Lowriders have Gone Global

lowrider credit: CREDIT: ESTEBAN ORIOL /THE NEW YORK TIMES

 

Homies Car Club at the Machine Age Shop in Japan
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CREDIT: ESTEBAN ORIOL /THE NEW YORK TIMES

All of these countries have lowriders that look identical to the ones in East L.A. Just like the ones that emerged in the 1940s and ‘50s as a Mexican-American subculture post World War II. The lowriders have those infamous hydraulics that make the cars dance from side to side or up and down, the velvet upholstery and the all-too-famous murals of the sexy chicas or la Virgen de Guadalupe.

“People make whatever your imagination can build,” said Hanko Hernandez, a custom car painter and owner of Hankos Kustom shop. “It’s really an art form. It’s style more than anything else.”

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CREDIT: ESTEBAN ORIOL /THE NEW YORK TIMES

Brazil has perhaps the most prominent scene where people have adopted the fashion and lowrider style seamlessly. “One thing I like about it in Brazil is they look tough, but they are so nice,” said photographer Pep Williams. “Creased pants, khakis sagging — but they are hugging you. It’s pretty cool. They have red rags, blue rags, but they don’t know you’re supposed to be enemies.”

Read what other have to say about the global lowrider style here.

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