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Here is How the Internet Totally Reunited a Mexican Woman with Her Stolen Pickup Truck

The Internet is a cruel place where everything, like everything, is fair game for jokes and mockery. Zaira Salazar Medina learned this the hard way when she asked the Internet to help her find her stolen truck with a badly drawn picture. But the Internet’s lack of chill actually ended up helping her…

It all started when Zaira Salazar Medina made this plea via social media to track down her stolen pickup.

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Credit: @carosanf / Twitter

Translation: “Yesterday, at the Hector Espino market, someone stole a 1991 Nissan pick up with the plate number VB52780. The car is grey with a black roof. If you see it, please call me 6622214393. I don’t have photos but I have this drawing.”

Silly her for thinking that the Internet would sympathize and help her in a time of need.

It didn’t take long for the Internet to act as only the Internet can… with jokes.

Soon everyone with a social media account and access to photo editing started to “spot” the truck everywhere.

Seriously… everywhere.

The truck had some great times, like when it delivered a bed full of pizza.

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Credit: @pritpr / Twitter

It even became an emoji!

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Credit: @FabianCrundall / Twitter

Don’t lie. You’d totally use that emoji.

Then, because the image became so viral, someone actually recognized it and reported it.

Everyone following the story was like:

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Credit: The Muppets / ABC / resting-sadface / Tumblr

Who would have ever guessed a crude drawing posted to Facebook would actually lead to the truck being recovered and returned?

And the world discovered that the truck DID look like the drawing.

Look Alike
Credit: @carosanf / Twitter / @elimaprcial / Twitter

Seems like Salazar has a hidden talent, no?

But that’s not the end of the story.

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Credit: Real Housewives of Atlanta / Bravo / RealityTVGifs / Tumblr

After her story and picture went viral, Chevrolet Monclova of Mexico had a special contest just for Zaira Salazar.

¡Al fin la encontramos! Ahora ayúdala a estrenar una S10 2016.

Si esta publicación llega a 1 millón de likes al día 23 de Diciembre 2015 ¡Zaira estrenará!

#ChevroletMonclova #TodosConZaira

Posted by Chevrolet Monclova on Friday, December 11, 2015

Credit: Chevrolet Monclova / Facebook

If she could get 1 million likes on the video above, the car dealership would give her a new truck.

She reached her goal way before the Dec. 23 deadline.

El momento justo en el que la publicación logró superar el millón de “likes”
¡¡¡Felicidades Zaira!!!

Posted by Periódico La Voz on Saturday, December 12, 2015

Credit: Periódico La Voz / Facebook

And Chevrolet Monclova kept their word and gave her a brand new truck.

As for her old truck, rumor has it that it’s following it’s dream to be a race car.

http://puvlicasidm.tumblr.com/post/134992335584/dicen-que-antes-de-ser-encontrada-la-camioneta-la

Doesn’t that just warm your heart? Share this story with your friends by clicking that little share button and show them how great people and the Internet can be.

Remembering Carmelita Torres, The Teenage Mexicana Who Started A Riot At The Texas Border

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Remembering Carmelita Torres, The Teenage Mexicana Who Started A Riot At The Texas Border

In 1917, newspapers called Carmelita Torres the leader of an anti-American riot. Today, the Mexican heroine is remembered as “the Latina Rosa Parks.” At 17 years old, the maid from Juárez refused to be stripped and doused in toxic gases, as was required for people crossing the southern border into El Paso, Texas, inciting hundreds of other women migrants to follow suit and thousands more to rise up in protest against the violently racist practice that inspired the gas chambers of Nazi Germany.

Described as an “auburn-haired amazon,” Torres, just a teenage girl at the time, initiated a little-known revolt called the bath riot.

The unplanned rebellion occurred during the early morning of January 28, 1917. Like most days, Torres was on a trolley filled with mostly women crossing the Santa Fe International Bridge into El Paso to clean the homes of US families. But when she arrived to her destination this time, she refused to participate in the standard delousing process — a humiliating, dangerous and also legal exercise required of Mexicans entering the US at its border. 

The quarantine-like procedure, developed by El Paso Mayor Tom Lea who believed Mexicans were spreading lice that led to a disease called typhus, aimed at disinfecting the migrants, who he called “dirty, lousy and destitute.” The plan, which had the support of the surgeon general in Washington, DC, came into practice in 1916. The process was hazardous and dehumanizing. In a facility at the El Paso border, travelers had to strip naked. Their clothes were taken to a large steam dryer and then fumigated with toxic pesticides in an area called “the gas room.” Meanwhile, an inspector would check each person’s body, including their genitals, for lice. If they found the parasitic insects, migrants would have to shave their head and body hair and then bathe in a mix of kerosene and vinegar. After this process, they received a ticket as proof they were disinfected, though they were mandated to undergo the same procedure every eight days in order to re-enter the US.

“So many people didn’t speak about it,” historian and author David Dorado Romo told Vox in an episode about the bath riot for its new docu-series Missing Chapters. “They didn’t talk about this humiliating process. They kind of internalized it. it’s that psychology of shame”

The process was particularly terrifying for women, who also experienced sexual humiliation, according to Chicana historian and writer Yolanda Leyva.

“There were rumors that, you know, when they entered the plant and they were told to strip, officers were taking their photos and then posting them in bars,” an associate professor and chair of the department of history at the University of Texas El Paso told the news site. “So I can’t even imagine that kind of feeling, like the feelings of violation and the feelings of, you know, outrage.”

