entertainment

Laurie Hernandez Just Won Her Second Olympic Medal In Rio

NBCOlympics

Laurie Hernandez has officially wrapped up her first Olympic Games and we just can’t get enough of the bright-eyed Puerto Rican powerhouse. Although we wish we could’ve seen more of her, the Boricua is going back to New Jersey with two Olympic medals — no small feat.

Laurie Hernandez just ended her Olympic debut by winning the silver medal in the women’s balance beam event.

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Credit: nbcolympics.com

The 5’0,” 105-pound gymnast definitely won the hearts of Americans from coast to coast. She nailed the floor routine and helped the U.S. women’s gymnastics team win the team gold for the second year in a row.

She was so solid on her beam routine that she beat out fellow American Simone Biles, who took home the bronze.

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Credit: nbcolympics.com

Hernandez scored a 15.333 on her balance beam routine, coming just behind Sanne Wevers of the Netherlands, who scored a 15.466. Wevers became the first Dutch woman to win a women’s individual medal for gymnastics in the country’s history.

Now we wait for another super sweet social media post from her brother. #SiblingGoalsAF

The selfie I get from my sis right after she competed ?? even though I haven't even watched it yet on NBC ?. But anyways I am so proud of who you are and what you've accomplished. We were talking about this being a possibility a decade ago and to see it actually happen is too much for me to handle. It's blowing my mind how the same little girl I used to see doing flips on my bed at age 6 now has a gold medal. I have seen you deal with so much adversity with the sport over the last several years and to finally see your hard work culminate makes it all worth it. You're the toughest little 16 year old I've ever met and I'm not saying that just cause I'm a proud bro. Remember to give God his glory always! Love you sis and can't wait to see you kill it Monday as well. As soon as you land we're going straight to Wawa

A photo posted by Marcus Hernandez (@marcusss_21) on

Laurie’s brother, Marcus Hernandez, posted this photo on Instagram the night the U.S. Women’s team won the team all-around competition. He should expect to get another one after Laurie’s second medal.

Well done, Laurie! You earned it, girl.

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Credit: nbcolympics.com

But, there is just one question all of America is asking: Hernandez, any chance of Tokyo 2020?

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Credit: Got Milk? / dreamingoftheworldxx / Tumblr

We just didn’t get enough of you during these Olympics. We’re low-key (OK, maybe not low-key) begging you to come back in four years.

READ: After A Personal Setback, This Latina Is Killing It At The Olympics

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Ever Wondered What The Mexican Flag Would Look Like As An Anime Samurai, Well Now We Know

Things That Matter

Ever Wondered What The Mexican Flag Would Look Like As An Anime Samurai, Well Now We Know

World Flags

It’s no doubt that the Japanese do a number of things better than anyone else.

As the host of the 2020 Olympics, Japan first wowed us with how they decided to produce the Olympic medals – by recycling gold, silver, and bronze found in discarded smartphones and laptops. A plan that not only saves them a ton of money, but is also really good for the environment!

Now, it appears that several artists in Japan have reimagined the flags of each competing country as anime samurais to help promote the Games.

A Japanese website is promoting the Tokyo 2020 Olympics in the most Japanese way possible – by combining anime and country flags of the world.

Credit: worldflags

This project isn’t directly affiliated with the government of Japan or with the Japanese Olympics committee. It was just some artists who were excited for the Games and decided to draw some cool samurais and upload them onto a website called “World Flags” to help introduce people to the countries that will be competing in this global competition.

Although the artwork of each of the characters is very Japanese-inspired, each samurai is inspired by the culture, history and national identity of each country, giving us a “harmony in diversity” kind of vibe.

Check out some of the ones they did for Latin American countries below:

Credit: worldflags

The Brazilian samurai has the traditional Brazilian flag front and center in its design. The samurai features the yellow diamond which represents “Mother Earth,” while the blue circle represents the morning sky above Rio de Janeiro on the day the republic was established.

By the way, there is a star that shines exceptionally big above the white belt in the stars among the stars in the blue circle, Virgo Spica. Many may think that this is the capital Brasilia. Actually, this is Para. It is neither Rio de Janeiro nor Sao Paulo. By the way, Brasilia is a small star at the bottom.

Argentina’s samurai is fully representing with the ‘sol de mayo.’

Credit: worldflags

The colors in this samurai outfit are giving me life! And they also included the iconic Sol de Mayo prominently across his chest.

While Mexico’s is complete with an eagle!

Credit: worldflags

We all know the Mexican flag has a giant eagle holding a snake in its talons, so to see it come to life in this form is so cool. And look at those boots!

The artist even named the samurai “Falconer.”

As for the meaning: Green means “the hope of the people in the destiny of the nation”, white means “catholic or religious purity”, red means “blood of a patriot who has united with the country.”

We might be biased, but we think the Latino samurai are probably the best out of them all.

