Culture

Someone Thought It Was A Good Idea To Open A Narco-Taqueria

Drug lords are EVERYWHERE these days. Not only do they make headlines on the news, they’re immortalized on narcocorridos, and their stories are told on telenovelas like “El Señor de Los Cielos” and TV shows like Netflix’s “Narcos.”


Now, a taco shop just outside of Los Angeles is bringing even more notoriety to narcos, with a side of salsa roja.

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Tacos Los Desvelados, which roughly translates to “The Insomniac Tacos,” has a chalkboard menu featuring a who’s who of the narco world.

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CREDIT: Univision Noticias / YouTube

You don’t order carne asada burritos here — no, at this narco-themed taqueria, it’s all about the burrito de Pablo Escobar or tacos de El Chapito Guzman (they’re mini tacos). Oh, there’s also a taco dedicated to the most famous woman in the drug trading business: Sandra Avila Beltran, a.k.a. La Reina del Pacifico.


If burritos and tacos aren’t your thing, there are the Nachos Coronel, named after the late Sinaloa Cartel boss Ignacio “Nacho” Coronel Villareal.

Credit: @tacoslosdesvelados / Instagram

Besides its narco-themed eats, Tacos Los Desvelados’ biggest attraction (or eye sore, depending on who you ask) had been a shrine dedicated to El Chapo.

The Chapo shrine may be gone, but you can still find him on tabletops…

Credit: @tacoslosdesvelados / Instagram

You’ll also find Scarface…

Credit: @tacoslosdesvelados / Instagram

And Pablo Escobar, who appears on fake blood-stained tabletops and several posters that line the walls of the taqueria.

They’ve even got the endorsement of narcocorrido singer El Komander:

Credit: @tacoslosdesvelados / Instagram

The mastermind behind these cartel creations is Fabricio Ramirez, a Mexican immigrant who moved to the U.S. with dreams of becoming a doctor.

#tacoslosdesvelados #elgordoylaflaca #univision #lostacosmasbuscadosdelmundo www.tacoslosdesvelados.net

A photo posted by Tacoslosdesvelados (@tacoslosdesvelados) on

Ramirez appears to believe he’s just giving people what they want.

#elchapitoguzman #tacoslosdesvelados #lostacosmasbuscadosdelmundo #maywood www.tacoslosdesvelados.net

A photo posted by Tacoslosdesvelados (@tacoslosdesvelados) on

“We have narco-corridos, so why not narco-tacos?” Ramirez told the Los Angeles Times.

For those of you who want to take a step inside the narco world without having to go to the dark side (or build your own escape tunnel El Chapo-style), take a trip to this taqueria that is tucked unassumingly between a tax preparation office and a doughnut shop.


Are you going to eat tacos at this narco-themed taqueria? Let your friends know! 

READ: Tacos Saved This Man From Committing Suicide

Never Underestimate The Love Of Carnitas: A Mexican Man Sets Guinness World Record With This Insane Taco

Culture

Never Underestimate The Love Of Carnitas: A Mexican Man Sets Guinness World Record With This Insane Taco

@luisbnava / Twitter

Mexicans have been putting food inside a tortilla, folding it in half and calling it breakfast, lunch and dinner, since before the Popol Vuh came to be. Tacos are our love language, our most precious export to the world —ok maybe that’s an exaggeration… or is it? You could offer us caviar, pâté de foie gras, white truffles, oysters and we’d (rightly so) still choose a taco de carne asada. But there’s one Mexican among us all who loves tacos so much, he set out to make the world’s largest one. Stuffed with Carnitas, and weighing an exorbitant amount, Alejandro Paredes managed to produce the world’s biggest taco de carnitas. 

Queretaro is the record holder for the world’s largest taco de carnitas.

The state of Queretaro in Mexico earned the Guinness World Record for their gigantic taco de carnitas a few weeks ago. The monster-taco stretched to an entire city block, and measured 102 meters long (nearly 335 ft) and weighed 1,200 kilograms of tortillas (almost 3,000 lbs) and 1,507 kilograms of delicious carnitas (just over 3300 lbs).

Alejandro Paredes Resendiz is responsible for the carnitas-filled monstrosity. 

Credit: @luisbnava / Twitter

The organizer of the event came up with the idea in 2011, when he promised his uncle —the head of Queretaro’s gastronomical council— that he would make the world’s biggest carnitas taco. 

Apparently, the Guinness record committee declined several applications prior to Paredes’.

Alejandro Paredes said the Guinness organizing committee had already declined five previous applications for ‘the world’s biggest carnitas taco’, so he waited until he knew he could fulfill all the requirements necessary to qualify for a world record.  “We used certified workers with history in Querétaro,” said Paredes. “We complied with all the regulations of the Guinness contract. All of the carnitas were made today, everyone had the proper equipment and, most importantly, we shared the food with all who attended.”

Guinness World Records does not award prize money, but Paredes said that if they raise any money as a result of the record, it will be donated.

“If we earn even one peso, it will be donated to the DIF family services center, because Querétaro should be the best state in Latin America,” he said.

For Reséndiz, the achievement was not only a world record, but also a personal best.

“I broke my own record because the last taco I made was 75 meters long. It was registered, but not certified. I hope that all 1500 people can eat. We began at six in the morning and we won’t go home until the volunteers feed the visitors and the taco is gone,” he said.

