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Mexican Restaurants in New York that will Blow Your Mind

Let’s be honest, New York gets hated on constantly about its Mexican food. It may not compete with the Southwest, but there is good Mexican food in Nueva York. You just need to know where to go.

Mesa Coyoacan

Williamsburg

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Photo Credit: mesohungry / flickr

Mesa Coyoacan is named after the Mexico City neighborhood where Chef Ivan Garcia grew up. They’ve got chilaquiles, sopes, chiles en nogada and tacos, which come three per order on delicious handmade tortillas.

372 Graham Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11211  (718) 782-8171

The Black Ant

East Village

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Photo Credit: Sourivone V. / Yelp

The Black Ant is a contemporary Mexican restaurant that takes traditional ingredients and adds a twist. They’ve got fries made out of nopales, guacamole with chunks of mango, and, if you’re craving something crunchy, fried grasshoppers with chile and limón.

60 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003  (212) 598-0300

READ: 13 People and Places Keeping San Francisco’s Latino Roots Alive

Fonda

East Village, Park Slope, Chelsea

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Photo Credit: Lars K. / Yelp

Fonda offers “cantina style” Nuevo Mexican cuisine. Try some queso fundido with chorizo, a mango margarita or their guacamole, which is made to order.

East Village: 40 Avenue B, New York, NY 10009  (646) 854-8581   Park Slope: 434 7th Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11215  (718) 369-3144   Chelsea: 189 9th Ave, New York, NY 10011  (917) 525-5252

Dos Toros

East Village

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Photo Credit: Matt F. / Yelp

If it’s a San Francisco, Mission-style burrito you crave, then head to Dos Toros. Founded by two Bay Area transplants, the burritos are the size of your forearm and just as big on flavor.

137 4th Ave, New York, NY 10003  (212) 677-7300

READ: Latino Dishes That’ll Cure Anything

Chavela’s

Crown Heights

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Photo Credit: Ben W. / Yelp

Chavela’s offers Mexican comfort food at its best. You up for some crab taquitos or tacos de nopales? Wash ’em down with a cucumber margarita or spicy michelada.

736 Franklin Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11238  (718) 622-3100

La Lucha NYC

East Village

Best way to deliver a bill ever. #laluchanyc #wrestling #eastvillage #nyc

A photo posted by Kerri Manika (@kezaar) on

La Esquina

SoHo

Monday Lunch calls for the Tinga platter. Guaranteed to start your week right! #LaEsquina #nyc #lunch #foodporn

A photo posted by La Esquina. (@esquinanyc) on

Rosa Mexicano

Manhattan

Hecho en Dumbo

NoHo

Wine and Mexican food #maridaje #pairing #wine #food #NYC ❤️?

A photo posted by Hecho en Dumbo (@hechoendumbo) on

Pampano

Midtown

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Photo Credit: scaredykat / Flickr

If you’re ready to spend some cash, Pampano has two different spaces. One sells upscale coastal Mexican cuisine, another space has tapas and cocktails and the third space is a “secret” lunch-only Taqueria.

209 E 49th St, New York, NY 10017  (212) 751-4545  and  805 3rd AveNew York, NY 10022  (212) 751-5257

Puebla Mini Market

Sunset Park

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Photo Credit: dan.freed.948 / Facebook

Enough of the fancy stuff. For tortas you have to check out Puebla Mini Market in Sunset Park. There are over 30 kinds of tortas to choose from and they all start with beautiful bolillos.

3908 5th Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11232  (718) 435-3326

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Neiman Marcus Is Charging White People Prices For “Traditional, Handmade” Tamales And The Internet Has Had Enough

Culture

Neiman Marcus Is Charging White People Prices For “Traditional, Handmade” Tamales And The Internet Has Had Enough

Paul Gobert / Getty Images

America’s fancification and appropriation of simple, traditional foods – especially “ethnic foods” – reached another milestone with the news that Dallas-based retailer Neiman Marcus is now selling gourmet tamales on its website at a pretty astounding price — six dozen for $92, plus $18 for shipping. That’s $110 for 72 tamales.

How have we made it this far without Neiman Marcus tamales? For years, we’ve been relying on handmade tamales from our tías and primas like peasants, unaware that luxury tamales were just a click and a payday away.

The luxury tamales made headlines in outlets ranging from the Dallas Morning News to GQMy San Antonio called it “an outright food foul,” taking this “usually affordable, traditional dish” and tacking on “an outrageous price tag.”

But is it really at all surprising that a luxury retailer is trying to make a buck off our people’s food and culture?

Neiman Marcus is the type of place where you can expect to see a Mexican-inspired jacket, such as this one, retailing for more than $300.

Given the propensity for corporations from around the world to try and capitalize off other people’s cultures, it really isn’t too surprising that Neiman Marcus would launch a line of luxury tamales.

Now the Dallas-based luxury retailer is once again offering up ‘luxury yet tradition’ with their ‘handmade’ tamales.

Although news of the tamales has once again shocked many of us, it isn’t exactly new. It was in 2016 when Neiman Marcus first started offering these highbrow tamales and even then it made headlines. And it’s easy to see why.

