Culture

Listen As This Latina Explains The Difference Between Appropriation And Appreciation

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“When I was younger, I was constantly mocked for having crazy-thick sideburns. But everything I got made fun of for back then is trendy now.”

TeenVogue recently published a very cool series of videos featuring seven young women talking about their respective cultures’ concepts of beauty, grooming, and adornment. They showed how different styles look when they haven’t been appropriated by others, and what these different looks mean to them.

Leaf McLean, a Puerto Rican Afro-Latina from Brooklyn, talked about her ‘crazy-thick sideburns’ – which she rocks impeccably, btw.

?Goddess?

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Creidt: @itsmeleaf / Instagram

“Being Afro-Latina, you have a lot of hair,” she tells TeenVogue. “When I was younger, I was constantly mocked for having crazy-thick sideburns. But everything I got made fun of for back then is trendy now.”


Leaf goes on to define cultural appreciation (as opposed to appropriation) as “giving credit to a long line of people who have done this for years,” adding that part of embracing her heritage meant embracing her hair.


Check out TeenVogue’s full post here to learn more about Leaf’s style, from her earrings to her braids, plus gain insight from 6 other young women on the stories behind their looks.


WATCH: 100 Years of Dominican Beauty

What’s your relationship to your hair these days, and was it always a good one? 

Beauty Brands Are Looking To Shimmers And Illuminators To Attract Black Buyers

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Beauty Brands Are Looking To Shimmers And Illuminators To Attract Black Buyers

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In case you haven’t heard, body glow is the new beauty trend that’s sweeping the nation. Yes, moisturizing is still important, but having dewy skin that looks both effervescent and sun-kissed is the look of the moment. Instagram is alight with girls posing during #goldenhour with their shoulders, cleavage, and clavicles positively glowing with shimmer and light.

We’ve compiled a list of all of the body highlighters, shimmers, and illuminators on the market to fulfill all of your glow-y needs. Take a look below.

1. Fenty Body Lava

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Possibly the singular product that started the body glow trend, Fenty by Rihanna’s Body Lava is the product to have on your shelf this summer. Be sure to buy it soon, because the product is limited edition. Purchase here.

2. L’Oreal Paris True Match Lumi Glotion

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L’Oreal Paris recently got into the glow-game with the launch of their “Lumi” line which focuses on providing its wearer with “the illusion of dewy skin and a natural glow” that looks like it comes from within. Use their Glotion product on your face or on your body. Buy here or at any local drugstore.

3. Huda Beauty N.Y.M.P.H.

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Cleverly named “Not. Your. Mama’s. Panty. Hose.” in reference to the limb-cloaking capabilities of this all-over body highlighter, NYMPH is a water-based formula that melts seamlessly into the skin. Buy here.

4. Patrick Ta Major Glow Body Oil

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Patrick Ta’s Major Glow Body Oil is a high-end product that delivers on its steeper price tag. Packed with nourishing ingredients such as stabilized Vitamin C and squalane, this product promises to give you a short-term and long-lasting glow. Buy here.

5. Sol Body Shimmering Dry Oil

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Sol Body Shimmering Dry Oil is the affordable, vegan, and paraben-free body oil that you didn’t know you’ve been waiting for. Just one of the latest of the groundbreaking lines from the ColourPop founders, Sol Body is set to launch on July 17th. Buy here.

6. Anastasia Beverly Hills Shimmer Body Oil

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Anastasia Beverly Hills always delivers high-quality makeup products and her Shimmer Body Oil is no exception. Buy here.

7. Kora Organics Sun-Kissed Body Glow Oil

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Founded by supermodel Miranda Kerr, Kora Organics prides itself on using all-natural ingredients, including in this body oil that “instantly delivers a subtle sunkissed glow while deeply hydrating”. Buy here.

8. Morroccanoil Shimmering Body Oil

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Morroccanoil uses the nourishing power of Argan Oil to beautify its customers. Not only does their Shimmering Body Oil give skin a touch of luminosity, but it also “infuses skin with a deeply nourishing blend of antioxidant-rich argan oil and sesame oil”. Buy here.

