Culture

Someone Thought It Was A Good Idea To Open A Narco-Taqueria

Drug lords are EVERYWHERE these days. Not only do they make headlines on the news, they’re immortalized on narcocorridos, and their stories are told on telenovelas like “El Señor de Los Cielos” and TV shows like Netflix’s “Narcos.”


Now, a taco shop just outside of Los Angeles is bringing even more notoriety to narcos, with a side of salsa roja.

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Tacos Los Desvelados, which roughly translates to “The Insomniac Tacos,” has a chalkboard menu featuring a who’s who of the narco world.

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CREDIT: Univision Noticias / YouTube

You don’t order carne asada burritos here — no, at this narco-themed taqueria, it’s all about the burrito de Pablo Escobar or tacos de El Chapito Guzman (they’re mini tacos). Oh, there’s also a taco dedicated to the most famous woman in the drug trading business: Sandra Avila Beltran, a.k.a. La Reina del Pacifico.


If burritos and tacos aren’t your thing, there are the Nachos Coronel, named after the late Sinaloa Cartel boss Ignacio “Nacho” Coronel Villareal.

Credit: @tacoslosdesvelados / Instagram

Besides its narco-themed eats, Tacos Los Desvelados’ biggest attraction (or eye sore, depending on who you ask) had been a shrine dedicated to El Chapo.

The Chapo shrine may be gone, but you can still find him on tabletops…

Credit: @tacoslosdesvelados / Instagram

You’ll also find Scarface…

Credit: @tacoslosdesvelados / Instagram

And Pablo Escobar, who appears on fake blood-stained tabletops and several posters that line the walls of the taqueria.

They’ve even got the endorsement of narcocorrido singer El Komander:

Credit: @tacoslosdesvelados / Instagram

The mastermind behind these cartel creations is Fabricio Ramirez, a Mexican immigrant who moved to the U.S. with dreams of becoming a doctor.

#tacoslosdesvelados #elgordoylaflaca #univision #lostacosmasbuscadosdelmundo www.tacoslosdesvelados.net

A photo posted by Tacoslosdesvelados (@tacoslosdesvelados) on

Ramirez appears to believe he’s just giving people what they want.

#elchapitoguzman #tacoslosdesvelados #lostacosmasbuscadosdelmundo #maywood www.tacoslosdesvelados.net

A photo posted by Tacoslosdesvelados (@tacoslosdesvelados) on

“We have narco-corridos, so why not narco-tacos?” Ramirez told the Los Angeles Times.

For those of you who want to take a step inside the narco world without having to go to the dark side (or build your own escape tunnel El Chapo-style), take a trip to this taqueria that is tucked unassumingly between a tax preparation office and a doughnut shop.


Are you going to eat tacos at this narco-themed taqueria? Let your friends know! 

READ: Tacos Saved This Man From Committing Suicide

Taco Tuesday Is Legally Trademarked But This Is Why That Doesn’t Really Mean Anything

Culture

Taco Tuesday Is Legally Trademarked But This Is Why That Doesn’t Really Mean Anything

@tacojohns

If you go out on a Tuesday, it’s pretty common to see signs at various establishments that say “Taco Tuesday.” You’ll also so see “Wine Wednesday,” “Thirsty Thursday,” “Friday Funday,” etc. These are what you call familiar catchphrases, which means they’re used all the time, by people all over the world. If you ask who invented these standard terms, you’d probably say that God did, or that they’ve just existed forever. Well, that mentality perhaps might be correct, but in this great country of weird laws, it doesn’t matter who invented something but rather who puts their claim on it by trademarking it first. 

A taco chain restaurant called Taco John’s — based in Cheyenne, Wyoming — trademarked the term “Taco Tuesday” in 1989, and is sick of people using the phrase.

According to the Associated Press, Taco John’s has 400 locations in 23 states. The phrase “Taco Tuesday” is only legal for them to use in all states except in New Jersey, where someone there also trademarked the phrase before them. Guess we will never who actually coined the term int he first place. 

But the real issue here is how it can be possible for any one establishment, especially independent ones, to stop using the term that is as common as “happy birthday.” 

For years, Taco John’s has been sending cease-and-desist letters to several eateries for their illegal use of “Taco Tuesday.” Most recently they targeted a brewery that doesn’t even profit from the sale of tacos.

Freedom’s Edge Brewing Co., located near the Taco John’s headquarters, was advertising a “taco truck that parks outside its establishment once a week,” and used the “Taco Tuesday” catchphrase. Taco John’s clearly saw it and was pissed because they sent Freedom’s Edge a cease-and-desist letter to stop advertising by using “Taco Tuesday.” 

“We have nothing against Taco John’s but do find it comical that some person in their corporate office would choose to send a cease and desist to a brewery that doesn’t sell or profit from the sales of tacos,” the brewery said in a statement, according to the AP. They also said they had no idea that “Taco Tuesday” was trademarked. Hey, we didn’t either. 

People on social media say Taco John’s have taken their trademark of “Taco Tuesday” too far. 

Antone Duran said on Facebook that Taco John’s is going after the wrong people and said the term is so common it’s unfair to target an independent establishment.  