An order of six dozen Neiman Marcus tamales will set you back $92, plus shipping. Neiman Marcus tamales might look like regular tamales, but they’re actually very expensive and fancy. They are “handmade from a traditional recipe of fresh stone-ground corn, top-quality meats, lard, spices, and natural flavorings.” Can the food truck by your office honestly claim that its meats are top-quality? Or is your mama using luxury masa?! 

At six dozen (72 total if you’re too lazy to do the math), the $92 price tag isn’t totally off the mark, especially if they’re truly handmade. Anyone who has helped make tamales during the holidays knows that it’s not only time-consuming, it also takes a bit of practice. (And if you screw up too often, you’ll be roasted for it by your mom and tías).

They’re only available in beef, chicken and pork. Sorry, folks, no rajas. Unfortunately for Neiman Marcus customers, they’ll never experience what it’s like to unwrap a tamal, bite into it and realize it’s a random tamal de dulce that got mixed in with a different batch. 

But wait, there’s more! You can also order an “Enchilada Dinner” for $72.

Neiman Marcus didn’t stop with the tamales. Shoppers can also order flautas and enchiladas. In fact, for $72, plus $18 shipping, you get 12 enchiladas: six with beef and six with chicken.

Yup, Neiman Marcus is asking people to pay $90 for 12 enchiladas.

Just curious as to how many people are actually paying these white people prices to get their hands on traditional Mexican foods?

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This Mexican Mom Has Gone Viral On TikTok For Her Recipe Videos Showing You How Easy It Is To Be A Cook

Culture

This Mexican Mom Has Gone Viral On TikTok For Her Recipe Videos Showing You How Easy It Is To Be A Cook

@JennyMartinezzz / TikTok

Look, it’s no secret that cooking isn’t for everyone. It can be tiring, time-consuming, and sometimes downright difficult. Even if we’re learning from our abuelos or tíos, who are passing down a generation’s worth of recipes, the idea of cooking can be intimidating.

But one woman has taken to TikTok to demystify Mexican cooking and she’s making it look super easy in the process. And as someone who’s actually tried out several of her quick TikTok recipe videos, I can tell you, it is as easy as it looks.

Jenny Martinez has quickly become TikTok’s favorite Latina mom.

In her videos on TikTok, Jenny Martinez shares her traditional Mexican recipient with more than 1.5 million followers – and everything from her dad’s famous shrimp cocktail to her easy churros is on the menu.

Martinez got the idea to create recipe videos for TikTok from her daughter, who herself is an avid TikTok user. The duo shot a few short videos and from their things quickly escalated.

“The following morning my phone was blowing up and we couldn’t believe it that one of my videos had gone viral,” Martinez told In The Know.

Although creating video content, especially cooking content, is a lot of work, Martinez sees it as a chance to do what she already loves – to cook. For her, it’s not just about making mouthwatering meals, like conchas con nieve or chuletas abobadasit’s about preserving Mexican culture.

She learned traditional cooking from her mother growing up.

Like so many of us, Martinez grew up learning how to cook with her mother.

“For me, it’s not — it’s not that I’m giving away my secrets,” Martinez told In The Know. “To me, it’s just sharing my knowledge to the younger community so we can continue our culture, the authentic Mexican recipes that our grandmas, our mothers passed down to us.”

Food is one of the greatest bonds between a community. It helps shape traditions, events, ceremonies, and entire cultures. Martinez knows this and believes that food can unite the people within a culture while educating those outside of it. Some of her followers haven’t heard of the ingredients she uses but her explainers in English make such barriers fade away.

“The whole Mexican cooking, it’s just something that connects us together as a community and as Mexicans,” Martinez told In The Know. “Now that I see that in social media that everybody wants to learn and everybody wants to keep on the traditions, that’s what I like. That’s what I want to see.”

The mom’s recipes are great for budding chefs at all levels.

Martinez tells her followers not to get so hung up on trying something new and just attempt to do what you want with the recipe.

“You don’t have to be an expert in cooking. Just open the fridge and start following my recipes. I try to make them as easy as possible,” she said.

But at the heart of it all, Martinez is really passionate about her craft.

“I honestly see the beauty in food and in the cooking,” Martinez told In The Know. “I mean, it’s kind of like an art at the end of the day. When you’re plating it and when you see everything just combining. When you see all of those ingredients, that aroma coming out, to me it’s just beautiful.”

One of her most popular recipe videos are her sandia paletas!

Sure, summer may be over but it’s still forever sandia season in my mind. Especially the version Martinez does on her TikTok. Lathered in chamo y and tajin, you’ll never look at sandia paletas the same.

And you’re not the only one – this video has been viewed more than 1.2 million times!

This is the one that I tried to make and it turned out soooo good.

Carne asada nachos are the ultimate cure for la cruda and every time I was out at bar hoping (pre-Covid obviously), I’d almost always end up at a truck by my house for these guys. But doing them at home is just as easy and mil veces mas delicious!

Martinez teaches you how to make these bomb nachos in less than 30 seconds so it’s worth your investment. The result is everything!

Which recipes are you most excited to try out? Or h

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