Culture

The Origin of Some of Your Favorite English Words is Surprising

Getty Images

Look, Mexico has had a bigger impact on America, more than anyone even realizes.  Proof? These words that come from Nahuatl, the language of the Mexicans, have made it into common day use, like…

Avocado

avocado

Guacamole

guacamole

Tomato

tomato

Jalapeño

jalapeno

Mezcal

Mezcal

Don’t forget to share this story with your friends by clicking the button below!

These Avocado Hair Masks Will Nourish Your Rizos And Add Shine And Moisture

Fierce

These Avocado Hair Masks Will Nourish Your Rizos And Add Shine And Moisture

svehlik / Getty Images

It’s a fact universally acknowledged that avocados are pretty much god’s gift to humanity. Not only are avocados delicious on tacos and tortilla chips, but they are also incredibly versatile. Because of their high amounts of Vitamin K and potassium, many people call avocados a superfood. But you don’t have to ingest this magical fruit to reap its benefits. The high-fat content in avocados makes them a wonderful addition to any topical beauty routine–especially your hair routine.

The benefits of avocado hair masks are practically endless. The monounsaturated fatty acids in avocados help our hair and scalp absorb certain vitamins and minerals that are essential to our hair health. Additionally, the oil in avocado is very similar to the natural sebum that our own scalp produces. This makes avocados especially helpful in moisturizing dull and brittle strands.

Here at FIERCE by mitú, we have compiled a list of avocado hair masks recipe to help your elevate your hair game to the best it’s ever been. Take a look below!

The “Hair Workout” Mask

@zapwater/Instagram

If you have weak and brittle strands, look no further than this DIY strengthening mask. This mask will help fortify hair follicles that are prone to breakage and splitting. The protein in the egg yolks help to bind porous follicles, the castor oil coats and strengthens the hair shaft, and the avocado contains high amounts of vitamins B and E which also helps to protect.

-2 egg yolks

-2 TBSP Castor Oil

-1 ripe Avocado

Mix all ingredients in a medium-sized bowl, making sure the avocado is fully mashed. Apply on dry hair. Make sure your strands are fully saturated. Leave and cover with a shower cap for 1-2 hours. Wash thoroughly. Shampoo and condition as usual.

The Moisture Mask

@revesdesabine/Instagram

This mask is great for those of us who have hair that’s looking a little thirst. Honey acts as a natural humectant, meaning it attracts moisture to the hair. Olive oil has anti-inflammatory properties that promote scalp health and prevent dandruff. Along with avocado, the high levels of monounsaturated fatty acids in these ingredients will do wonders to quench dry locks.

– 1/2 ripe Avocado

– 1 TBSP Honey

– 1 TBSP Olive Oil

Mash or blend the avocado thoroughly until it is completely smooth. Mix in the honey and olive oil. Apply to hair, making sure to concentrate on ends. Leave on 30 minutes to an hour and then rinse. Shampoo and condition as usual.

The Scalp SOS Mask

@erica.esthetician/Instagram

If you suffer from a flaky or itchy scalp, your scalp’s health may be compromised. While so many people focus on nourishing the hair shaft, they may be neglecting the root of the issue (pun intended). The tea tree oil and honey in this mask will help clear out scalp build-up and leave your follicles clear and clean.

– 1 ripe Avocado

– 10 drops Argan Oil

– 2 TBSP Honey

– 1-3 drops Tea Tree Oil

Combine all ingredients into a bowl and mash well. Once the mixture is smooth, apply to head, focusing on the roots. Cover the mask and leave on overnight for maximum results. Rinse out and shampoo and condition as usual.

The Diamond Mask

@hairbyamandafrancke/Instagram

Suffering from dull locks? Your hair may have an excess of buildup or a hair cuticle that is uneven and fails to reflect light. The lemon juice’s acidity will help remove build up. While the banana will provide both acidity and moisture to the hair. The coconut oil and avocado will help to flatten the hair cuticle, making it easier for light to reflect off your strands. This mask will help your hair shine bright like a diamond!

– 1 TBSP Lemon Juice

– 1 ripe Avocado

– 1/2 a ripe (but not overripe) Banana

– 2 TBSP Coconut Oil

Add all ingredients to a blender and mix until there are no lumps left. Apply mixture to hair and evenly distribute with a wide tooth comb. Leave on hair for 30 minutes and then rinse. Shampoo and condition as usual.

