Things That Matter

Turns Out The Worst Punishment For Cartel Members Isn’t Prison, It’s Forcing Them To Wear Lingerie

Credit: Bob Price / YouTube

After watching Mexican cartels terrorize Mexico, a Mexican marine isn’t letting them face the justice system without taking matters into his own hands — by shaming them with sexy lingerie.

Lingerie. En serio.

Erick Morales Guevara, also known as “The Hammer,”  “El Marino Loko” or “Señor Thor,” was so fed up with everything the cartels were getting away with that he struck back by humiliating cartel members, ordering his captures to wear lacy outfits and, on occasion, kiss each other.

Because Mexican men can be extremely macho, having their picture taken while wearing a lacy top is probably even more embarrassing than actually being captured by the authorities. Breitbart published the picture of a masked Señor Thor next to a captured man flaunting a black eye to match the nighty.

But his doings have not gone unnoticed by the cartel. After a raid of a property owned by Silvestre “El Chive” Haro Rodríguez, leader of the Gulf Cartel in Tampico — where the marine defaced a picture of the leader’s father and tampered with his ashes — the cartel put up banners claiming Morales Guevara was under their payroll.

However, Mexican authorities have moved the marine to another part of the country where they say “he is currently ‘having fun’ in the Mexican state of Michoacán, where he continues to capture and cross-dress his victims.” Payback’s a b*tch.

Watch the clip below and read more about this courageous marine here.

Credit: Bob Price / YouTube

READ: By Day He Herds Cattle and Moonlights as a Cartel Killer

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Mexico Is Putting Luxury Cars, Condos, And Land Seized From Real Life Narcos Up For Auction, Here’s What You Could Buy

Things That Matter

Mexico Is Putting Luxury Cars, Condos, And Land Seized From Real Life Narcos Up For Auction, Here’s What You Could Buy

lopezobrador / Instagram

Giant estates with swimming pools and escape tunnels, a ranch surrounded by acres of land, and a chic luxury apartment with a terrifying history were among the 27 properties Mexico had seized from drug traffickers and others auctioned on Sunday.

The government is seizing property and selling it at auction.

Credit: @outsidetheknow / Twitter

The apartments auctioned on Sunday include one of a cartel leader who was killed there and disposed of by his brothers.

The government is also selling off land. The cheapest is a lot in Culiacán, Sinaloa, priced at about $11,200 USD, while the most expensive is the Rancho Los Tres García in Naucalpan, México state, priced at over $1.6 million USD. It was confiscated from convicted drug trafficker Carlos Montemayor, father-in-law of Edgar “La Barbie” Valdez Villarreal, after he was arrested in 2010.

According to Mexican media, the auction raised $56.6 million pesos (or about $3 million USD) of the 167m pesos predicted.

The Mexican President pledged that all the money raised from the auctions would go to benefit impoverished communities.

Credit: @BBCNewsbeat / Twitter

According to Lopez-Obrador (AMLO), the proceeds from the auction of properties and land, which had been seized by previous governments, would go to aid marginalized communities in the poor and violent state of Guerrero.

“Buyers will know that in addition to acquiring a good deal, they will also be doing good, that is, they will be helping those who need support because of the situation of poverty and marginalization they suffer,” AMLO said Friday.

In one of his first acts in office, Lopez Obrador enforced an austerity plan.

Credit: @thesunpostnews / Twitter

AMLO sold government-owned vehicles and even planned on selling the president’s brand new Boeing 787 jetliner. He also dismissed the Presidential Guard, which is tasked with protecting the president, and declined to move into Los Pinos – Mexico’s version of the White House – and instead lives in his private home.

In a similar auction at the end of May, Mexican authorities raised $1.5 million from the sales of 82 vehicles, including a Lamborghini and other assets seized from criminals and at least one former politician.

Credit: @dwnews / Twitter

The late-May auction saw 800 bidders, with the money raised going to two poor communities in the southern state of Oaxaca to improve roads and schools. Seventeen black, bulletproof Chevrolet Suburbans were also up for auction but it was the muscle cars and vintage VWs that got all the attention.

