#mitúWORLD

Copa America Is Over But The Final Match Memes Are Still Fire

The Copa América Centenario final between Argentina and Chile didn’t produce any goals in regular or extra time, but it still managed to produce lots of drama. Argentina’s Gonzalo Higuaín missed a one-on-one chance to put his team up early in the match. Then, Brazilian referee Héber Roberto Lopes stole the show from stars Lionel Messi and Alexis Sánchez, handing out several yellow cards and two red cards that left each team with only 10 players. When the game went to penalties, Messi blew his penalty shot, which could have boosted Argentina to victory. After Argentina’s Lucas Biglia also missed his penalty, Chile’s Francisco Silva converted, crowning Chile the Copa América Centenario champs.


At the end of the match, this shot of Lionel Messi crying was EVERYWHERE. This little girl decided to lend him a helping hand:

BTW, it’s photoshopped.


But this is how it began: with yellow card after yellow card from referee Heber Lopes.


It was kinda like having Oprah on the field.


Lopes was handing out so many cards that he became the focal point of the match.


But soon, this missed penalty became the talk of the tourney.


Where did the ball land? Well…


This Twitter user predicted the avalanche of Messi memes.


Chile’s Alexis Sánchez was spotted behind a teary-eyed Messi with a familiar look.


Argentina’s flag was given an emoji update.


And Crying Jordan made his inevitable appearance. On the field…


On the bench…


And on the flag.


A few people switched things up. One went with Crying Messi…


And another with Crying Lebron.


This summed up how hard it is to shake off a tough loss…


And this was a savage description of what a second place team looks like.


And to cap it all off, Pitbull performed at the closing ceremony. Some weren’t down with it:


But wait — there’s more! If you really want to talk about rubbing salt in someone’s wound… this is how Chile’s Alexis Sánchez celebrated:


READ: This Lady Went To Support Her Soccer Team And Ended Up A Meme

Like this story? Click on the share button below to send to your friend!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Michael Jordan Says His Final Text Messages With Kobe Bryant Were About Good Tequila

Entertainment

Michael Jordan Says His Final Text Messages With Kobe Bryant Were About Good Tequila

A little over a year has passed since the tragic news of NBA star Kobe Bryant’s death made headlines. The shooting guard‘s sudden death in Calabasas, California, rocked the worlds of his family, friends, former teammates, and many of his fans. On Feb. 24, a public memorial service held at Staples Center saw various people in his life give speeches, including his wife Vanessa Bryant, Shaquille O’Neal, and his longtime friend and rival Michael Jordan. The former Chicago Bulls player gave a heart-rendering speech filled with fond memories of Bryant and tears. A year later, the former shooting guard admits that he still gets choked up when he remembered Bryant.

According to Jordan, he becomes particularly emotional when reflecting on the 17-month old text messages between him and his old friend.

In a recent interview with ESPN’s Jackie MacMullan, Jordan revealed that his final messages with Bryant were about family, basketball, and tequila.

In a series of text messages that took place weeks before Bryant’s death, Jordan says that he and the late basketball icon spoke about their family and good tequila. The two basketball players last texted seven weeks before Bryant’s death on Dec. 8, 2019.

“This tequila is awesome,” Bryant wrote in a text to Jordan. The message was about Jordan’s tequila brand, which he had sent to his formal rival.

In response, Jordan said, “Thank you, my brother.”

Bryant: “Yes, sir. Family good?”

Jordan: “All good. Yours?”

Bryant “All good.”

“He was just so happy,” Jordan explained to MacMullan. “He was doing so well.”

Jordan explained in his interview that at this point in his life, Bryant was fully invested in coaching his late daughter Gigi.

“Happy holidays,” Jordan went onto text Bryant in the message string, “and hope to catch up soon. Coach Kobe??!”

Bryant replied, “Ah, back at you, man. Hey, coach, I’m sitting on the bench right now, and we’re blowing this team out. 45-8.”

Jordan explained that Bryant had found so much joy in coaching his daughter’s basketball team.

Speaking about the text thread, Jordan told ESPN, “I just love that text, because it shows Kobe’s competitive nature.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Sol de Bernardo Has A New Outlook On Education Thanks To Papumba

Fierce

Sol de Bernardo Has A New Outlook On Education Thanks To Papumba

If there is one thing the pandemic has proven to be essential, it’s the internet. For Sol de Bernardo, head of content creation at Papumba, access to technology should be “a basic right.”

Adjusting to remote learning was tough for students when lockdowns were implemented around the world last year. The parents of the children also took a toll while trying to balance child care, school, and work at the same time.

“During this pandemic, I am a believer that technology is a great ally for those who could have the connection and technology to continue learning,” de Bernardo told mitú.

Unable to physically interact with friends, many children have spent hours endlessly scrolling and gaming without limits. Apps like Papumba are trying to add meaning to a child’s screen time easing parents’ concerns.

Papumba is an educational gaming app geared for children ages 2-7.

Photo courtesy of Apple

De Bernardo says the app has become “a resource widely used by parents to entertain and educate their children in this time” after seeing a spike in subscriptions.

However, for low-income families in Argentina where Papumba is based, many children are vulnerable to the lack of connectivity.

“There is a big inequality problem [and] it’s not a distant reality,” says de Bernardo.

In Argentina, 75 percent of children from low-income families don’t have access to computers. Out of those that do, 36 percent don’t have internet access.

To accommodate families Papumba often lowers their monthly prices, even offering promo codes but de Bernardo wishes access to tech could be given throughout.

A proud Latina in tech, de Bernardo’s journey was not instantaneous.

Photo courtesy of Apple.

De Bernardo started out as an educator and that background got her interested in the connection between education and technology. This intimate knowledge of the specific issue led her to bridge that gap.

“Privileged” to be working in tech, de Bernardo is encouraging other young girls to take an interest in STEM. Some advice de Bernardo has to offer young girls is to first get access to a computer, network when you can, and be confident.

“It may be difficult to have confidence in a world full of things that aren’t always good for women, but trust yourself, be dedicated, and above all, be resilient and humble,” she says.

While still a young company, de Bernardo hopes to develop more tangible devices for children to use in classrooms like high-tech dolls and books. However, her current focus is on quality education through the app.

De Bernardo wants to push Papumba to include educating children on their emotional wellbeing.

Photo courtesy of Apple

“We do not talk about emotions enough,” she says. ” We have an activity to recognize emotions where an animated child will form emotions and explains them so the children can understand that there are different emotions and it’s okay to have them.”

When introducing touchy subjects like bullying, de Bernardo finds it important to focus on teaching young children solutions to dilemmas explaining that “the explanation of the problems may not be easy for a 3-year-old to understand.”

Nevertheless, delivering context in a simplistic way is included in such activities. Most recently, the app released a game inspired by the pandemic.

An instant success, the game introduces the imaginary town of ‘Papumba Land,’ where kids can engage in replicated outdoor activities such as: hosting a barbecue, partying with friends, or having a picnic in the park.

Last month, in-person learning returned to Argentina, but de Bernardo hopes that a year online changes the approach in future children’s education.

“I think that technology can help us in this by putting adding a little fun for the child,” she says. “Learning does not have to be [treated] like a mandate where you have to learn something and repeat the year if you fail. There has to be something for the child to want to learn.”

“[Working at] Papumba has helped me understand that you can create something fun for children to enjoy learning and not make it seem like going to school is a nuisance,” she says.

The App Store featured Papumba for Women’s History Month.

READ: Nicole Chapaval Advocates For More Latinas In Tech Through Teaching App Platzi

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com