But, in case you were wondering, here are some versions from other countries:

Credit: worldflags

The artists gave a shout out to Old Glory with their version of the US samurai.

And according to the artists: White is purity and innocence. Red is hardiness and valor. Blue stands for vigilance, perseverance, and justice.

And India’s samurai looks pretty amazing.

Credit: worldflags

The colors of the Indian samurai are as follows: the upper saffron color symbolizes Hinduism. The green in the lower row symbolizes Islam. The middle white means the reconciliation of both religions. The union of the two religions is the manifestation of the intention that it is essential for the unity of India. 

And check out the one they drew up for South Africa.

Credit: worldflags

There are two theories about the color of the national flag. 

Red is the bloodshed of the past confrontation, blue is the sky and the surrounding sea, green represents farms and nature, yellow is mineral resources such as gold, black represents the black population, while white represents the white population.

Each of the colors is also derived from the British and Dutch flags of the former colonial powers.

And the Chinese have to got be loving their samurai interpretation.

Credit: worldflags

Red is used as the main color of the flag in socialist countries. It can be seen with the former Soviet flag and the present Vietnam flag. It is a color that represents communism and socialism. 

In China, the flag has become a symbol of class struggle between capitalists and workers. The largest of the yellow five stars is said to represent the Chinese Communist Party that leads to the revolution. The other four represent workers, farmers, patriotic capitalists, and intellectuals.

And can we talk about how hot the samurai is for Italy?!

Credit: worldflags

The Italian flag and the French flag are the same tricolor flag although they are different in color. It is believed that the Napoleonic era is the beginning of the official use of the three-color flag of green, white and red in Italy. 

The tricolor flag was revived as the flag of the Kingdom of Italy, after the defeat of Napolean.

While the samurai from the UAE comes with a legit sword!

Credit: worldflags

The present design dates back to the country’s independence. Each color has a solid origin and meaning, and these four colors are said to be key Arab colors. The four colors are red, green, white and black. Countries around the Middle East also have some of the same four-color flags.

Puerto Rican Slang and Culture Through Bad Bunny Lyrics in Photos

Entertainment

Puerto Rican Slang and Culture Through Bad Bunny Lyrics in Photos

Bad Bunny | YouTube

Puerto Rican reggaetonero and trap artist El Conejo Malo has gone from bagging groceries in his home town of Vega Baja, Puerto Rico to a full-fledged award-winning artist in the span of just a couple years. While the 25-year-old has become an international success, he’s committed to his roots and it shows.

His album X100pre Nochebuena is the gift that keeps on giving to the world. For any Boricua that has his album on loop, you might keep picking up on new gems along the way.

Or, if you’re like me and grew up in the U.S., I guarantee you will be delighted to learn what El Conejo Malo was referencing.

Here’s just some of what you might have missed from Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio’s debut album.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

From santería to Puerto Rican world boxing champion Iván Calderón Marrero, his tracks might remind you of that one decade all your tías dressed in white or your machísmo tío’s poster shrine to Calderón.

We all know Bad Bunny se encanta los perreos.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

It’s the most reggaeton and Boricua slang of the whole album, sneaking its way into almost every canción. Perreo is what you might have called “grinding” in middle school.

In “Como Antes,” the Tazos are little collectible discs found in Frito-Lay chip bags.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

“Me puse a jugar Tazo” he sings, in reference to the toys. He also references the exact time Los Simpsons aired (a las cuatro).

Bad Bunny pays tribute to Daddy Yankee all album long.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

In “Cuando Perriabas,” Bad Bunny sings, “Y bum, pa’ atrá’, bum-bum, pa’ alante/Este party es sólo para la gente que aguante.” Remember Daddy Yankee’s 2004 “Donde Hubo Fuego” when he sings the same verses? This whole song is basically a tribute to all the parties that gave birth to the perreos.

In “200 MPH,” BB gives another nod to Daddy Yankee’s appearance in Talento de Barrio.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Remember that 2008 film about Daddy Yankee’s escape from a life of drug dealing through reggaeton? The characters in the film were Dinero and Wichy, which is who Bad Bunny is referring to in the letra “Dinero, dinero, me falta Wichy.”

Unless you a Bori, you wouldn’t know “bichote” is slang for drug dealer.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Another nod at Talento de Barrio, BB sings about his young-hearted dream to become a bichote, a king in the streets. He also calls out the Puerto Rican government for closing down schools, which give way to “puntas” (a.k.a. trap houses).

BB expands from reggaeton to honor Nuyorican pianists and salsa artists también.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Me siento Ray, pero Richie” refers to Puerto Rican pianist and composer Richie Ray who is known as “El Embajador del Piano.” “Rumba buena, timbalero” is about salsa band La Sonora Ponceña’s song “Timbalero,” a song many of us grew up dancing to while we cleaned the house.