Reactions on Twitter were pretty mixed.

Credit: @BBCWorld / Twitter

A pretty common sentiment across Twitter was that people just wouldn’t feel safe moving into a home that had been seized from a former drug lord. I mean just think of all the risk that carries with it. Like that drug lord still has connections, still has friends – there are still people that are aware of its history. Maybe they’d show up wanting to take it for themselves at some point.

But everyone agreed that giving the proceeds of the auction to help the poor was the right move.

Credit: @BBCWorld / Twitter

Especially since the communities that will benefit from these proceeds are in violence plagued Guerrero state – a state that has suffered greatly because of the Drug War.

Mexican Children As Young At 6 Are Training To Be Child Soldiers Against The Growing Violence At The Hands Of Cartels

Things That Matter

Mexican Children As Young At 6 Are Training To Be Child Soldiers Against The Growing Violence At The Hands Of Cartels

anadorado \ Getty Images

Mexico has long been battling a drug war against a sprawling network of powerful cartels. However, in many parts of the country, the government isn’t focused on helping end the violence.

Most federal forces and national guard troops are sent to protect major cities or tourist destinations – think Acapulco, Cancun, or Mexico City.

This lack of protection is leading many across the country to come up with their own ways to defend themselves.

In the midst of a cartel war zone, children as young as six are taking up arms to fight back against growing cartels.

Credit: @nela_minded / Twitter

The Mexican Drug War started over a decade ago but with each passing year, it becomes more violent, despite promises from the new president to begin winding it down. The first three months of 2019 were the deadliest yet – with nearly 9,000 murders across the country.

Guerrero, a state that is home to the tourist resort of Acapulco and just south of the capital of Mexico City, is particularly deadly. It often tops the list of most deadly states in the country and is actually designated a ‘no-go zone’ by the US State Department.

It’s here in the Nahua village of Rincòn de Chautla where children as young as six are being trained to fight back against the cartels.

They march, train, and carry fake rifles made of tree branches while their instructor is armed with a real gun.

Credit: @RolandHuschke / Twitter

In a recent report, The Daily Beast spoke to several of these child soldiers. One six-year-old, Jeremías Ramìrez, said: “We’re practicing to defend our town, so los sicarios won’t be able to kill us.”

Angélica Flores, 12, when said: “If they come, we’ll be ready for them.” She wants her village to have “peace, justice, and to keep out the criminals.”

Both children are members of the Regional Coordinator of Community Authorities (CRAC). Under Mexican law, indigenous peoples have traditionally been allowed to form policías comunitarias (community police) groups like CRAC.

As cartel violence has surged in recent years, these comunitarios, as they’re commonly called, are often the only protection available against ruthless and predatory cartels. Rincón de Chautla and the surrounding pueblos – all of which sit on an important shipping corridor for drugs and other contraband – are no exception.

In just the past month, seven villagers have been murdered or abducted.

Credit: @rebeccaplevin / Twitter

There have been seven Nahua murdered or abducted in the last month alone, five of whom were high-ranking members of the CRAC.

Two of these were dismembered by the Ardillos Cartel and left in trash bags at the side of the road running into Chilapa city in late May. The most recent victim, a retired community policeman named Eugenio Máximo, was dumped just outside of Rincón de Chautla on June 2nd.

The Nahua people can’t trust anyone but themselves for defense.

The communities of these rugged mountains say they are powerless without their own forces. They can’t rely on the soldiers or the police as they know they’re working with Los Ardillos.

One villager told The Daily Beast, “Once we’re dead our children must know how to defend themselves. The government is never going to save them.”

Even human rights organizations see few other options for the people of Rincòn de Chautla. “These communities are desperate,” one organization leader told The Daily Beast, “and there’s no one to turn to for help.”

But all-female brigade commander Rodrìguez has an even simpler answer for CRAC’s critics.“If those in the government don’t like women and niños training,” she says, “then let them do their job and protect us.”