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Marco Rubio May Lose the Kid Vote after Hitting a Boy with Football

As all the Republican candidates descended on Iowa, there was a mad dash to make their visit stand out. Donald Trump took kids on helicopter rides and told them he is Batman, former HP CEO Carly Fiorina made a speech on crony capitalism, and Florida Senator Marco Rubio played a little pigskin with a junior supporter.

Too bad Rubio’s hook became a flop when he pegged this kid in the face with a football.

Can we get a second look?

Twitter users offered their own analysis of the play.

https://twitter.com/BA_Friedman/status/633671880449376256

Questions were raised about Rubio’s leadership skills.

And others had some fun with the footage.

One thing is sure…

Credit: YouFirstNews / YouTube

Both Rubio and the kid felt this pass the next morning. Better luck next time.

What do you think about Marco Rubio’s football pass? mitú wants to know. Tell us in the comments below!

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All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Entertainment

All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Netflix continues to churn out powerful films in countries around the world and their latest venture, a look into the life of Brazilian footballer Pelé is another hit. Sure, Pelé may be considered the world’s best soccer player ever but his place in Brazilian history is less clear – at least according to the new doc.

Filmmakers David Tryhorn and Ben Nicholas spent hours in Pelé’s company interviewing him on everything from a childhood spent in poverty to his numerous affairs and his controversial relationship with the authoritarian regime that ruled Brazil during his playing career. Here are some of the key takeaways from this must watch documentary.

Pelé was criticized for not taking a political stance during Brazil’s authoritarian regime.

In 1964, the Brazilian military staged a coup, which led to a dictatorship being established in the country that lasted until 1985. The military government relied on torture and repression to maintain power.

In the film, Pelé is asked whether he knew about these practices at the time.

“If I were to say now that I had never been aware of it, that would be a lie,” he says. “There was a lot we never got to find out, but there were many stories too.”

However, the film paints him as taking a neutral stance throughout, never criticising the regime. Former team-mate Paulo Cezar Lima – aka Caju – doesn’t forgive him.

“I love Pele but that won’t stop me criticizing him. I thought his behavior was that of a black man who says ‘yes sir’,” said Caju. “A submissive black man. It’s a criticism I hold against him until this day, because just one statement from Pelé would have gone a long way.”

The government may have interfered with the Brazilian team.

A dejected Pele leaves the field at Goodison Park after being beaten 3-1 by Portugal, 1966.

The film paints a picture of how national team’s exploits were used to launder the reputation of the military regime during the 1960s. Before the 1970 World Cup, a journalist and friend of Pelé’s describes how it became very important for the regime’s international image that Brazil win the World Cup again. And that meant Pele had to play.

“Winning the World Cup became a governmental matter,” Kfouri says. “The team staff were almost entirely made up of military personnel.”

Manager Joao Saldanha appears to have been fired in the lead-up to the 1970 World Cup for criticizing the Brazilian president, telling a reporter: “I don’t pick his ministers and he doesn’t pick my team. That way we understand each other well.”

Pelé wanted to quit after the 1966 World Cup.

Credit: Pelé / Netflix

In the 1966 World Cup, Brazil was considered a favorite to win, having won the competition four years earlier in Chile. However, there was a massive shock when they were knocked out in the group stages.

“Getting knocked out of the World Cup in England was the saddest moment of my life,” Pelé says. In the film, he tells a reporter: “I don’t intend to play in any more World Cups, because I’m not lucky in them. This is the second World Cup where I have been injured after only two games.”

He played one more World Cup – the 1970 tournament in Mexico, which Brazil won. He’s still the only player to have won three World Cup trophies.

And he admits it was hard for him to stay faithful.

Stores of Pelé’s alleged infidelities and wild romances were common in the tabloids. By 1958, he was a global icon and football’s first millionaire while still only a teenager. And his fans followed him everywhere so it’s hardly a secret that Pelé did not show the same faithfulness to everyone in his life as he did to his club Santos.

At one point in the film, a journalist asks Pelé whether he found it difficult to remain faithful with the amount of women flirting with him.

“In all honesty, it was,” he says, “I’ve had a few affairs, some of which resulted in children, but I only learned about them later. My first wife knew all about it, I never lied to anyone.”

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Argentine Soccer Legend Diego Maradona Dies at 60; Fans Grieve

Entertainment

Argentine Soccer Legend Diego Maradona Dies at 60; Fans Grieve

Photo by Marcelo Endelli/Getty Images

Legendary Argentine soccer player Diego Maradona is dead from a heart attack. He was 60 years old.

On Wednesday, the the Argentine Football Association announced through Twitter that it “expresses its deepest sorrow for the death of our legend, Diego Armando Maradona. You will always be in our hearts.”

Diego Maradona is considered by many to be the greatest soccer player of all time.

When he was just 18 years old, Maradona led Argentina to a youth World Cup Victory in 1986 and played in four more World Cups after that.

It was at the ’86 World Cup that he was catapulted into global stardom for scoring a goal that would be known afterwards as the “Hand of God”. Maradona led his team to victory over England by jumping over a goalkeeper and punching the ball into the net. Afterward, he described what drove the goal: “It was a little bit with the head and a bit with the hand of God.”

After, Maradona moved to Naples, which would become his adopted home town. He solidified his superstar status by helping the struggling Naples Club clinch its first Italian league title in 1987. A second followed in 1990.

But El Pibe de Oro was as famous for his excesses as he was for his talent. He publicly struggled with drug addiction and personal crises throughout his career and after it. Post-retirement, his health suffered.

Earlier this month, Maradona had underwent an operation to remove a blood clot from his brain. Shortly after, he was admitted to a rehab center to treat his alcohol addiction. On October 25th, he died of a heart attack in his home in Tigre, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

In the wake of Maradona’s death, there has been an outpouring of grief from fans, peers, and rivals alike.

Cristiano Ronaldo took to Twitter to express his feelings about the death of a global superstar.

“Today I say goodbye to a friend and the world says goodbye to an eternal genius,” wrote Ronaldo. “One of the best ever. An unparalleled magician. He leaves too soon, but leaves a limitless legacy and a void that will never be filled. Rest in peace, crack. You will never be forgotten.”

Famous Brazilian forward Pelé also wrote a touching tribute to him on Twitter.

“What sad news,” wrote Pelé. “I lost a great friend and the world lost a legend. There is still much to be said, but for now, may God give strength to his family. One day, I hope we can play ball together in heaven.”

Fellow Argentine superstar Leo Messi posted a touching tribute to Maradona on Instagram.

The two players have always drawn parallels because of their country of origin.

Maradona’s adopted stadium of San Paolo in Naples lit up in memoriam of their greatest player.

The entire sports world grieves at the passing of such a legend. Rest in peace, Diego.

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