Things That Matter

Meet 8 Latino Politicians Who Are Getting Ready To Fight Against Trump

@Nanette4CA / Twitter / @stevhar54 / Twenty20 / @RubenKihuen / Twitter

The new Congressional class has been sworn in and Latinos can celebrate some historical firsts. There are eight new Latino politicians walking the halls of Congress and among them are the first Latina Senator ever elected and the first Dominican-American Congressman ever elected. Here are the eight new Latinos ready to work for their constituents.

1. Rep. Darren Soto, D-Fla.


Representative Darren Soto made history by becoming the first ever Puerto Rican elected to Congress from the state of Florida. Soto is representing Florida’s 9th district, which covers parts of southern Orlando, Kissimmee, and Winter Haven, and has a large Puerto Rican population. According to NBC News, the demographic for Florida’s 9th Congressional district is about 40 percent Puerto Rican.

“I talked about the things we care about,” Soto told FOX News. “The whole Central Florida community wants to see recovery in Puerto Rico. They are a strong trading partner with us. We believe that increased prosperity in Puerto Rico will increase prosperity in Central Florida.”

2. Rep. Adriano Espaillat, D-NY


Representative Adriano Espaillat has made history by being the first elected Dominican-American to Congress in U.S. history. Espaillat is also the first formerly undocumented immigrant to ever be elected to the U.S. Congress. Espaillat will be representing New York’s 13th Congressional district, which is a very diverse district covering Harlem, Washington Heights, and Inwood.

“I will become the first Dominican-American to ever serve in the U.S. Congress,” Espaillat told that crowd at the Democratic National Convention. “Perhaps even just as important, I will be the first member of Congress who was once undocumented as an immigrant. You take that, Donald Trump!”

3. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nev.


Senator Catherine Cortez-Masto has the honor of being the first Latina ever elected to the Senate. During her campaign, Cortez Masto spoke passionately about immigration reform and standing up for working families.

“To me, it’s having a seat at the table,” Cortez Masto told NPR about being the first Latina Senator after her win. “It’s being a voice and having a different perspective and bringing that voice to the table to fight for issues that I know are important for not just people in Nevada but across this country. It is young women, young girls, that now know and see somebody in a position that they think that they can achieve.”

4. Rep. Vicente Gonzalez, D-Texas


Representative Vicente Gonzalez was elected to represent the 15th district of Texas, which stretches from Seguin to McAllen. Gonzalez beat Republican Tim Westley for the Texas Congressional seat 57.3 percent to 37.7 percent. For Gonzalez, the greatest issue is making sure college and higher education are affordable and attainable for all.

“We need to find a way to let them go to school and not come out with the burden of debt,” Gonzalez said, according to RGVProud. And I have a plan for the first two years of college to be debt-free, and you get a great return nationally, by having this brain power that we create. So I encourage that. And we need to find ways to have head start and Pre-K programs fully funded.”

5. Rep. Nanette Barragán, D-Calif.


Representative Nanette Barragán won a very hard fought election against Isadore Hall who had the backing of Governor Jerry Brown, Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom and former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. In the end, Barragan beat Hall by earning 51.2 percent of the vote. Barragán is representing the 44th congressional district of California which includes Compton, Carson and San Pedro.

“I think the first thing I feel is pride that, once again, I beat the odds,” Barragán told Daily Breeze, referencing her upbringing by undocumented immigrant parents. “That’s been my life story. It’s even more meaningful to be able to go serve in Congress at a time when we have a new president coming who doesn’t think immigrants provide value.”

6. Rep. Lou Correa, D-Calif.


Representative Lou Correa will be representing California’s 46th Congressional district, which includes Santa Ana and Anaheim. Correa is going to Congress prepared to fight against Trump’s plans for mass deportations. But, more importantly, Correa wants his story to be one of hope to anyone in the nation that is growing up in a lower socio-economic standing to know that nothing is out of reach.

“To me, it’s a testament to the greatness of this country, where a person that grew up in this neighborhood can actually make it to the U.S. Congress,” Correa told the LA Times about the Penguin City barrio, the neighborhood in which he grew up.

7. Rep. Ruben Kihuen, D-Nev.


Representative Ruben Kihuen is a Mexican immigrant born in Guadalajara who moved to the U.S. when he was 8 years old. Kihuen is another first as he takes to Congress as the first Latino elected in the state of Nevada for such a position. He will be representing Nevada’s 4th Congressional district, which covers most of southern Nevada.