9. Sol De Janeiro Glowmotions

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Named after the sun in the beautiful capital of Brazil, Sol De Janeiro made a name for itself with its famous “Bum Bum Cream”. They recently expanded into body highlighters with their popular Glowmotions Glow Oil that gives the skin an inimitable healthy glow. Buy here.

10. Nuxe Huile Prodigieuse Golden Shimmer

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A staple of the modern French woman, NUXE’s Huile Prodigieuse Golden Shimmer is both ultra-hydrating and super flattering to the skin. Buy here.

11. Charlotte Tilbury Supermodel Body

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Charlotte Tilbury’s beauty line is a favorite of makeup fanatics everywhere, so it follows that her body highlighter would also be a fan-favorite. Buy the “slimming hydrating body shimmer” here.

12. Becca Glow Body Stick

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In a departure from the other liquid-based body highlighters on the list, Becca’s Glow Body Stick is also hydrating, and is infused with “skin nourishing ingredients like Shea Butter and Coconut Oil” .Buy here.

13. Ouai Hair & Body Shine Mist

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Unlike other highlighters that must be applied manually to the skin, Ouai’s Hair & Body Shine Mist can be sprayed on. Not to mention, it works on hair and skin. What’s not to love? Buy here.

14. Pacifica Crystal Bronze Shimmering Body Oil

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Not only is Pacifica is a 100% Vegan & Cruelty-Free line, but they now offer their own Crystal Bronze Shimmering Body Oil that comes with a “kiss of shimmer and major hydration”. Buy here.

15. Lorac Glow & Behold

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Beauty staple Loraq has also gotten into the body glow game with their shimmering body oil Glow and Behold, which “envelops the skin in multifaceted shimmer”. Buy here–the offer is online only.

16. The Body Shop’s Honey Bronze Shimmering Dry Oil

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The Body Shop is famous for their high quality, affordable products, so you know their body oil will be good. Made with community trade honey, they promise that their body oil is grease-free. Buy here.

17. NARS Monoi Body Glow

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You can’t go wrong with NARS–the company that delivered us both their famous Creamy Concealer and their Orgasm Blush. Their Monoi Body Glow is another entry into the hall of fame. Buy here.

Celebrate This Cool Jefa: Luisa Capetillo The Boricua Activist Arrested For Wearing Pants

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Celebrate This Cool Jefa: Luisa Capetillo The Boricua Activist Arrested For Wearing Pants

Born on October 28, 1879, in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, Luisa Capetillo is best known for her contributions to the labor and anarchist movements in Puerto Rico at the time. She’s also famously remembered as the first Puerto Rican woman to ever have worn pants in public. 

However, her commitment to break the glass ceiling and break traditional societal norms imposed on women extended beyond her fashion choices. Capetillo was a diligent organizer and passionate activist who advocated for women’s rights. She was an all-around badass. 

In a children’s e-book on Rejected Princesses, you can learn more about Luisa Capetillo’s life, one learns about her beginnings and when she first started to become an activist. 

In 1951, Luisa Capetillo became the first Puerto Rican woman to ever wear pants in public in 1951. 

Due to this, it’s been said that she was stopped and arrested for “causing a scandal.” News outlets back then reported that Capetillo defended herself ardently against the claims that she was causing a scandal for wearing pants. 

She has been quoted as saying, “Your Honor, I always wear pants,” and then slightly lifted her dress to show a pair of loose white pants. “And on the night in question, instead of wearing them underneath, I wore them just like men do, based on my perfect civil right to do so, on the outside.” Tell em, Capetillo.  

Luisa Capetillo was homeschooled by her parents.

Her mother, Luisa Margarita Perone, was a French immigrant who worked in domestic work and her father, Luis Capetillo Echevarría, who was from Spain, worked in labor. Her parents never married but they formed a partnership strong enough to raise a young fiery and passionate woman. 

Capetillo’s parents were also drawn together by their similar “beliefs in democratic ideals expressed in the attempted European revolutions of 1848.” They devoted their time to homeschooling her through a liberal education that was infused with ideological influences of both the French Revolution and the workers’ rights movement in Northern Spain. 

