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One Of Mexico’s Most Iconic Actors Just Died And People Are Losing It

Mexico is mourning one of its biggest loss with the passing of Mario Almada, a legendary figure in the Mexican film industry who passed away Tuesday night in Cuernavaca, Morelos due to a respiratory failure. He was 94.

“He wasn’t sick,” said Almada’s daughter in law, Teresa Rivero to El Universal. “He died in peace, without suffering. Just as he deserved it,” she assured.

Almada, who began his film trajectory in 1935 at 13 years old, was known for his roles in action pictures and urban westerns. He was usually the hero, portraying cops, sergeants, and sheriffs. OC Weekly said, “he was Clint Eastwood, John Wayne, Charles Bronson, Dolemite, and Billy Jack rolled into one grizzled, taciturn, Stetson-wearing, gun-slinging viejo abrón.”

credit: tumblr / @vandalvangough

With a prosperous career than spanned more than seven decades, Almada participated in over 300 films shot on 35 mm.

“That’s just counting films shot on film. I’m not counting videohomes. I’ve probably acted in more than 1,000 of those,” he told VICE in 2009.

At the time of the interview, Almada allegedly held the Guinness World Record for the living actor who’s appeared in the most movies.

Almada’s most popular films include: “Todo por nada” (1968), “El tunco Maclovio” (1970), “La viuda negra” (1977), and “Tacos de oro” (1985). He also collaborated many times with Los Tigres del Norte, in films such as “La Banda del Carro Rojo” (1978) and “La Camioneta Gris” (1990).

Most recently, he portrayed a godfather in the 2006 film “Bajo la misma luna” starring Kate del Castillo and Eugenio Derbez. In 2013, Almada received the lifetime achievement award at Premios Ariel, considered the most prestigious award in the Mexican movie industry. In addition to acting, Almada was also a director, writer and film producer.

Read more about Mario Almada, here

READ: People On Twitter Can’t Handle Juan Gabriel’s Death… And We Totally Relate

What is your favorite Mario Almada movie? Let us know in the comments below.

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Mexicans Travel To U.S. For ‘Vaccine Tourism’ Say It’s A Matter Of Survival

Things That Matter

Mexicans Travel To U.S. For ‘Vaccine Tourism’ Say It’s A Matter Of Survival

The United States is one of the world’s most successful countries when it comes to rolling out the COVID-19 vaccine program. So far, more than 200 million vaccines have been administered across the U.S. and as of this week anyone over the age of 16 is now eligible.

Meanwhile, in many countries around the world – including Mexico – the vaccine roll out is still highly restricted. For many, who can afford to travel, they see the best option at a shot in the arm to take a trip to the U.S. where many locations are reporting a surplus in vaccines.

Wealthy Latin Americans travel to U.S. to get COVID vaccines.

People of means from Latin America are chartering planes, booking commercial flights, buying bus tickets and renting cars to get the vaccine in the United States due to lack of supply back in their home countries. Some of those making the trip include politicians, TV personalities, business executives and a soccer team.

There is an old Mexican joke: God tells a Mexican he has only a week left to live but can ask for one final wish, no matter how outrageous. So the Mexican asks for a ticket to Houston—for a second opinion.

Virginia Gónzalez and her husband flew from Mexico to Texas and then boarded a bus to a vaccination site. They made the trip again for a second dose. The couple from Monterrey, Mexico, acted on the advice of the doctor treating the husband for prostate cancer. In all, they logged 1,400 miles for two round trips.

“It’s a matter of survival,” Gónzalez told NBC News, of getting a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. “In Mexico, officials didn’t buy enough vaccines. It’s like they don’t care about their citizens.”

Mexico has a vaccine rollout plan but it’s been too slow in many people’s opinions.

With a population of nearly 130 million people, Mexico has secured more vaccines than many Latin American nations — about 18 million doses as of Monday from the U.S., China, Russia and India. Most of those have been given to health care workers, people over 60 and some teachers, who so far are the only ones eligible. Most other Latin American countries, except for Chile, are in the same situation or worse.

So vaccine seekers who can afford to travel are coming to the United States to avoid the long wait, including people from as far as Paraguay. Those who make the trip must obtain a tourist visa and have enough money to pay for required coronavirus tests, plane tickets, hotel rooms, rental cars and other expenses.

There is little that is fair about the global race for the COVID-19 vaccine, despite international attempts to avoid the current disparities. In Israel, a country of 9 million people, half of the population has received at least one dose, while plenty of countries have yet to receive any. While the U.S. could vaccinate 70 percent of its population by September 2021 at the current rollout rate, it could take Mexico until approximately the year 2024 to achieve the same results.

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Family Of Man Who Died From Taco Eating Contest Sue Fresno Grizzlies Owner

Entertainment

Family Of Man Who Died From Taco Eating Contest Sue Fresno Grizzlies Owner

Dana Hutchings, 41, entered a taco eating contest during a Fresno Grizzlies game in 2019. He choked and died during the contest and now his son has filed a lawsuit against the baseball team.

The son of a man who died from a taco eating contest is suing for wrongful death.

Dana Hutchings, 41, died after choking during a taco eating contest during a Fresno Grizzlies game. His son has filed a wrongful death lawsuit claiming that the event organizers were not equipped to host the event. Furthermore, the lawsuit claims that the organizers failed to provide a medical response team.

“People say all the time he knew what he was getting into, well clearly he didn’t,” Martin Taleisnik, an attorney representing Hutchings’ son, Marshall told CBS17.

Marshall and his attorney are pushing back at the notion that Dana should have known better.

People have sounded off on social media criticizing the family for filing the lawsuit. Yet, the family and their attorney are calling attention to the lack of information given to contestants.

“If you don’t know all the pitfalls, how can you truly be consenting and participating freely and voluntarily? It’s a risk that resulted in a major loss to Marshall,” Taleisnik told CBS17.

Dana’s family is seeking a monetary settlement from the Fresno Grizzlies owners.

The wrongful death lawsuit names Fresno Sports and Events as the responsible party. The lawsuit also notes that alcohol was made available to contestants and added to the likelihood of the tragedy.

“We are devastated to learn that the fan that received medical attention following an event at Tuesday evening’s game has passed away. The Fresno Grizzlies extend our heartfelt prayers and condolences to the family of Mr. Hutchings,” a statement from the Fresno Grizzlies read after the death in 2019. “The safety and security of our fans is our highest priority. We will work closely with local authorities and provide any helpful information that is requested.”

READ: Kobe Bryant’s Wrongful Death Lawsuit Has Tragically Been Moved To Federal Court Despite Vanessa Bryant’s Pleas

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