“It’s my job to continue to fight to make life better for working families and people like my parents so that everyone has a fair shot at the American Dream,” Kihuen said in a statement, according to News 3 Las Vegas.

8. Rep. Salud Carbajal, D-Calif.


Representative Salud Carbajal will be representing California’s 24th Congressional district, which includes Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Paso Robles. Since the beginning of the legislative session, Carbajal has already voiced his belief in political accountability by voting against the gutting the Independent Ethics Committee.

“As this session of Congress is called to order, I’m incredibly honored and humbled to have the opportunity to represent the hardworking families of California’s 24th Congressional District,” Carbajal said in a statement, according to Noozhawk. “This Congress brings with it an unprecedented set of challenges, but I am committed to providing increased economic opportunity and a better future for communities across the Central Coast.”


READ: We Didn’t Elect The First Woman President, But We Elected The First Latina Senator

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After Racist Chants At A Trump Rally Directed At Rep. Omar, Cardi B Has Come Out Supporting The Congresswoman

Entertainment

After Racist Chants At A Trump Rally Directed At Rep. Omar, Cardi B Has Come Out Supporting The Congresswoman

@ilhanmn Instagram / Presley Ann / Stringer Getty Images

As President Trump continues to lead a national racist attack on progressive Rep. Ilhan Omar, Cardi B showed her support for the Minnesota congresswoman with a simple Instagram post.

Within hours, #IStandWithIlhan was trending on Twitter, with public figures and fellow politicians weighing in.

Cardi B was one of the very first people to show her support for Omar.

In typical badass fashion, the “Press” singer quoted Beyonce when posting in support of Omar on Instagram, sharing a photo and writing, “You know you that b**** when you cause all this conversation.”

This is not the first time this week Cardi B, born Belcalis Almánzar, has weighed in on politics. The Bronx-born rapper tweeted Tuesday that she was “really sad” that Democratic voters “let down” Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) during the 2016 presidential primary.

She wrote that the senator has “been fighting for equal rights, HUMAN rights for such along time.”

“Seeing this country become a better place been really his passion for a long time not a new front for a campaign,” she added.

Cardi B’s appreciation post comes after a disgusting rally where Trump continued with his racist rhetoric.

Credit: @AlmaNiqabae / Twitter

Trump held a “Make America Great Again” rally in Greeneville, North Carolina. During the rally, Trump continued to rant against Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressly and Rashia Tlaib, who have become known as “the squad.”

“Let ’em leave… they’re always telling us how to run it, how to do this, how to do that. You know what? If they don’t love it, tell ’em to leave it,” Trump said of the congresswomen.

Although Trump spent time going after each woman individually, only his attack on Omar elicited an offensive chant from the crowd.

“Omar smeared U.S. service members in ‘Black Hawk Down.’ She slandered the brave Americans trying to keep peace in Somalia,” Trump said of Omar.

Trump paused his speech to let the chant continue.

The president also claimed Omar blamed America for the economic crisis in Venezuela and she refused to condemn Al Qaeda. As the president ripped into Omar, people in the crowd began chanting “send her back” in the same way that they chanted “lock her up” during his campaign against Hillary Clinton.

After, Omar responded to the chants at the rally by tweeting, “I am where I belong, at the people’s house and you’re just gonna have to deal!” along with a photo of her on the House floor.

Cardi B fans have been stanning extra hard after her post.

Credit: @yashar / Twitter

To see this strong woman of color come to defend one of Trump’s most vocal opponents sent me any people into a frenzy. Her tweet was simple yet totally summed up what so many of us are thinking and feeling.

I mean she quoted the Queen Bey in her post. Like OMG.

That is some mad stanning right there. Quoting Beyonce lyrics to support a woman of color suffering racist attacks from the President of the United States and his supporters…it doesn’t get more powerful than that.

Cardi B’s favored presidential candidate always weighed in on Trump’s remarks about Omar.

Credit: @SenSanders / Twitter

Cardi B has been pretty vocal about her support of Bernie Sanders for president. She recently said about Bernie, “Seeing this country become a better place been really his passion for a long time not a new front for a campaign.”

