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How Many Naked Mexicans Does It Take to Break a Record?

For some reason, Mexico likes setting world records. Scratch that. LOVES setting world records. People will get nude, dance their heart outs, and cook massive amounts of food just to make a bit of history. Here are some singular feats accomplished by thousands of record-breaking Mexicanos.

The Largest Selfie in the World

Credit: The Telegraph / YouTube

This past June, Mexico City set the record for the biggest selfie. Despite the fact that Guinness doesn’t have a selfie category, 756 people gathered by the Monumento de Niños Heroes to put on the biggest show the selfie stick has ever seen.

This kid was probably practicing that face for weeks:

Credit: The Telegraph / YouTube

The Most People Kissing Simultaneously

Credit: AP Archive / YouTube

It shouldn’t be surprising that Mexico has broken the record for longest torta two years in a row. This year’s ginormous torta came in at a whopping 1,763 pounds (compared to last year’s 1653 pounds) and was measured at 214 feet (last year’s was 203 feet). Oh, and it only took them less than four minutes to make.

Looks like it tasted good, too:

The Biggest Bowl of Guacamole

Credit: Kinograma Films / YouTube

Un mega chingo de guac, porfis. In March 2011, 600 students from the Technical Institute of Monterey churned out the world’s biggest mortar of guacamole. According to Jesús Saldaña, leader of the event, “[we] used 100 kilos of lemons to make sure that the guacamole wouldn’t spoil … we’re going to be handing out chips to students until it runs out.” Wait, that’s un chingo de chips, too.

The Most People Appearing Nude in a Photograph

Credit: REFORMA / YouTube

Photographer Spencer Tunick has traveled all over the world photographing mobs of nude folks. In 2010, he used a wide-angle lens to shoot a group of 2,500 posing in front of Sydney’s Opera House. In 2002, he organized a pig pile of 2,000 people in Parque Forestal in Santiago, Chile.

He raised the bar for himself when he got to Mexico City, a place home to nearly 9 million people, and was able to recruit 18,000 Chilangos for a record-breaking shoot in the Zócalo.

Credit: REFORMA / YouTube

The Biggest Tortilla Ever Made

Credit: Mexiquense Noticias / YouTube

You’re gonna need a really big comal for that, btw. Back in 2013 in Tlalnepantla, a town in the state of Mexico, as an homage to Mexican culture and history, a group cooked the world’s largest tortilla – ringing in at nearly 10 feet and 440 pounds.

The Largest Choreographed Dance of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller”

Credit: REFORMA / YouTube

Mexicans love Maicol Yakson, too. A few weeks after Michael Jackson’s death, about 50,000 people gathered behind Mexico City’s Monumento de la Revolución to commemorate the king of pop by flash mobbing his famous “Thriller” dance.

READ: 13 Latino Actors Who Kicked Off their Careers in Telenovelas

The Tallest Order of Hot Chocolate

Credit: Efekto Televisión

Perhaps a clever marketing gimmick from Nestlé, in November 2010, their Abuelita brand celebrated its 70th anniversary by brewing up 2,400 liters of hot chocolate – the biggest cup of hot chocolate ever made.

The Biggest Mentos and Coca Cola Explosion

Credit: RT / YouTube

In August 2010, 2,433 people gathered at Six Flags Mexico City to conduct the wildest 5th grade science experiment of their dreams. They proudly beat the record set by 1,500 people in Singapore the month prior. No word whether the Mexican coke and Mentos explosion tasted better that American coke and Mentos explosions.

The Largest Parade of Classic Cars

Credit: La Jornada en línea / YouTube

And you thought traffic in D.F. couldn’t get any worse. In May 2014, Mexico City beat Holland’s record for the world’s largest parade of antique cars. Guinness counted a total of 1,721 cars cruising down Reforma, and more than 250,000 spectators came to cheer them on.

The Largest Distribution of Energy-Saving Light Bulbs

Credit: armydre2008 / flickr

In 2012, then Mexican president, Felipe Calderón made Guinness World Records history for giving out the most energy saving light bulbs for free. 23 million energy-saving light bulbs were doled out to citizens of el monstruo. Calderón said that the light bulbs would decrease 1.4 million tons of carbon dioxide, equivalent to removing 600,000 cars from the streets.

If you could break any world record, what would it be? mitú wants to know. Tell us in the comments below. 

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

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Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

When it comes to international happiness rankings, Mexico has long done well in many measurements. In fact, in 2019, Mexico placed number 23 beating out every other Latin American country except for Costa Rica. But in 2020, things looks a lot different as the country slipped 23 spots on the list. What does this mean for Mexico and its residents? 

Mexico slips 23 spots on the World Happiness Report thanks to a variety of compelling factors.

Mexico plummeted 23 places to the 46th happiest nation in the world, according to the 2020 happiness rankings in the latest edition of the United Nations’ World Happiness Report. The coronavirus pandemic had a significant impact on Mexicans’ happiness in 2020, the new report indicates.

“Covid-19 has shaken, taken, and reshaped lives everywhere,” the report noted, and that is especially true in Mexico, where almost 200,000 people have lost their lives to the disease and millions lost their jobs last year as the economy recorded its worst downturn since the Great Depression.

Based on results of the Gallup World Poll as well as an analysis of data related to the happiness impacts of Covid-19, Mexico’s score on the World Happiness Report index was 5.96, an 8% slump compared to its average score between 2017 and 2019 when its average ranking was 23rd.

The only nations that dropped more than Mexico – the worst country to be in during the pandemic, according to an analysis by the Bloomberg news agency – were El Salvador, the Philippines and Benin.

Mexico has struggled especially hard against the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Since the pandemic started, Mexico has fared far worse than many other countries across Latin America. Today, there are reports that Mexico has been undercounting and underreporting both the number of confirmed cases and the number of deaths. Given this reality, the country is 2nd worst in the world when it comes to number of suspected deaths, with more than 200,000 people dead. 

Could the happiness level have an impact on this year’s elections?

Given that Mexico’s decline in the rankings appears related to the severity of the coronavirus pandemic here, one might assume that the popularity of the federal government – which has been widely condemned for its management of the crisis from both a health and economic perspective – would take a hit.

But a poll published earlier this month found that 55.9% of respondents approved of President López Obrador’s management of the pandemic and 44% indicated that they would vote for the ruling Morena party if the election for federal deputies were held the day they were polled.

Support for Morena, which apparently got a shot in the arm from the national vaccination program even as it proceeded slowly, was more than four times higher than that for the two main opposition parties, the PAN and the PRI.

Still, Mexico’s slide in the happiness rankings could give López Obrador – who has claimed that ordinary Mexicans are happier with him in office – pause for thought.

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