Things That Matter

Meet The Mexican Robin Hood Who Put Fear In The Heart Of Texans

Orion Pictures

A new Latino USA podcast brings you an epic tale of Wild West justice neatly packed into one man: Juan Cortina.

Credit: @C_historienne / Twitter / Tejano History Curriculum Project / University of Texas

Living along the Texas-Mexico border during the 1800s was the epitome of the Wild West. A man named Juan Nepomuceno Cortina Goseacochea, or Juan Cortina, stood up for Mexicans in the U.S. who were being attacked and intimidated by Texan settlers who were trying to take their land – and their dignity.

Cortina, a landowner with ranches in Mexico and the U.S., started his brand of vigilante justice in 1859 when he launched a takeover of Brownsville, Texas.

Credit: @MOSTHistory / Twitter

Cortina was just taking a ride through town when he saw the Brownsville sheriff pistol whip a Mexican farm worker, who once worked for Cortina. Right then and there, Cortina decided that it was enough. Both Cortina and the sheriff drew their pistols and opened fire on each other. The sheriff missed, but Cortina shot the sheriff’s arm and fled with the farm worker to safety. Soon, Cortina’s Texas ranch was turned into the headquarters for the Mexican landowners fighting against Anglo Texans. Cortina eventually earned the nickname “Rio Grande Robin Hood.”

With his reputation as a badass cemented, Cortina would eventually go on to become the governor of Tamaupilas.

onemanshero
Credit: Orion Pictures

Cortina was also immortalized in the movie, “One Man’s Hero,” which tells the story of the San Patricio Battalion, a group of European (mostly Irish) soldiers who abandoned the U.S. to fight with Mexican troops. Cortina is played by Joaquim de Almeida (the bad guy from “Fast Five”).

Listen to the story of this kick-ass Mexican folk hero below! Skip to 5:13 to hear about Juan Cortina.

Credit: Latino USA NPR

READ: The Border Patrol Did Everything Possible To Protect An Agent Who Killed An Innocent Mexican Kid

(H/T: Latino USA NPR)

Have you ever heard of Juan Cortina, the Rio Grande Robin Hood? Share this story with your friends and get his story out there before history forgets him again.

Foundation Used To Only Have Three Colors, Here’s How We Went From Nudes To Fenty

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Foundation Used To Only Have Three Colors, Here’s How We Went From Nudes To Fenty

@bareminerals

Ah, foundation. Literally the basic building block for most of our beauty routines. It’s been around literally since the early ages and continues to thrive and impact the ways in which beauty brands develop their own platforms. But foundation wasn’t always as inclusive and complex as it used to be While it’s not uncommon to find foundation in it is starkest  blanket shades, literally dubbed light, medium, and dark, beauty brands like Fenty, Estée Lauder and Maybelline New York have all pushed for foundation hues that complement the broad spectrum of skin tones. But how did we make such progress in beauty? And where did foundation originally come from? 

Here’s a brief and insightful look at how foundation became another household item that we cannot live without.

In the beginning, foundation was only for the rich and powerful.

Credit: Twitter/@8intheuniverse

Believe it or not, makeup goes back all the way to Biblical days where it was referred to as “face painting.” Just check out the Old Testament (Ezekiel 23:40). It was also used by rich Romans and Greeks during 200 B.C. However, the practice of using makeup for spectacle purpose could be seen more prominently in the 17th-century by monarchs such as Queen Elizabeth I and in the 18th-century men began to wear it too as made fashionable by Louis XV. Back then, this group of elites would wear foundation while artists painted their portraits as part of s social affairs, and actors would then go onto wear their looks onstage. While the foundation was only worn by the wealthy, the makeup itself was made out of toxic ingredients including zinc oxide, glycerin and calamine lotion.

Foundation, as we know it today, has its roots in Germany and Poland.

Credit: Instagram/@oldhollywoodmoviemagic

Originally, German actor Carl Baudin created greasepaint to use as a tool to use on stage so his wig line would be hidden onstage. The greasepaint was made out of zinc white, ochre, and vermillion in lard. Weird, right? But it worked and he began to sell it. Then in 1914, Polish makeup icon Max Factor created his own formula that was a mix of pigment and lard and invented. Factor created the makeup specifically for actors in Hollywood and it worked so well on film that the product became a hot commodity. The Hollywood industry only used Max Factor foundations on sets. The term people used for the foundation was called pan-cake because of the density of the product but also it wasn’t only in liquid form but packed powder. 

The evolution of foundation in the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s

Credit: Instagram/@monkyboxx

For the most part, foundation just came in three shades, white, medium, and dark, which didn’t leave much room for those of us with a skin tone that didn’t fall into any of those three tones. While cosmetic companies began to manufacture their own foundation, for the average woman the main brands were Maybelline and Cover Girl. Both those brands sold compact powder cases that provided inexpensive coverage that provided coverage for faces. 

Loose powder foundation. Finally a breakthrough!

 Credit: Instagram/@bareminerals

As foundation continues to evolve, we now have foundation that comes in all forms including loose powder. While liquid provides extensive coverage that basically gets applied just like paint, for women who want a natural look can easily turn to loose powder for that flawless look. In the late ’90s Leslie Blodgett, a makeup executive at Bare Escentuals, changed the foundation game when her company created Bare Minerals, released a loose powder foundation that had SPF and other vital minerals for your face. Now every cosmetic company sells their own version of loose foundation powder. 

Foundation for everyone.

