take action on immigration issues themselves. 

The effect that fictional entertainment narratives have on viewers further proves that representation does, indeed, matter. What we watch as entertainment changes the way we think about other people’s lived experiences. And that, in turn, can change the world.

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Vanessa Bryant Suing Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Over Leaked Photos Of Kobe And Gianna

Entertainment

Vanessa Bryant Suing Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Over Leaked Photos Of Kobe And Gianna

kobebryant / lacosheriff / Instagram

Vanessa Bryant filed a lawsuit against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department alleging violation of privacy. The lawsuit stems from behavior by the officers at the scene of her husband and daughter’s death.

Vanessa Bryant is suing the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department.

On Jan. 26, a helicopter carrying Kobe and Gianna Bryant, Payton and Sarah Chester, Alyssa, Keri, and John Altobelli, Christina Mauser, and pilot Ara Zobayan crashed in the Calabasas hills. The sudden death devastated those who knew Kobe and the city of Los Angeles that mourned his death for months after.

Vanessa was shocked to hear that the sheriff deputies took photos of her husband’s and daughter’s bodies at the crash site.

“This lawsuit is about accountability and about preventing this disgraceful behavior from happening to other families in the future who have suffered loss,” Vanessa’s attorney, Luis Li, said in a statement. “The department formally refused Mrs. Bryant’s requests for information, saying it was ‘unable to assist’ with any inquiry and had no legal obligation to do so. It’s now for a court to tell the department what its obligations are.”

Bryant is suing the department claiming damages for emotional distress, negligence, and invasion of privacy.

Kobe fans are upset with the LACSD and the allegations that the deputies took these photos.

According to TMZ, Sheriff Alex Villanueva knew about the photos taken by eight deputies and shared within the department. They were also shared in the Lost Hills Sheriff’s substation. Sheriff Villanueva told the deputies to delete the photos from their phones and felt confident they did so.

A trainee allegedly shared the photos with a woman in a bar.

A witness to the event said that a trainee took out his phone and showed a woman the photos to impress her. The bartender overheard the conversation and filed an online complaint about the trainee and their behavior with the photos. The trainee showed the woman the photos a few days after the crash leading many to believe that the sheriff’s department was fully aware of the photos.

Kobe fans are standing behind Vanessa as she follows through with her lawsuit.

Reports state that the sheriff’s department told deputies to delete the images to avoid disciplinary action. The coverup is sparking outrage by Kobe fans who are angered that the department did not do enough to protect the dignity and privacy of all of the victims of the crash.

Mitú will update this story as it continues to develop.

READ: Vanessa Bryant Forced To Respond To ‘Beyond Hurtful’ Comments Made By Her Own Mom On ‘El Gordo y La Flaca’

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