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Meet The Genius Behind These Playfully Creative Photos

For many people, sightseeing means nothing more than pointing a camera and taking a picture. For Brazilian Toninho Euzebio, the process is way more involved.

A photo posted by Toninho Euzebio (@teuzebio) on

Credit: Teuzebio / Instagram

Over the last several years, the artist has spent his time reimagining several of Brazil’s most notable landmarks through a combination of photography and art.

A photo posted by Toninho Euzebio (@teuzebio) on

“In the case of buildings, the first thing I try to do is to study a little of its history and perhaps from there comes an idea,” Toninho told CNN.

A photo posted by Toninho Euzebio (@teuzebio) on

Some photos are playful combinations of beautiful architecture and silly cartoons.

A photo posted by Toninho Euzebio (@teuzebio) on

Other times, his work goes after, well, low-hanging fruit.

A photo posted by Toninho Euzebio (@teuzebio) on

No, seriously, low hanging fruit.

A photo posted by Toninho Euzebio (@teuzebio) on

Whatever his target, Toninho shows us things the average tourist in Brazil will never see.

A photo posted by Toninho Euzebio (@teuzebio) on

“I try to work with whatever is there. (It) can be a statue, a trash can, a tree, well, anything,” Toninho told CNN.

Olha aí @oficialvanessaleao @allendasilva ! Valeu pela oportunidade!!

A photo posted by Toninho Euzebio (@teuzebio) on

Thankfully, Toninho Euzebio has been gracious enough to catalogue the creation of his artwork on Instagram, which you can check out here.

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The Last Wild Macaw In Rio de Janeiro Visits the Zoo Everyday Because She’s Lonely

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The Last Wild Macaw In Rio de Janeiro Visits the Zoo Everyday Because She’s Lonely

via Getty Images

If you’re the type of person who constantly complains about being single, this story will most definitely resonate with you. In Rio de Janeiro, there is a macaw that experts believe is the only free macaw currently living in Rio. To make things more tragic, this Brazilian macaw is so lonely that she makes daily visits to her fellow macaws at Rio de Janeiro’s zoo.

Every morning, a blue-and-yellow macaw (affectionately named Juliet) flies into the enclosure where the zoo’s macaw lives and canoodles with her fellow species.

According to the staff of the Rio de Janeiro Zoo, Juliet has been making daily visits to the enclosure for 20 years. The last time a blue-and-yellow macaw like Juliet was seen in the wild was in 1818. So it’s safe to say she’s fiending for some company. The average lifespan of a macaw is 35-years, which means Juliet has spent the majority of her life as a single lady.

“They’re social birds, and that means they don’t like to live alone, whether in nature or captivity. They need company,” said Neiva Guedes, president of the Hyacinth Macaw Institute, to the Associated Press. “[Juliet] very probably feels lonely, and for that reason goes to the enclosure to communicate and interact.”

Luckily for Juliet, the Rio de Janeiro Zoo is launching a program called Refauna that is aiming to breed and reintroduce blue-and-yellow macaws back into the wild.

The Refauna program plans to breed 20 macaw chicks and give them “training” on “forest food sources, the peril of predators and avoidance of power lines.” Once they’re thoroughly educated, workers will release the birds into the Tijuca Forest National Park to live full, free lives. Some people are hoping that with so many macaws flying free out in the open, Juliet will feel less lonely.

But some animal experts are warning the general public not to feel too bad for Juliet. “We don’t want to project human feelings,” biologist Angelita Capobianco told AP News. I look at the animal, and see an animal at ease.” That’s nice to hear. We love a strong, independent woman who doesn’t need a man to thrive.

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NFTs: What Are They And What To Do With Them

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NFTs: What Are They And What To Do With Them

Non Fungible Tokens, or NFTs, have been all over the news lately. The latest version of digital currency is having a moment as everyone gets in on the craze. Here’s a quick breakdown on what they are, how you can get one, and what to do with them.

The world is buzzing about non-fungible tokens.

NFTs are the latest craze in digital currency. Superficially, it looks no different than buy art digitally. NFTs are unlike other forms of cryptocurrency in that they are blockchain-based assets. People are able to exchange Bitcoins with other Bitcoins or equivalent amounts in other digital currency. This is not the case for NFTs. NFTs are unique to themselves. This gives people the chance to own a specific token.

The owner of the digital image can then resell the image for a profit or a loss based on the future of the market. This means that the NFT you buy today could bring in a big profit or a breathtaking loss.

There is a lot of concern about the environmental impact creating the NFT community is causing. According to The New York Times, studies are showing that creating digital art to sell as NFTs is creating large carbon footprints that are negatively impacting the environment. Some in the community are looking for a solution while others think there is no changing the environmental impact.

There is still a lot of debate about how NFTs really work.

There is one explanation that is going viral on Twitter and has caused a whole discussion about what NFTs really are and how they are valued. Like all sellable items, NFTs get their value from supply and demand. Their irreproducibility adds to their value because it is a unique item that only you own, much like a piece of art.

The first high-profile piece of art to sell as an NFT was Mike Winkelmann’s “Everydays: The First 5000 Days.” Winkelmann, also known as the digital artist Beeple, created a new piece of art every day for more than 13 years. The collage of these pieces of work sold by Christie’s for $69,346,250. The buyer was Vignesh Sundaresan, the founder of the Metapurse NFT project.

Yet, it is important to know that buying an NFT gives you ownership of the art, not the copyright.

“I think that people don’t understand that when you buy, you have the token [or NFT]. You can display the token and show you own the token, but, you don’t own the copyright,” Winkelmann, told CNBC Make It.

NFTs are part of the Ethereum blockchain.

As the popularity of NFTs continues to spike, so does the value of Ethereum. This means that if you want to get serious about the NFT investments you are seeing, you should consider getting yourself some Ethereum.

You can set up an account on Coinbase to start buying Ethereum if you are interested in joining in on the craze. Coinbase is a digital space where you can trade cryptocurrency.

If you want to get more into NFTs, check out mitú’s NFTs on OpenSea.

mitú is offering three different NFTs of the beloved Guacardo. The animated avocado is being sold in three “Lord of the Rings” inspired images. The bidding starts at 0.1 Ethereums (about $27). You can see the images on the mitú OpenSea page where the bidding has begun.

READ: Do You Combine Finances With Your Spouse? Latinas Answered!

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