Her homeschool education heavily influenced the work she would be later known for. 

After a romance that didn’t end well, and that resulted in two children, she began working as a reader at a tobacco company after the Spanish-American war in Puerto Rico. Readers were needed at companies because, at the time, most of the workforce was illiterature and poorly-educated. As a result, unions hired readers to read newspapers and books out loud during work hours. 

The tobacco factory was also where Capetillo first came into contact with labor unions. What she learned through unions, she used to educate many women across Puerto Rico. 

Her work at the tobacco company also inspired her to write opinion essays and in her writing, she criticized the labor conditions tobacco workers were exposed to.

In an essay titled, “Mi opinión,” Capetillo writes: “Oh you woman! who is capable and willing to spread the seed of justice; do not hesitate, do not fret, do not run away, go forward! And for the benefit of the future generations place the first stone for the building of social equality in a serene but firm way, with all the right that belongs to you, without looking down, since you are no longer the ancient material or intellectual slave.” 

Further, working at the tobacco company led her to organize strikes. It also led her to become an anarchist and inspired material for the four books that she would write. 

Luisa Capetillo was a feminist way ahead of her time and advocated heavily for women’s rights.

Especially when it had to do with female agency. For 1910, she definitely way ahead of the curve. 

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💪 Mes de la mujer: Luisa Capetillo Born in Arecibo, Puerto Rico in 1879, Luisa was homeschooled by her parents and later became one of the island’s most important women’s rights activists of her time. She worked as a reader in a cigar making factory and that provided her with her first experiences with labor unions. In 1904, she wrote Mi Opinión (My Opinion), which encouraged women to fight for equal rights. Capetillo’s writing often discusses identity and seeks to motivate women. In her essay ¿Anarquista y espiritista? (Anarchist and Spiritis?) she discusses how she considered herself to be both. • Luis is best known for her involvement in the 1905 farm workers’ strike. She became the leader of the American Federation of Labor and began urging women to fight for their rights. In 1908, she asked the union to approve a women’s suffrage policy. Four years later, she traveled to NYC and Florida to organize Cuban and Puerto Rican tobacco workers; she joined various labor strikes in Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Capetillo was also the first woman in Puerto Rico to wear pants in public. In 1910, it was illegal for women to wear pants in public and she was jailed (the charges were eventually dropped). Later that year, she helped pass a minimum wage law in Puerto Rico. Luisa Capetillo passed away in October 1922. • Capetillo’s legacy includes Casa Protegida Luisa Capetillo: a non-profit organization whose purpose is to defend mistreated women, the Luisa Capetillo Center of Documentation at UPR Cayey: a part of the university’s Women’s Studies project, and a plaque in La Plaza en Honor a la Mujer Puertorriqueña. ⚡️ Luisa Capetillo was submitted as a mujer pode🌹 by one of program organizers/coordinators in Puerto Rico! ⚡️ Stay posted for tomorrow’s mujer pode🌹 from another one of our team members! 📸: Libcom.org • • • • • • • • • • • #puertorico #womenshistorymonth #womenshistory #luisacapetillo #arecibo #history #mujer #mujerpoderosa #studyabroad #westernillinois #westernillinoisuniversity #wiu #wiu18 #wiu19 #wiu20 #wiu21 #wiu22 #wiu23 #puertoricanhistory

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The social labor organizer became well known for her advocacy for equal rights for women, free love, and human emancipation. She developed a lot of her ideals of anarchism and romanticism from being an avid reader as a child. She read a lot of French literature from writers including Victor Hugo and Emile Zola. She also read a lot of Russian Romantics like Leo Tolstoy. 

She died of tuberculosis in 1922 but her legacy and impact as one of Puerto Rico’s first women suffragists live on. 

In 1912, she traveled to New York City where she organized workers in the tobacco factories there. From 1916-1918, she was involved in an intense period of strikes and she would constantly travel from New York City and Puerto Rico. 

She even traveled to Cuba to work with the Federation of Anarchists of Cuba. A couple of years after she contracted tuberculosis and died at 42. 

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