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Mexican Government Said To Have Blocked The Investigation Of The 43 Missing Students

Credit: @abimaelavilez / Instagram

It’s been over a year since 43 students from Ayotzinapa, a rural town in Mexico, disappeared without a trace. Due to international pressure, the Mexican government invited foreign investigators to look into the event of September 2014. However, these investigators are leaving the country without solving the crime because they’ve been blocked from the government, they say.

“The conditions to conduct our work don’t exist,” said Claudia Paz y Paz, an investigator known for prosecuting a Guatemalan dictator for genocide. “And in Mexico, the proof is that the government opposed the extension of our mandate, isn’t it?”

The Mexican government says they have cooperated with the investigators giving them what they have requested, but the panel of investigators say otherwise.

Carlos Beristain, another expert on the case said, “it was clear in the government’s investigation and the official account that there was an intention to keep this case at a municipal level, in terms of responsibility, but we revealed the presence of state and federal agents at the crime scenes, and furthermore that their participation implied responsibility.” In other words, the investigation implicated the Mexican government.

Once this initial report came to light implicating a larger group of officials, the actions of the Mexican government changed from welcoming to total blockage. “There are sectors within the government that don’t want certain things to be questioned and therefore there is an attempt to reinforce the ‘historical truth,’ without taking into account the new elements we have uncovered,” Mr. Beristain told The New York Times. “These sectors within the government looked at us as a threat and this hardened their view towards us, which actually reinforces the impunity that stops things from changing in this country.” Interesting…

Even more shocking, instead of focusing their efforts on helping the investigation, Mexican media attacked the investigators of misusing funds and fabricating testimony to incarcerate military officials. Say what?! When asked to release a joint statement denouncing these accusations, the Mexican government declined and continued their investigation of the investigators.

“It is interesting that they would choose to investigate this patently baseless claim when there are thousands of families who are desperately seeking their loved ones without any assistance from the attorney general,” said James L. Cavallaro, president of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

Even though the investigators did release a report, the case is far from being solved, and only the remains of one student were found. The other 42 are still missing and the supposed scene of where the government says the bodies were incinerated is nowhere to be found.

Read more about this unsolved case and how deeply rooted it is here.

READ: A Year Has Passed Since the Ayotzinapa 43 Went Missing, and These People Are Still Marching the Streets of Mexico.

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The Afro-Caribbean Connection In Beyoncé's Lemonade You Might Not Have Known About

entertainment

The Afro-Caribbean Connection In Beyoncé’s Lemonade You Might Not Have Known About

HBO

Since evolving from Destiny’s Child into a solo artist, Beyoncé has worked with a wide range of female musicians and artists, particularly black women from around the world. There’s the Sugar Mamas , for instance, her 10-piece touring band; her inclusion of Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s inspiring TEDx Talk about feminism in “Flawless;” and her weaving of Somali-British poet Warsan Shire’s haunting poem about betrayal on Lemonade.

Among that illustrious group? Franco-Cuban sisters Ibeyi.

beyonce-ibeyi-lemonade
Credit: HBO / OkayAfrica

The sisters, Lisa-Kaindé and Naomi, not only appear in Lemonade alongside the likes of Zendaya and Amandla Stenberg, but also had their song, “River,” featured in an Instagram post Beyoncé made to promote her September 2015 Vogue cover. You can watch the video for “River” below, because it’s fantastic and because we love you:

 

Credit: Ibeyi / YouTube

And ~that’s not all.~

There’s a theory snaking its way around the internet that some of the striking imagery Beyoncé employed in Lemonade takes its cues from Santería and other Yoruba-influenced faiths popular across the Caribbean and Brazil, including and very notably in Cuba. In fact, one prominent orisha, Oshun, is mentioned by name in “River.”

“Wemile Oshun, Oshun dede, Alawede Wemile Oshun, moolowo beleru yalode moyewede.”

????

Here’s how Oshun is commonly depicted:

View this post on Instagram

#oshun

A post shared by Neia (@neialove_) on

Credit: Instagram / neialove_

She’s beautiful, right? Now, notice her gold-colored gown and her proximity to water.

Look familiar?

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Credit: HBO / HuffingtonPost

Lots of people, specifically on Instagram, are making the visual connection between elements in Lemonade — Beyoncé’s yellow Roberto Cavalli gown, a shot of her standing amid streaming water — and the color and element so often associated with Oshun.

Check it out:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BEoqQjxstud/

Credit: Instagram / kissdababi

https://www.instagram.com/p/BEoqzmdG5bA/

Credit: Instagram / thesuarezzz

https://www.instagram.com/p/BEozmapAxi7/

Credit: Instagram / coils_n_curls

https://www.instagram.com/p/BEpGRxosiGN/

Credit: Instagram / the seductive woman

To paraphrase the poster above: even when others might alter or fail…

“Oshun triumphs.”

giphy
Credit: HBO / jaiyeorie.blogspot.com

Maybe Beyoncé was influenced by her 2013 trip to Cuba? Something to ponder.

Now go check out more of Ibeyi’s music.

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Credit: Ibeyi / Tumblr

READ: Beyonce Chooses Unlikely Latina Model For Her New Clothing Campaign

What’d you think of Lemonade? And how many times are you going to listen to Ibeyi today? 187,321 times at least, right?

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