Credit: Instagram/@boise.beauty

Foundation has come a long way. It’s not the pan-cake makeup of yesteryear, nor is it made just for the rich and famous. It comes in a variety forms, including liquid, matte, powder, sticks, and so much more. The great thing about this evolving makeup is that it comes in all tones and for all skin types, and it’s no longer made with harmful ingredients. Today, cosmetic companies have found ways to create a product that not only provides coverage but that can also help your skin. There’s a huge portion of the beauty industry that sells products that are vegan, animal-cruelty free and made of organic ingredients. Imagine if Max Factor knew how foundation was made today, he’d probably think you were joking and argue that foundation could not be made without the use of animal lard. The reality is that today trying to choosing which foundation might have become a bit more complex since he started making foundation but as a result, mostly everyone is able to find a brand that works for their skin tone,  beauty standards, and wallet. 

READ: 25 Brands Made For Latinas And Women Of Color That Are Totally Crushing The Beauty Game

Aristemo Will Soon Be Broadcast All Over The US Thanks To Univision Distributing This Gay Love Story

Entertainment

Aristemo Will Soon Be Broadcast All Over The US Thanks To Univision Distributing This Gay Love Story

univision / Instagram

Telenovelas have long been typecasting all the stereotypes we’ve grown up to believe to be true, and then to unlearn all over again. We’ve met the seductress duplicitous female villain, the overreactive, drama queen female ‘lover,’ and the steel-jawed masculine heart-breaker hero who finally finds his integrity and reunites with his inhumanly patient lover. Oh, and all the woman are highly sexualized and overall just the most feminine. Telenovelas have long codified the binary and the love stories of heteros. Not anymore.

Televisa’s El corazón nunca se equivoca (ECNSE) premiered in Mexico earlier this summer, and, now that Univision is picking up the novela, the U.S. is about to get its first-ever gay couple to star in a novela. 

El corazón nunca se equivoca (ECNSE) is the spin-off of novela Mi marido tiene familia that we’ve all been waiting for. 

Credit: @M3li_G3 / Twitter

We got to meet stars Aristóteles “Aris” Córcega (Emilio Osorio) and Cuauhtémoc “Temo” López (Joaquín Bondoni) meet and fall in love in Mi marido tiene familia. That said, they met as teenagers while living under their parents’ ignorant roofs. Now we get to see them build their own lives. Together, the duo has been lovingly dubbed “Aristemo” or “Emiliaco,” depending who you ask.

In Mi marido tiene familia, we watched Aristemo endure a lot of homophobic hate.

Credit: @Itgetsbetter / Twitter

Being gay in a homophobic society is incredibly isolating and dangerous. Suicide rates are nearly twice as high in the LGBTQ+ community than in the hetero community. That’s not because they’re gay. It’s because people are told that “God hates fags.” Fans have been rooting for Aristemo ever since they graced the television screen because they offer hope to all the gay niños out there watching.

ECNSE will follow Aristemo as they move from Oaxaca to Mexico City to follow their passions.

Credit: @Dacaflow / Twitter

Of course, passion ensues. They escape Oaxaca’s brand of homophobia for Mexico City’s brand, but, as is the reality for our LGBTQ+ community, Aristemo finds and cultivates a safe space for them to love each other freely. Instead of sneaking around their parent’s houses, they hide away in their own shared apartment together, free at last.

Claro, leaving the crime scene of their families’ homophobia doesn’t heal those wounds as quickly as they hoped for.

Credit: @ARISTEM0KING / Twitter

You can expect to see a reasonable representation of life for LGBTQ+ youth in Mexico City. LGBT youth are far more likely to experience depression, suicidality and mental illness than hetero folks. Instead of the “happily ever after” ending we typically get from novelas, we get to see a more realistic next chapter in Aristemo’s lives together as they cope with their own depression, suicidal thoughts, and the emotional distress that homophobic political campaigns inflict. 

American fans are emocionada AF.

Credit: @httpTahi / Twitter

This fan took the time to screenshot grabs of an interview with Bondoni and Osorio, because the duo is just as cute off-screen as they are on-screen. “Ay pero bro, que bonito lo miras,” the fan captioned. “EMILIACO EN USA!”

We’re all learning lessons in love from Aristemo.

Credit: @SHIPPERARI / Twitter

Apparently, Aristemo not only goes on to create a safe space for themselves, but they also take in other LGBTQ+ youth. 😭We’ll meet their new friends, Diego (Nikolás Caballero) and Carlota Cervantes (Ale Müller), and watch how this little family learns to take care of each other and unlearn the drama that their families created for them.

The broader Aristemo family diaspora is currently weeping pride tears everywhere.

Credit: @pride_site / Twitter

“I’m so proud and also very excited 🙂 can’t wait for aristemo to make history in the us,” tweets one fan. “Creo que sin importar lo que pase, nos sentimos muy orgullosos,” tweets another. No novela drama we’re about to witness will change how proud we are to finally give this love story the spotlight. Why? Because the heart is never wrong [cries in gay].

America, you can watch El corazón nunca se equivoca on August 13, 2019 at 9p.m., only on Univision.

Credit: @T53657190 / Twitter

It’s prep time, mi gente. Gather your friends, your micheladas and a few Costco sized bags of Fritos, because the emotional eating is about to take over your life. Plus, know that you have 26 episodes to binge, which in novela world, is simply not enough. Still, we’ll take it. Mil gracias, Univision.

READ: Univision Makes History, Announces First Telenovela That Will Star Gay Couple In Leading Role

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