Understanding those emotions firsthand, Torres refused to participate in the baths and convinced most, if not all, of the 30 women in the electric trolley to join her in defiance. An hour later, nearly 200 more women joined their protest. By noon that day, “several thousand” were demonstrating. According to reporters, “the scene reminded one of bees swarming.” Crowds threw bottles and rocks at police officers while yelling insults at them. Protesters blocked traffic into El Paso. Some even laid down on the tracks in front of the trolley cars to create a blockade. One news article said, “the hands of the feminine mob would claw at the tops of the passing cars.” Together, the group shut down the border for two days.

Unfortunately, despite migrants’ public expression of outrage and dissent of their brutal mistreatment, the uprising was quelled.

Torres, among many of her fellow demonstrators, were ultimately arrested and imprisoned. Some men were even publicly executed. Historians do not know what happened to the bold young female insurgent after she was incarcerated. As Romo says, “we’ve lost every trace.”

“She was called an instigator, a ringleader. But she was just a young woman that was just sick of the injustice, the humiliation that other women had gone through,” he added.

As for the toxic baths, the procedure not only continued but also became more dangerous. By 1917, more than 100,000 Mexicans were deloused at the border. That same year, a new immigration law required that migrants also needed a passport, had to take a literacy test and were required to pay an $8 head tax. The following year, US Public Health Service instructed border agents to turn away “imbeciles, idiots, feeble-minded persons, physical defectives, persons afflicted with loathsome or dangerous contagious diseases.”

The fumigations even inspired the gas chambers of the Holocaust. In 1929, Zyklon B, a poisonous acid gas, was added to the baths.

Almost a decade later, in 1937, a scientist suggested in a German pest science journal that Zyklon B be added in Nazi disinfection chambers. Citing its use in El Paso, even including two photos of the US border city’s delousing facilities as an example of how effective the dangerous acid gas is at killing unwanted pests, he pushed for its use in concentration camps. Eventually, the dosing process murdered millions of people.

“The fumigation of Mexican immigrants wasn’t just reminiscent of Nazi Germany — it was directly linked to it,” Romo said. “It’s not so much that the United States was copying Nazi Germany; it’s the opposite. Nazi Germany was copying the United States. “

Back in Texas, agents added more harmful products to the fumigation process, including spraying DDT, a now-banned toxic pesticide, in migrants’ faces and private areas.

 It wasn’t until the 1960s, less than five decades ago, that health authorities stated the delousing process was hazardous and put an end to the practice.

While the gas chambers at the southern border have since shut down, they have now been replaced with shoddy detention centers that house hundreds of thousands of migrants who similarly await to hear if they are suited for entry into the country. Like those who came before them, these migrants are unjustly mistreated, some, including children, even dying, and are deemed by mainstream media and the federal government as being defective and a hazardous threat to the US. 

Read: Another Migrant Tragically Died In US Custody Leaving Behind An 11-Year-Old Daughter

ICE Confirms That A Mexican Man Has Died Of Cardiac Arrest While In Their Custody And How Does This Keep Happening

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ICE Confirms That A Mexican Man Has Died Of Cardiac Arrest While In Their Custody And How Does This Keep Happening

DeportadosUnidos / Twitter

We often hear of children dying while in ICE custody. But adult migrants are also dying while being detained by the US government. And the latest victim is a 44-year-old Mexican national who died at a hospital in Georgia.

Official cause of death has been listed as cardiac arrest but he was also complaining of abdominal pain – which is what he was initially taken into the hospital for.

Pedro Arriago-Santoya, a detained migrant from Mexico, has died at a Georgia hospital while in ICE custody.

Credit: @CNN / Twitter

The Mexican national died at Piedmont Midtown Medical Center in Columbus, with staff there identifying his preliminary cause of death as cardio-pulmonary arrest. Secondary causes of death were listed as multi-organ system failure; endocarditis, or an infection of the inner linings of the heart; diluted cardiomyopathy, or a reduced ability by the heart to pump blood; and respiratory failure.

On June 6, he had been ordered deported by an immigration judge and was sent to Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, Georgia.

The man is at least the 7th victim to die while in ICE custody since October.

Credit: @lesleyabravanel / Twitter

Although there have been several reported deaths of migrant children while in ICE custody, adult migrants have also fallen victim to the system.

Arraigo-Santoyo is just the latest victim to die, in part, thanks to Trump’s inhumane immigration policies.

The man had been detained at the Stewart Facility, which had become infamous for safety concerns.

Credit: @Haleaziz / Twitter

Last year, federal investigators found that the Stewart Detention Center has seen incidents of drug smuggling, medical staff shortages, and safety issues, according to documents first published by the Center for Investigative Reporting and Atlanta radio station WABE.

According to officials, the man died of cardiac arrest after arriving at the hospital.

Credit: @ajplus / Twitter

On July 20, he was taken to a local hospital after complaining of abdominal pain. Two days later, he went into cardiac arrest and was placed on a ventilator and moved to the intensive care ward, where he remained comatose until he went into cardiac arrest again on Wednesday.

Many hoped that the Mexican government would demand an independent inquiry so we can have a clearer picture of what really happened.

Credit: @LoriBezahler / Twitter

Given the lack of information and sometimes conflicting information the public gets from ICE and Border Patrol, many are skeptical of their responses.

While some on Twitter demanded hearings immediately.

Credit: @Haleaziz / Twitter

Several of the victims who have died while in ICE custody have been dying of preventable or treatable illnesses. Many pointed out that children shouldn’t be dying of the flu with all the medical resources we have available in the US.

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