“I’ve traveled 34 states and throughout the country, I’ve heard or read “taco Tuesday” at restaurants and bars,” Duran said. “Even where I live now in Palm Springs. And I guarantee most of those places never even heard of taco John’s. So perhaps they were quick to trademark it, but they sure as hell didn’t invent it. And I guarantee they’re not going after hundreds of other restaurants throughout the country to demanding they stop. Lol. Petty for them to go after this place.”

Legal experts say that Taco John’s, unfortunately (or fortunately for the rest of us) doesn’t stand much of a chance in the court system to legally demand places stop using “Taco Tuesday.”

Seattle-based attorney Michael Atkins told the AP the catchphrase is used so commonly that it’s almost impossible to go after each entity that uses it. “Taco Tuesday” has been used everywhere from small signages at the corner shop to commercials to movies. 

“It’s kind of asinine to me think that one particular taco seller, or taco maker, would have monopoly rights over ‘Taco Tuesday,'” Atkins told the publication. “It has become such a common phrase that it no longer points to Taco John’s and therefore Taco John’s doesn’t have the right to tell anybody to stop using that.”

In some ways, we kind of feel bad for Taco John’s. They went all-in on a phrase that ended up being super popular, and now they can’t even make a profit on it. On the other hand, they’re an established restaurant making millions off of Mexican food. They’ll survive.

READ: Cautionary Tale: A Fresno Man Died During A Taco-Eating Contest And People Are Left Wondering How

Cautionary Tale: A Fresno Man Died During A Taco-Eating Contest And People Are Left Wondering How

Things That Matter

Cautionary Tale: A Fresno Man Died During A Taco-Eating Contest And People Are Left Wondering How

Hooplacatering / Instagram

Tacos are our witness. We’re guessing yours too. If we could only eat one kind of food for the rest of our lives, it would probably be tacos. The taco phenomenon has gone global, we’ve got Taco Tuesdays, a variety of tacos in every country, and taco accessories to fill our heart’s desire. But where’s the limit? Unfortunately, there is, in fact, a limit. 

A 41-year man died while participating in a taco-eating contest at a baseball stadium in Fresno, Ca. 

According to news reports, Dana Hutchings was at the Grizzlies and the Memphis Redbirds game and entered a contest that took place between innings at Chukchansi Park. Hutchings had told his mom and sister that he would be participating in the taco-eating contest hours before it took place. 

The Fresno Bee reports that Hutchings went down seven minutes into the contest. 

During the contest, the man started choking. He fell and subsequently hit his head on the table. 

Credit: Instagram/@bodegasobe

According to CBS Sports, medical professionals performed CPR on him until the paramedics arrived. They pronounced him dead upon arriving at the Community Regional Medical Center. The autopsy with the cause of death has yet to be released. 

“He told us he was going to a taco eating contest, but we didn’t think something like this would happen,” his sister, Mecca Hutchings, told ABC30. His mother added, “He said my son wasn’t responding to anything. How they identified him was that he has a tattoo on his hand that says Dora.” 

One person that saw him eating the tacos noticed that Hutchings “was eating so fast compared to the other two (contestants),” Matthew Boylan told The Fresno Bee. He added, “It was like he’d never eaten before. He was just shoving the tacos down his mouth without chewing.”

It’s unclear how many other people were participating in the contest, or what type of taco they were consuming. 

Credit: Instagram/@hooplacatering

“We are devastated to learn that the fan that received medical attention following an event at Tuesday evening’s game has passed away,” the Grizzlies said in a statement provided by Deadspin. “The Fresno Grizzlies extend our heartfelt prayers and condolences to the family of Mr. Hutchings. The safety and security of our fans is our highest priority. We will work closely with local authorities and provide any helpful information that is requested.”

The contest, which occurred on Tuesday, was scheduled as a kick-off to the main event, Taco Truck Throwdown 9, that is set for Saturday. 

Credit: Instagram/@itsgonzilla

The taco party on Saturday includes a live musical performance by A.B. Quintanilla’s Kumbia Kings. There was also another taco eating-contest for that day, but they have since canceled that portion. 

Andy McMurray, a fan of the Grizzlies baseball team, said it was right for them to cancel the taco-eating contest after the tragic event that happened earlier this week. 

“It’s a sad thing to see happen because people are just trying to have fun. It’s sad to see, I think the Grizzlies acted in the appropriate way considering,” McMurray told ABC30.

Some people are not happy about the cancelation of Saturday’s taco-eating contest. 

The contest is being canceled out of respect and also out of concern. It is a freak and rare event that happened earlier this week, but imagine if someone else had an accident during the taco-eating contest? There could be serious repercussions for the event organizers. Instead, they should do some kind of tribute to Hutchings by having his family say some words about him. 

While this is no laughing matter, people on social media couldn’t help but see the irony of someone dying by eating such a tasty dish.

This is not the first time someone has died in a food-eating contest. These sorts of competitions shouldn’t be taken lightly. A lot of training goes into this competitive eating sport.

Do you think you’d rest in peace dying in such a way?

As much as we love tacos, we don’t believe this would be a good way to go. What do you think?

READ: These Wild Taco Creations Have Us Feeling All Sorts Of Ways 

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