READ: Cardi B Stands Behind Bernie Sanders Because Of His Desire To Fight For All People And Their Rights

AOC Is Teaming Up With Other Congresswomen To Give Domestic Workers Equal Employee Rights And We Are Here For This

Things That Matter

AOC Is Teaming Up With Other Congresswomen To Give Domestic Workers Equal Employee Rights And We Are Here For This

@domesticworkers / Twitter

After over a decade of lobbying, The National Domestic Workers Alliance’s (NDWA) work is on the verge of paying off. This week, Representative Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) and Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) introduced legislation that would establish the first-ever National Domestic Workers Bill of Rights. 

The bill would effectively include domestic workers as worthy of the same rights as other American workers–including “paid overtime, safe and healthy working conditions, meal and rest breaks, earned sick time, and freedom for workplace harassment,” according to NDWA.

Rep. Pramila Jayapal is leading the charge to ensure this bill is passed into law.

Credit: @RepJayapal / Twitter

“Did you know most domestic workers are not covered by federal anti-discrimination and sexual harassment laws? Well we’re pushing back to change that,” tweets Rep. Jayapal. “My #DomesticWorkersBillofRights will give domestic workers the protections they deserve!”

The bill would grant basic worker’s rights to 2.5 million people in the U.S.

Credit: @domesticworkers / Twitter

Of those 2.5 million people, 91 percent are women, mostly women of color. Given that domestic workers aren’t required to be paid even minimum wage, and that their work doesn’t include benefits like health insurance, it’s important to make sure every worker earns a living wage. According to NDWA, 70 percent of domestic workers are paid less than $13 an hour.

The workers who do the heavy lifting in the shadows of our economy may finally be recognized as worthy of rights.

Credit: @domesticworkers / Twitter

NDWA has worked hard over the years to make it easier for domestic workers (home care workers, nannies and house cleaners). They even created a web app that would allow clients to contribute to a PTO and benefit fund for domestic workers. This bill would ensure that the government is advocating for every worker, so that domestic workers don’t have to fight so hard to advocate for themselves.

Members of the group broke off to meet with their representative.

Credit: @domesticworkers / Twitter

“We had a powerful meeting with @timkaine where our members in Virginia shared stories about abuse and exploitation in the workplace,” the organization tweeted. “Every single worker deserves to work safely and with dignity. Onward to a National #DomesticWorkersBillOfRights!”

The group met with AOC, who opened up about how the bill would help “little girls like [her].”

Credit: @domesticworkers / Twitter

“My mom was a domestic worker,” she tells the group. “As a child I grew up reading books on the staircases of other people’s homes, and doing homework on other people’s dinner tables, because my mom was pursuing domestic work so that I could go on field trips and have a future.”

For AOC, this bill is about reparations for a group of people who often go unseen in this world.

Credit: @domesticworkers / Twitter

She praised the group for their advocacy, saying, “When you all are fighting for this, you’re fighting for little girls like me. You’re putting a shirt on a little girl like me’s back. I can’t tell you the reparations it has to see people who are used to being unseen and that’s what this bill does.”

The group also live-tweeted a conversation between several domestic workers and Rep. Jayapal.

Credit: @domesticworkers / Twitter

The stories were shocking. A nanny named Thaty shared her experience, saying that “being a nanny takes so much hard work. I don’t know many people who can handle caring for 5 kids under 5 years old! But our work is still considered unskilled. We need to bring our work out of the shadows — so everyone can know what we do and how hard we work.”

Jayapal touched on something deeper than granting legal rights–this issue is about overdue respect.

Credit: @domesticworkers / Twitter

So many families rely on domestic workers to come home to a clean home, safe and cared-for children, and more. They’re often not seen as employees but rather, “the help.”

But “The Help” encounter medical issues and injuries while on the job, without any legal protections.

Credit: @domesticworkers / Twitter

Domestic workers are not included in federal protections for workers injured while on the job. So when Sylvia shared that she never fully recovered from a bad fall on the job, and though it impedes her ability to continue to work, she just has to grimace through it.

That same Sylvia is an inspiration. She told Rep. Jayapal that her experience “meeting workers who felt too vulnerable at work to raise their own voices forced me to be brave enough to raise my own voice, for me and for them. That’s why I’m part of the National Domestic Workers Alliance.”

We’re rooting for you!

Credit: @domesticworkers / Twitter

As Latinos, so many of our own moms, tías or abuelas have driven this industry that, frankly, serves as the backbone to our economy. They offer support to middle and upper-class families who have money but don’t have time, and their work supports our families. Time to give some respect.

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