In “Ni Bien Ni Mal,” BB pays tribute to Boricua trapero Miky Woodz.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

He sings, “como dice Miky, no te voy a mentir.” That means BB has spooken: if you haven’t heard Miky’s 2017 song “No Te Wa a Mentir,” get to it.

We even hear allusions to santería, a religion only practiced in Afro-Latino Caribbean islands.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Ando de blanco entero, flow santero” paints the picture of Boricuas, Cubanos y Dominicanos walking the streets in all white, in honor of the Yoruba-Catholic religion. Only Boris and our gente de islas know about the altars with bowls of holy water, statues of saints and candles hidden in their abuelita’s closets.

My all time favorite Bori slang is in “Caro.”

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Your Spanish teacher will tell you that “caro” means expensive, but in Puerto Rico, it can mean a beautiful girl who knows her worth and will never sleep with you or more simply, self-worth. In “Caro,” BB flexes this imagery to combat the haters of his gender fluidity.

During the angelic interlude, Ricky Martin’s vocals add even more depth to the song.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

¿Por qué no puedo ser así?
¿En qué te hago daño a ti?
¿En qué te hago daño a ti?
Yo solamente soy feliz

Every Bori remembers the decade of the chismosando dentro nuestros tías, all speculating on Ricky Martin’s sexuality. He was beautiful and everyone wanted to sleep with him, but he refused to comment on his identity until much later. This ballad touches on an inter-generational pandora’s box of emotions around Latino culture’s rigid expectation of sexuality and gender expression. BB knows his worth, and that “con dinero y sin dinero, mi flow es caro.”

“Otra Noche en Miami” is all about achieving the dreams BB had from his vantage point in PR.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Pa’l Khalifa Kush tengo la conexión. Pa’l avenue Miami Beach, e’ mi dirección” Everything is going his way, but the shine of his Rolex doesn’t shine brighter than a loved one’s smile. This is the list of the dreams he had in Puerto Rico realized before he comes to the realization that they meant nothing.

“Estamos Bien” was released as a tribute to Puerto Rican resilience post-Maria, sí.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

It’s about PR’s notorious potholes, courtesy of a lackadaisical government, and the determination and hard work of Boricuas regardless: “La Mercedes en P.R. cogiendo boquete, eh.” It’s also about BB’s own return to self. He gets the dream and becomes bored with the threesomes. It is also about the return to his island with his sanity restored.

“Solo de Mi” has quickly become the poster song for well-known cultural issues domestic violence in Latino homes.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Venezuelan actress Laura Chimaras seems to be invisibly beaten while singing about her self ownership. Eventually, the bruises clear and we head straight into a perreo where we hear references to Hector y Tito’s “Noches de Travesura” when BB sings “Hoy e’ noche ‘e travesura/hoy e’ pata’ abajo.”

“Baby me siento down” in “Si Estuviésemos Juntos” is love for his teenage emo heart for RKM & Ken-Y’s 2006 hit “Down.”

Bad Bunny / YouTube

The album goes from high beat perreos to raw emotionality instantaneously. We get to have “Quien Tú Eres?” and then listen to “Caro” right after. In BB’s breakup song of the album, he isn’t defaulting to the trend of move on already pop hits. He wishes he did things differently and acknowledges his part.

“La Romana” is an ode to the DR, no question.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

His collabs with Dominicano El Alfa prove that, but we still get a little spice of PR with “Ojalái, ojalái que esta noche tú sea’ mi mai, eh, hey“–an interlude in Voltio and Residente’s “Chulin Chulin Chunfly.”

“RLNDT” is about a lot of heavy mental health issues, but Boricuas hear an underlying societal message.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

In 1999, a 5-year-old Puerto Rican boy, Rolando (Rolandito “RLNDT”) Salas Jusino went missing. He was never found, no matter how much attention the entire island gave the story. In BB’s music video, we just see a still of a 5-year-old baby Bad Bunny.

Your favorite aggro workout song “Quien Tu Eres?” embodies the energy of Iván Calderón Marrero.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

BB is a self-professed fanatic of boxing. His music video for this song is just him punching this bag with a Puerto Rican flag behind him. Calderón was the Puerto Rican two-weight world boxing champ and untouchable hero for Puerto Rico.

Finally, “MÍA” both launches BB into the guy that got Canadian superstar Drake to sing in Spanish and still lift up Boricuas.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Yo soy tu Romeo, pero no Santo” makes perfect sense on it’s own–he might be a romantic but he wants to have his way with you. It also gives a subtle shout out to bachatero Romeo Santos. Nice one, BB.

All we can say is, gracias, BB, for this time capsule tribute to the ’90s and early 2000s and a 2018 classic.

Bad Bunny / YouTube

We’re still playing X100 PRE on repeat and earning our keep en La Neuva Religión. Mil gracias.

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