politics

Melania Trump Will Be The Second Immigrant First Lady In U.S. History

@MELANIATRUMP / Twitter

The United States of America is about to get a new First Lady, and she’s an immigrant. While Melania Trump won’t be the first foreign-born First Lady in American history, it’s been 192 years since British-born Louisa Adams, President John Adams’ wife, lived in The White House. Here’s a little timeline to familiarize yourself with the nation’s second immigrant First Lady…

Melania Trump (born Melanija Knava) was born in modern-day Slovenia when it was still Yugoslavia.


She was born to Viktor and Amalija Knavs on April 26, 1970. According to the Daily Mail, Melania’s father was a member of the League of Communists.

She always dreamed of becoming a model since she was a young girl participating in fashion shows in the small town of Sevnica, Slovenia.


“Melania was transfixed by the idea of becoming a model and loved sketching designs for clothes,” Melania’s best friend Nena Bedek told Daily Mail. “She took extra art classes outside school and was naturally stylish and she had a good dress sense. And she would pick up magazines from her mother’s trade shows, soaking up ideas.”

According to Biography, Melania began modeling at 16 years old and even dropped out of the University of Ljubljana after one year to pursue her modeling full time.


Dropping out of school seems to not have been in vain after success as a model in Paris and Milan. Melania moved to New York City in 1996 and found more success with world-renowned photographers.

Two years after moving to New York City, in 1998, Melania met Donald Trump during a New York fashion party. In 2004, they became engaged.


Even though Melania did not want to date Donald originally, she eventually established a relationship with the real estate mogul. By 2005, the couple married in front of guests that included Hillary and Bill Clinton.

Just one year after their marriage, Melania and Donald welcomed their son Barron into the world.


By 2010, Melania launched her own jewelry line and it was a hit on QVC.


According to Forbes, her jewelry line has seen a steady decrease in revenue.


Melania caused a media frenzy when she was accused of copying Michelle Obama’s 2008 Democratic National Convention speech.


All parts of the Trump campaign vehemently denied the plagiarism claims, but the similarities between the two speeches were apparent.

During the campaign, Melania stood beside her husband and supported almost everything he did, except for his Twitter etiquette.


“Sometimes I feel that the retweets sometimes get him in trouble so I say stay away from retweets,” Melanie told Sean Hannity. “And you know if he would only listen… he’s doing great.”

And, as First Lady, Melania has vowed to tackle the cyberbullying culture of America.


“Our culture has gotten too mean and too rough, especially to children and teenagers,” she told a crowd during a Trump rally in Philadelphia. “It is never OK when a 12-year-old girl or boy is mocked, bullied or attacked. It is terrible when that happens on the playground and it is absolutely unacceptable when it’s done by someone with no name hiding on the internet.”

Ladies and gentlemen, your First Lady of the United States: Melania Trump.


READ: Latinos Are Coping Through This Tumultuous Time In Politics With Laughter

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Here’s How Likely A Massive Deportation Is In The Upcoming Months

politics

Here’s How Likely A Massive Deportation Is In The Upcoming Months

CREDIT: DEMOCRACY NOW

As of today, the U.S. is facing the possibility that 2 million to 3 million immigrants could be immediately deported under the new administration. During a speech in August, Donald Trump explained to followers that there are, “…criminal aliens now inside of our country, 2 million people, criminal aliens.” The process of deportation has been described, on Donald Trump’s personal website, as a “day one” operation, that will be enabled by “local, state, and federal law enforcement.”

Sounds like a big number, but it’s not entirely true.

CREDIT: BORDERANGELSOFFICIAL / INSTAGRAM

As Fox News reported, “criminal aliens” are “criminal and have criminal records, gang, members, drug dealers.” While 2 million to 3 million sound like a lot, the number of “criminal aliens” is around 900,000, according to data analysis from the Migration Policy Institute. That number that was independently backed up by the Pew Research Center. This amount is obviously far less than the estimated 3 million, cited by Trump. So what this means is that the word “criminal” could be reinterpreted to make sure that including the 900k “criminal alien” immigrants facing deportation, we could expect another 1.1. to 2.1 million people to be removed from this country, even if they are not “criminal aliens” under the current definition of the word.

Misconceptions about immigrants.

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As of 2014, there were nearly 11 million immigrants living in the U.S., with the majority of them living in California, Texas, Florida, New York, New Jersey and Illinois. According to the Pew Research Center, the number of immigrants coming to this country has leveled off over the last few years, and those who live here are less likely to commit crimes.

Nearly 52 percent of our country’s immigrants come from Mexico, and according to Politifact, “Mexican men ages 18 to 39, the incarceration rate in 2010 was 2.8 percent, compared to 10.7 percent for native-born men in the same age group.”

The reasons for this are fairly obvious, most immigrants are here to build a “better life” and do not want to risk getting deported for committing a minor offense. They also contribute to nearly 5 percent of the total working force of the United States, and are still outnumbered in all jobs by U.S. citizens.

So, will deportation really happen?


Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan told CNN that President-elect Donald Trump is “not planning on erecting a deportation force.” He went further to reassure citizens that mass deportation is not as important as border security. However, one thing that we can’t take for granted is the fact that immigration was always one of the core elements that defined Trump’s campaign. If he expects to get re-elected, Trump is going to have to deliver on his promises.

What can immigrants do?


If immigrants are afraid of being targeted by authorities — or worse — yeah, they could leave the country and give satisfaction to the people who feel immigration is driving our country’s demise. But that option isn’t realistic and accomplishes nothing anyway. It won’t fix the anger of deportation proponents, and it offers two ugly halves of the same coin: Living in a constant state of fear or proactively upending your life. Another option could be to find the nearest “Sanctuary City” and hope that Trump doesn’t pull funding on that city. If those options seem grim and angst-ridden, it’s because they are. So seek out positive outcomes by aligning with advocacy organizations.

If you or someone you know is concerned about their future in this country, please look into the many organizations we need right now.

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💁We will get through this! ✊❤ #heretostay

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Those include United We Dream, Border Angels, National Network For Immigrant And Refugee Rights, and many others. Please do your own research on this matter and look at the links below for more information.


Read: As Immigration From Mexico Declines, Other Nationalities Are Moving In

[H/T] Remezcla: Feeling Helpless After Trump’s Win? Here Are 10 Organizations You Can Support

[H/T] Latino Rebels: How I Prepared Latino and Muslim ESL Students for the Trump Presidency

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