The enormous taco fed 1500 attendees. It took more than 25 chefs and 150 gastronomy students to prepare the record-breaking feat. The huge team of cooks started preparing the food 12 hours prior to the assembly of the taco. 

Queretaro managed to take Guadalajara’s record. 

The 102 meter long taco, made in Queretaro, broke the record that had been set by Guadalajara with its 75 meter long taco a few years prior.

But why carnitas in Queretaro?

Credit: donmacizo / Instagram

In Mexico, each state has its own culinary traditions and local plates — ‘carnitas’ is not typical of Queretaro, so why did they decide to make this particular taco?

“I recognize that there are other states in the country, like Michoacán, where they make delicious carnitas, but here in Querétaro there are seven different styles,” Paredes said. Alejandro Paredes claims to have conducted a study to find our which food was most consumed in his state, and voila, he found out that the people of Queretaro love carnitas. 

Carnitas are made by cooking the different parts of the pig in giant copper or stainless steel pots. The meat is traditionally seasoned with a mineral salt called tequesquite, but there are many different regional variations.

Local tourist agencies, taqueros, and municipal authorities plan to share the news about the record-breaking event, to promote tourism in the area and to invite taco-lovers everywhere, from Mexico and the world, to visit Queretaro and try its delicious carnitas. 

Mormon Boy Who Survived Cartel Shooting Reveals His Mom’s Last Words

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Mormon Boy Who Survived Cartel Shooting Reveals His Mom’s Last Words

@_1BUV / Twitter

The teenage boy who hiked 14 miles to save his wounded family has revealed painful details from the Mexican cartel shooting that killed nine members of his fundamentalist Mormon family, including his mother and two younger brothers. During an interview with Good Morning America, 13-year-old Devin Langford recalled the compounded trauma of his family’s car being peppered by bullets, killing his mother and siblings, and the frantic 14-mile hike back to his home. Devin horrifically describes the terrifying moment that his mom, Dawna, realized their car couldn’t whisk them to safety. “Get down. Right now,” were Dawna’s last words to her children, hoping that her advice would save them. Her words were enough to save young Devin, who survived without physical injury and was able to hike 14 miles to retrieve help for his injured siblings.

“To be honest with you,” his father, David Langford, told through tears, “my boy’s a hero simply because he gave his life for his brothers and sisters.”

“She was trying to pray to the Lord, and trying to get the car to start to get us out of there,” Devin Langford told Good Morning America.

Credit: @ClickySound / Twitter

He thinks that the cartel had deliberately shot at the engine so that the cars would be rendered useless in an escape attempt. “Afterwards they got us out of the car, and they just got us on the floor, and they drove off,” he said, further corroborating theories that the cartel thought their SUVs belonged to that of a rival gang. Once the gunmen realized they had shot and killed three mothers and six of their children, they fled, leaving the survivors helpless.

Devin revealed that, at first, he and all his siblings had tried to walk back to the family home together. “We walked a little while until we couldn’t carry [Baby Brixton] no more,” he told ABC. Nine-month-old Brixton suffered a bullet wound on his chest and was bleeding badly. “So, we put him behind a bush,” Devin explained to ABC. “I wasn’t hit or nothing, so I started walking because every one of them were bleeding so bad, so I was trying to get in a rush to get there.”

Devin thought his family’s murderers were following him those fateful 14 miles.

Credit: @_1BUV / Twitter

Instead of grieving or processing the violent murders of his family, or his near-death experience, he went into survival mode and left his injured siblings and the bloodied bodies of his family behind. During the six hours it takes to hike 14 miles, Devin was left with only his thoughts. Among the need to navigate without a map or compass, he was weighed down with the fear that the cartel members who let him live were in fact following him, or training a target on his back to shoot him dead in his tracks. The whole time he was worried “that there wasn’t anybody else out there trying to shoot me or follow me” or, of course, he was thinking about his mom and two brothers who died moments before.

“Every one of my children that survived are living miracles,” David told ABC.

Credit: Kenny LeBaron / Facebook

“How many bullet holes were fired into that vehicle… at that horrific scene and how many children were involved. It’s amazing. It’s amazing. It’s beyond amazing that they survived,” Devin’s father David Langford told the outlet. The Langfords moved to northern Mexico in the 1950s, when polygamy was banned in the United States. Now, David and his plural wife, Margaret, have moved their family back to Arizona. “Not only have I lost a wife and two children but having to move the rest of my family with really no place to go…,” David grieved the loss of an entire way of life. 

David’s sister, Leah Langford-Stadden, told the Daily News, “They’re scared for their lives. They’re leaving everything behind. It’s an exodus.” As the Langfords packed their things and began the final drive out from their home, a caravan of 100 family members joined them to send them off in solidarity. Many of them may leave as well. “It’s horrible. It’s a paradise lost, for sure. It’s heartbreaking,” Langford-Stadden said of a community shattered.

“I believe in forgiveness, but I also believe in justice and forgiveness doesn’t rob justice,” David told ABC.

Credit: Tiffany Langford / Facebook

The Langfords left hundreds of acres of pecan orchards behind after burying Dawna, 43, Trevor Harvey, 11, and Rogan Jay, 3. The FBI is now participating in Mexico’s investigation of the attack.

READ: Mexican Authorities Think The Mormon Family Was Murdered Because A Drug Lord Thought They Were A Rival Gang