The Miracle Grow Mask

@thehomiecherry/Instagram

If you’re on a #hairgrowthjourney and you’re not seeing much progress, it is probably caused by a few key culprits. Either your hair is breaking off too fast to retain length, or your scalp health isn’t as great as it should be, leading to clogged-up follicles. The ingredients in this hair mask are sure to jump-start an inch or two!

– 1 Ripe Avocado 

– 3 TSP Fresh Aloe Vera Gel

– 1 Vitamin E Capsule

– 1-3 drops of Rosemary Oil

Mash avocado in a medium-sized bowl. Make sure that there are very few chunks. Combine the rest of ingredients and mix well. Spread mixture on your hair, concentrating at the roots and ends. Leave the mixture on for 30 minutes to an hour. Rinse thoroughly. Shampoo and condition as usual.

Apparently The First English Recipe For Guacamole Was Written By A Pirate And Why Aren’t We Surprised

Culture

Apparently The First English Recipe For Guacamole Was Written By A Pirate And Why Aren’t We Surprised

National Portrait Gallery / Spices In My DNA

Have you ever wondered how guacamole ever made its way into a worldwide phenomenon? That is, beyond the fact that of course everyone likes it because it is hella delicious. Rather, have you brushed up on your history, and could you tell us about the who, what, when, where and how of guac’s ascendency to culinary fame? We’re guessing the answer’s no, since you’re still here, reading. Well, buckle up, kids. This is the story about how the original guac recipe made its way into the English language.

The story starts with a white dude. Because of course it does.

Creative Commons / National Portrait Gallery

To give you a bit of background, British-born William Dampier is the guy who put pen to paper and immortalized the first guacamole recipe in English. But, the story about how he got to that point is more interesting than it would seem. Dampier was a pirate, who started his career in 1679, in Mexico’s Bay of Campeche. This was back in the day where the gold standard of a pirate diet was basically dried beef, bread and warm beer – yeah, there’s nothing more that tastes of success than warm beer. The worst a pirate’s lifestyle lead to situations that included cannibalism and scurvy. It makes Pirates of the Caribbeansound like a picnic.

So here’s the thing. Dampier’s fascination with food is understandable. After all, it’s not like he was experiencing fine dining when he was at sea. What was a little more unusual was the fact that he decided to write about his experiences tasting the myriad of dishes he was offered throughout his travels. In fact, Dampier’s record-keeping was so meticulous that after fifteen years of piracy, he converted his notes into a bestselling novel: A New Voyage Around the World. Okay, okay, he was also probably motivated to explore a career as an author at that time because Spain had sentenced him to a year in prison. Nobody’s perfect, right?

Yeah, but get to the part about guac.

Instagram / @itsfresh

If you’re thinking that Dampier’s story is sounding a little familiar, we’ll tell you why: he was one hell of a basic travel blogger. He literally experienced the same existential crisis we all have in our twenties, decided that the standard career paths in logging and sugar plantations weren’t for him, and then set off around the world documenting his travels. We all know that if he had access to Insta, he would’ve been killing it in the influencer game.

Dampier’s journeys saw him mix with the locals he met throughout Latin America, and that’s where he fell in love with guacamole. It was in the Bay of Panama that Dampier wrote about a fruit “as big as a large lemon … [with] skin [like] black bark, and pretty smooth.” More flavor was added to it when the ripened fruit was “mixed with sugar and lime juice and beaten together [on] a plate.” And there we have it, amigas: the OG guac recipe, in English.

And that brings us to the guac recipes of today.

Pinterest / Macheesmo

Obviously, guacamole as a recipe hasn’t stayed the same since Dampier’s time. Granted, your abuelita probably puts her own special twist on her guac creations. That’s why we all love her so much – and why her guacamole recipes always keep us coming back for seconds … and thirds.

Then again, we’ve also seen some pretty horrendous reincarnations of the beloved guac. Some more atrocious examples of this include adding ranch seasoning to the standard recipe, some godforsaken pineapple guacamole, a moron’s take that saw fresh peas added with a hold on the lime juice, and for whatever reason the decision to include lettuce. Oh, and let’s not forget about the pomegranate guacamole

So, what crazy takes have you seen on the traditional guac? Or better yet, do you have a favorite, go-to guacamole recipe? Let us know on Facebook – you can find us through the icon at the top of the page.

Paid Promoted Stories