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This Latina Pop Star Just Dragged Trump In An Open Letter That Will Make You Slow Clap

Lauren Jauregui of Fifth Harmony wrote a powerful open letter to Donald Trump letting him know exactly what she thinks of the executive order he signed on Friday, January 27th, 2017, that temporarily bans non-U.S.-citizens (including green card-holding permanent residents, international students and refugees) from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the United States.

The 20-year-old Cuban-American did not mince words. The letter, which was published by People, opens with:

Raise your hand if you are an immigrant, or the sons and daughters of immigrant parents, or the grandchildren of immigrants, or the great-grandchildren, or great-great-grandchildren? Wait…are everyone’s hands up—including yours, Mr. Trump—except for the Indigenous people of the Americas?! Because they should be.

She gives a brief, yet sobering history of how “this country was built and continues to survive off the backs of immigrants and refugees.”


The open letter isn’t just for Trump; it’s a call to action for all of us:

If you are going to these protests, if you need health insurance for yourself or a sick loved one, if you are a woman, if you are a person of color, if you are disabled, if you practice any sort of religion, if you care about the air you breathe and the water you drink, if you showed up to that women’s march in whatever city or state or country or town you came from, you need to fight back.

And if you’re not sure what you can do, Jauregui writes:

Check out the IPJC.org and ACLU.org and take action in a community near you. We cannot afford woke tweets and Instagram posts alone. We need action. Take your future back into your hands.

Jauregui has a strong and beautiful voice regardless of whether she’s using it to sing or fight oppression.

Last, but not least, I leave you with a photo of myself. This was single handedly the most incredible day of my life. For so long I felt so alone and hopeless in my belief in humanity and love and this day proved to me just how wrong I was in thinking I was alone. I witnessed so many powerful women, men, and queer folk alike of all different genders, races, religions, classes, sexualities, you name it..come together for one common goal, equality and justice and peace. It left a fire in my soul that can never be extinguished and a reminder in my heart that my voice can NEVER be silenced. We ARE the people, THIS IS what Democracy looks like. And I will NEVER be silenced by fear or hatred or bigotry or any other infringement on our rights as human beings because we have one sole purpose in this world and that is to LOVE one another and LOVE ourselves and realize humanity's potential. FUCK THE SYSTEM AND THE PATRIARCHY. This pussy will never be grabbed or silenced. I MARCH and fight with my brothers and sisters and I will always be proud of my voice. I hope you are too❤️

A photo posted by laurenjauregui (@laurenjauregui) on


Click here to read Lauren Jauregui’s entire letter on People.

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9 Ways I Felt At Home In South Korea

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9 Ways I Felt At Home In South Korea

During a recent trip to Seoul, South Korea, I was astonished by how much Koreans love Mexican culture. I must admit that I was a little bit nervous about going to Seoul. With more than 24 million people living there, Seoul is one of the largest metropolitan areas in the world. Would I fit in, or would I have a big “tourist” stamp on my forehead? I didn’t speak the language and never learned to use chopsticks (don’t judge!). But when I heard that one of the most highly rated restaurants in the city was a taco place, I knew I would love it there.

For starters, if you Google “best place to eat in Seoul,” Vatos is high on the list.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

If the name didn’t give it away, it’s a Mexican restaurant. I had fish tacos and carne asada fries and they were so good – and I should know, I’m from Cali. Their classic margarita was also legit.

So how much do Koreans love Mexican food? Check it out — these eateries are everywhere!

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

This is something like the El Pollo Loco of Seoul. You can’t go wrong with Mexican chicken.

And these taco joints are also sprinkled all throughout Seoul.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

I spotted them everywhere. It was hard to eat local Korean food when so many awesome Mexican restaurants were around!

They also have incredible street food. This is a quesadilla/empanada with an egg.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

Lettuce, pork, cheese, and cream. It’s insanely good.

I didn’t see any eloteros, but I found these packaged elotes.

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CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

I found these treats at a convenient store. They’re perfectly packaged, too.

Churros are also a big thing in Seoul.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

They have a huge variety of sizes, different shapes and chocolate dips too!

Not only are Koreans into Mexican food, they also appreciate Mexican-American pop culture. If this Speedy Gonzalez doesn’t prove that, I don’t know what will.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

Koreans are famously known to be fashion trendsetters, and I saw this jacket a cute boutique in the Gangnam District. If you’re not familiar with this uber-cool area, perhaps this pop hit song will make you want to visit.

And I almost died when I caught “La Bamba” on TV.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

This was a great way to learn a few words in Korean.

They have really great open markets, known to us as swap meets or mercados.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

There are three major open markets in Seoul, which are Namdaemun market, Gwangjang market, and Garak Market. With tons of food, clothing, and products, these swap meets are a great way to get a real taste of local culture. Each one is very different but they all have one thing in common: you can get anything you could ever want at a very good price.

Thanks, Seoul, for making me feel at home. It’s like I never left L.A.

Araceli Cruz
CREDIT: Araceli Cruz

Visiting Seoul made me realize that I shouldn’t be intimidated about experiencing new cultures because surprisingly enough, our commonalities are immense!


READ: 9 Stressful Moments Every Latino Experiences When Traveling With Their Family

Have you traveled lately? Share this story and let us know about your latest adventures abroad in the comment section below. 

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